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  1. #181
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    Quote Originally Posted by J37 View Post
    OK...I have a question for you girls who seem to know alot about car-seats! (Nothing to do with ERF though)...

    My 2-year-old has worked out how to undo her seat-belt, and treats it as a game. She's already been told off sternly a few times, but the little turd keeps doing it!!

    It is a Safe 'n' Sound Maxi-Rider (I think). Is there anything I can buy to attach to prevent her doing this?

    Sent from my SM-N910G using The Bub Hub mobile app
    I have been told that the rough side of a Velcro sticky dot stuck on the red button of the buckle can stop little hands pushing it. It might be an easy fix?

  2. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by nh2489 View Post
    After reading this thread I was motivated to try my 2 year old rearward facing again yesterday for a quick 15 min trip to the shops. Way there was fine but on the way back the poor little love spent 10 mins crying into his sick bowl shouting "sick sick". Luckily we made it home without him being sick but I felt very sorry for him as he obviously felt sick most of the journey. So frustrating as I always intended to rear face him for as long as possible and as HG knows the britax seat is not cheap. He's definitely worse during short stop start journeys so maybe I will have him forward for those then rearward for longer journeys such as motorways where the risk of high impact crash is higher anyway.

    And yes I also read that for babies the incidences of car sickness should be the same forward and rearward but after persevering for as long as we could rear facing and repeating vomiting, we turned him and he has generally been much better.
    My DS definitely whinges more for the stop/starting/jerky journeys and seems fine when it's just a nice smooth journey. For me personally, as a forward facing passenger, I get sick as well so I totally get that it's making him sick but I think it's more of an issue that he doesn't understand to just look straight ahead/keep his head level rather than looking down or to the side than it is which way he is facing. It's probably easier for them to keep their head looking straight ahead when they're forward facing since they can see us, so focus on dad driving, etc. when they start feeling ill. That's my thought anyway.

    Definitely annoying for you expense wise though but that was why I chose the Dualfix over one that didn't have the option to turn, so I had the flexibility if needed.
    Last edited by HollyGolightly81; 12-02-2016 at 07:14.

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  4. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by moto View Post
    I have been told that the rough side of a Velcro sticky dot stuck on the red button of the buckle can stop little hands pushing it. It might be an easy fix?
    That's a clever idea!

  5. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by HollyGolightly81 View Post
    If you read the post I was responding to she said her child was sick forward facing as well. If you google, many sites say turning them forward facing rarely makes it better, that the direction of travel isn't why you're sick.

    I get horrible motion sickness as well ☺️

    Eta: I get that that is your experience, but you can't really apply that to everyone and claim it's nonsense, ya know?
    She said in a forward facing seat it could be worse. I'm telling you it is in fact the opposite. Motion sickness would is the same for everyone, just different severity.

  6. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarahd80 View Post
    She said in a forward facing seat it could be worse. I'm telling you it is in fact the opposite. Motion sickness would is the same for everyone, just different severity.
    She said 'it may actually be worse.' Didn't flat out claim it was definitely worse. If I'm going to be sick, I'm going to be sick regardless of which way I'm facing, I always feel sick on the train regardless of seat. It's not the same for everyone, I'm sure there are situations you may feel sick in that I wouldn't and visa versa.
    Last edited by HollyGolightly81; 12-02-2016 at 08:23.

  7. #186
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    @nh2489 I found this article by a pediatrician with tips to help your child stay rearfacing if they get motion sickness:

    'As someone who, to this day, still gets very motion-sick, this is a topic near and dear to my heart. Motion sickness happens when the brain gets mixed messages about motion and can't reconcile them; your body feels stationary as you sit in the car but your eyes tell your brain that your body is actually moving. When the brain can't figure out how to make sense of these seemingly contradictory messages, the body feels sick. Volvo did a large study of several thousand toddlers and found no difference in the rates of motion sickness between those riding rear-facing and those forward-facing. But statistics don't help when it is your child who is throwing up! Here are some suggestions.

    The most important thing is to make sure your child has the best view possible out the BACK window. Kids and adults who get motion-sick will tell you that looking out the side windows is a quick and easy way to feel very sick, very fast. Why? Things move very quickly out the side windows, which confuses the brain even more. Looking out the back window (for rear-facing kids) or the front window (for forward-facing kids or adults) makes it seem like you are moving slower than the side windows make it seem. For rear-facing kids, sit their car seat as upright as the manufacturer allows and, when possible, remove the vehicle's head rest to give the child the best possible view out the back window. If possible, have the child ride in the center of the back seat as this spot typically gives the best view out the back window. You may want to consider trying to block your child's view out the side windows, since you can't really tell a 2-year-old not to look out the side window! This sunshade will do just that.

    Make sure you aren't inadvertently making your child feel sick; if you are giving him toys or books that require looking down and concentrating, this will likely make him feel sick. Try occupying your child with songs and games that require looking out the window. If you can, travel at naptime or bedtime as your child will not feel sick while sleeping.

    Many parents use food as an activity during long car rides, but for a child who gets motion sick, this will only make matters worse. Feed your child something starchy like bagel or crackers about 1-2 hours before the car ride, and then try to not feed him in the car.

    If you have to take a long trip, talk to your pediatrician about using an anti-nausea medication. You can also try some natural, homeopathic remedies, including accupressure wrist bands (but make sure the one you get is not a choking hazard for a young child), and ginger.

    Some kids are going to get motion sick regardless of the direction they are facing—and the worst part, besides watching your child feel ill, is having to clean the car seat when it is full of vomit. To decrease the clean-up, have your child wear a "puking poncho" that keeps his clothes and the car seat dry.'

    http://www.parenting.com/article/rea...eat-guidelines

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  9. #187
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    Motion sickness can happen in the opposite way, too (as it does with me).
    I get (car) motion sick when I'm not looking out the window, like if I'm looking at my phone or reading something, I start feeling sick within a minute or so. Because for me, my eyes are telling me we're not moving, but my body is telling me we are. I used to get so motion sick in cars as a kid until I learned to just look out the window.

  10. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by HollyGolightly81 View Post
    @nh2489 I found this article by a pediatrician with tips to help your child stay rearfacing if they get motion sickness:

    'As someone who, to this day, still gets very motion-sick, this is a topic near and dear to my heart. Motion sickness happens when the brain gets mixed messages about motion and can't reconcile them; your body feels stationary as you sit in the car but your eyes tell your brain that your body is actually moving. When the brain can't figure out how to make sense of these seemingly contradictory messages, the body feels sick. Volvo did a large study of several thousand toddlers and found no difference in the rates of motion sickness between those riding rear-facing and those forward-facing. But statistics don't help when it is your child who is throwing up! Here are some suggestions.

    The most important thing is to make sure your child has the best view possible out the BACK window. Kids and adults who get motion-sick will tell you that looking out the side windows is a quick and easy way to feel very sick, very fast. Why? Things move very quickly out the side windows, which confuses the brain even more. Looking out the back window (for rear-facing kids) or the front window (for forward-facing kids or adults) makes it seem like you are moving slower than the side windows make it seem. For rear-facing kids, sit their car seat as upright as the manufacturer allows and, when possible, remove the vehicle's head rest to give the child the best possible view out the back window. If possible, have the child ride in the center of the back seat as this spot typically gives the best view out the back window. You may want to consider trying to block your child's view out the side windows, since you can't really tell a 2-year-old not to look out the side window! This sunshade will do just that.

    Make sure you aren't inadvertently making your child feel sick; if you are giving him toys or books that require looking down and concentrating, this will likely make him feel sick. Try occupying your child with songs and games that require looking out the window. If you can, travel at naptime or bedtime as your child will not feel sick while sleeping.

    Many parents use food as an activity during long car rides, but for a child who gets motion sick, this will only make matters worse. Feed your child something starchy like bagel or crackers about 1-2 hours before the car ride, and then try to not feed him in the car.

    If you have to take a long trip, talk to your pediatrician about using an anti-nausea medication. You can also try some natural, homeopathic remedies, including accupressure wrist bands (but make sure the one you get is not a choking hazard for a young child), and ginger.

    Some kids are going to get motion sick regardless of the direction they are facing—and the worst part, besides watching your child feel ill, is having to clean the car seat when it is full of vomit. To decrease the clean-up, have your child wear a "puking poncho" that keeps his clothes and the car seat dry.'

    http://www.parenting.com/article/rea...eat-guidelines
    Thanks for that. I'll see if I can take the head rest off to help the view of the back window and I know with him it is definitely a case of him looking around more when he's rear facing so probably more affected by moving objects etc. That's why he's better forward as I think he tends to just look straight ahead rather than at baby next to him. Luckily I don't need to use the car much now as I get public transport everywhere (thank god he seems ok on that, weirdly as it's often very jerky!) so well just see how it goes.

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  12. #189
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    Quote Originally Posted by nh2489 View Post
    Thanks for that. I'll see if I can take the head rest off to help the view of the back window and I know with him it is definitely a case of him looking around more when he's rear facing so probably more affected by moving objects etc. That's why he's better forward as I think he tends to just look straight ahead rather than at baby next to him. Luckily I don't need to use the car much now as I get public transport everywhere (thank god he seems ok on that, weirdly as it's often very jerky!) so well just see how it goes.
    I don't want to direct this personally as you but just a comment in general. Everyone is on here debating the finer details on the safest child seat and rf vs. ff yet there are no child restraints at all on buses!

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    Quote Originally Posted by babyno1onboard View Post
    I don't want to direct this personally as you but just a comment in general. Everyone is on here debating the finer details on the safest child seat and rf vs. ff yet there are no child restraints at all on buses!
    This is true but bus accidents resulting in fatalities are extremely rare. Just an extra point though, if you're travelling with your Bub in a pram on a bus you are actually required to rear face the pram.... Why? Because it's safer.
    Last edited by A&S; 12-02-2016 at 11:47.

  14. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to A&S For This Useful Post:

    HollyGolightly81  (12-02-2016),nh2489  (12-02-2016),WiseOldOwl  (12-02-2016)


 

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