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  1. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ashfirst View Post
    No not at 5am when they are asleep. It takes 14 mins (even less) for a house fire to potentially cause death - I would always imagine the worst case scenario.
    I just can't live my life like that. There were something like 1300 house fires in WA in 2013/2014. That stat is tiny.

    Most modern houses these days have so many inbuilt protections in them a house fire is virtually unlikely if you have a responsible teenager at home

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  3. #92
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    My girlfriend used to go jogging and leave her 2 and 4 year old home alone asleep 😨😨😮. I was horrified. I think a sensible 13 year old is fine at home alone. It depends on what the 6 year old is like that they have to watch.

  4. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by CleverClogs View Post
    My girlfriend used to go jogging and leave her 2 and 4 year old home alone asleep 😨😨😮. I was horrified. I think a sensible 13 year old is fine at home alone. It depends on what the 6 year old is like that they have to watch.
    I think we all agree that this is ludicrous.

  5. #94
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    Why don't you just take them with you and leave them in the car?



    Sent from my SM-N910G using The Bub Hub mobile app

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  7. #95
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    It depends so much on the maturity of the older sibling. I wouldn't dream of leaving my 4 year old son with my 18 year old SIL because she is so immature and irresponsible, but myself at 13, I was babysitting my younger sister (she was 8), and my parents used to leave me on my own at home overnight at times. I'm not saying I would ever do that myself, because that IS the height of irresponsibility, but I was definitely mature enough to know what to do in an emergency.

  8. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by CMF View Post
    To you and the other PP's who quoted me re. my "tone"... there was no tone? Apologies if it came across that way. I was just giving my opinion. I was at work so probably didn't take enough time to word what I wrote.
    No worries, I do that all that time

  9. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by lulupetal View Post
    Of course, but as an adult we have the sense of mind to grab the kids, the 13yo would probably just want to get out of the house and wouldn't have the presence of mind to get the 6yo. IMO anyway..
    They will if you teach them about 'what to do in case of an emergency.' We talk about it and verbally run through drills pretty regularly. It's pretty amazing what kids can do in an emergency. Just last year a 9 year old I know rang 000 as her mum had an anaphylactic reaction in the car on the way to school to some medication she took before leaving the house. The 9 year old grabbed her mum's phone, unlocked it, called 000 and told them her mum couldn't breathe, was able to tell them exactly where they were, undid her mum's seat belt and hailed the ambulance when it came down the street.

    Just last week at school a 7 year old fell off the monkey bars and landed on his head, and felt like he couldn't move his legs. Several of his friends were there, and they made sure he didn't try and get up, they kept him still and kept talking to him (to keep him awake, he was badly concussed), while one friend ran to notify a teacher.
    I think we really need to give teens more credit.
    Last edited by Full House; 01-03-2016 at 08:11.

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  11. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Full House View Post
    They will if you teach them about 'what to do in case of an emergency.' We talk about it and verbally run through drills pretty regularly. It's pretty amazing what kids can do in an emergency. Just last year a 9 year old I know rang 000 as her mum had an anaphylactic reaction in the car on the way to school to some medication she took before leaving the house. The 9 year old grabbed her mum's phone, unlocked it, called 000 and told them her mum couldn't breathe, was able to tell them exactly where they were, undid her mum's seat belt and hailed the ambulance when it came down the street.

    Just last week at school a 7 year old fell off the monkey bars and landed on his head, and felt like he couldn't move his legs. Several of his friends were there, and they made sure he didn't try and get up, they kept him still and kept talking to him (to keep him awake, he was badly concussed), while one friend ran to notify a teacher.
    I think we really need to give teens more credit.
    That's really great that those kids had the presence of mind to do those things, I would be proud to be their parents, however I prefer to consider all circumstances and mostly how I would feel if the worst were to happen and I wouldn't be able to live with myself if something DID happen, no matter how small the chances, so I could go to the gym.. It's just not in my nature.

    As a child (10-12), my Mum used to deliver pizzas as a second job. I used to come home from school & look after myself, she would come home for an hour between 5-6 and go to work after that - I was petrified. I used to hide under my Mums bed and jump at any sound. She wouldn't get home until 10pm and half the time I'd have fallen asleep under the bed. Even now I am incredibly jumpy, and this reflects in my parenting. Maybe I worry too much, but I do prefer to be cautious (maybe too much so) than have anything unliveable happen to my children.

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  13. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by lulupetal View Post

    As a child (10-12), my Mum used to deliver pizzas as a second job. I used to come home from school & look after myself, she would come home for an hour between 5-6 and go to work after that - I was petrified. I used to hide under my Mums bed and jump at any sound. She wouldn't get home until 10pm and half the time I'd have fallen asleep under the bed. Even now I am incredibly jumpy, and this reflects in my parenting. Maybe I worry too much, but I do prefer to be cautious (maybe too much so) than have anything unliveable happen to my children.
    I'm sorry you had such a bad experience as a childhood, of course it would influence your parenting style. I had an overprotective mother (anxious person by nature), but she was still able to teach me independence, by giving me the freedom to do things she was more comfortable with. Her mother was very strict, and my mum says she wasn't prepared for the real world at all when it came time to spread her wings. They are always 'what if' scenarios...for me, I am super protective of my kids going to public toilets on their own, so we all have our 'thing.' However, with emergencies...kids should be taught how to deal with emergency situations, as there can't always be an adult around to take charge...as in the instance of the 9 year old...it was just her and her mum. There was no adult around to make that call for her, so she had to step up and handle the situation herself.

  14. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by J37 View Post
    Why don't you just take them with you and leave them in the car?



    Sent from my SM-N910G using The Bub Hub mobile app
    how would that work? do you mean leave them in the car whilst it's off? and they are inside at the gym?


 

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