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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by J37 View Post
    If I served up hommus, crudites and "fruit-kebabs" at a 5-year-olds party, I would feel like Mrs. Grinch! (Well Dr. Grinch, to be correct).

    Party food is awesome!

    Sent from my SM-N910G using The Bub Hub mobile app
    I make my own awesome sausage rolls (500g beef mince, 500g sausage mince, cup of bread crumbs, squirt of bbq and tomato sauce, fried onion, some mixed herbs and garlic). They freeze and you can make them up well in advance.

    Oddly enough I had plenty of stock standard party food out last birthday and my sister made watermelon triangles on a stick and they were the hit! Every kid and grown up had a water melon stick in their hand. I was really surprised.

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  3. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by ICanDream View Post
    My DH insists on kids eating what's on their plate and I hate it! I now give them smaller portions that I know they can finish and then let them come back for more. I'm an adult and can't stand being served mounds of food and pressured to eat it, surely kids are no different.
    This is a legitimate way of getting fussy kids to eat healthier and what everyone else is eating.

    So yes I expect my DD to eat everything healthy in her plate before she can have fruit or yoghurt, otherwise she wouldn't eat her 'dinner' and skip straight to the fruit and yoghurt.

    Having said that I never give her more than she could possibly eat.

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  5. #53
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    If my kids don't try dinner they get nothing else for the rest of the evening. If they try it and don't like it they can have veg or fruit.

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  7. #54
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    I was very strict on my daughters diet until she was about 18 months old and started noticing if another kid was having cake and she was having fruit. I didn't want her to feel left out or different so I relaxed my rules. I make really healthy dinners 6/7 nights per week and make sure I make a passing comment that this is really good growing food because her and her cousin are obsessed with checking to see who is taller. She has learnt about "sometimes foods" at school so when she asks for a donut / chocolate etc. I remind her that she has already had X today which is a sometimes food so I'd like her to have a "growing food" if she's hungry, like some fruit or cheese or yogurt. I always have the fruit bowl full and in plain sight so she sees that first when she wants a snack so usually will ask for something she can see in there.

    I am still very strict on what she drinks though, she only drinks water and milk but she's not a big milk drinker so might have 1-2 cups per week. When she's sick I allow apple juice to encourage her to drink.

    I try not to make a big deal out of unhealthy food but equally don't make a big fuss out of healthy food. I just let her know if it's a sometimes food or a growing food and so far she's pretty good at making good choices. She has my parents conned into buying her a donut when they have her twice per week but she knows there are some different rules at nanny and poppy's house to what we have at home.

    So yes after all that, I think you need to educate your child but don't make a huge deal about food.

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  9. #55
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    I dont think there is such a thing as 'too healthy', but it can be too restrictive. I try to do 90/10 - 90% healthy, 10% treats. Some weeks its 80/20! But its all about balance,for my kids and myself. Its interesting to hear versions of what treats different kids have & havent tried. My kids have not yet had soft drink, nutella, or a chocolate bar. They tried their first kinder suprise egg the other day (my oldest is 5). But they have had macdonalds - I've gotten them 'chippees' plenty of times from there! I dont see macdonalds as any worse than any other junk foods. Its interesting how we rate the 'badness' of foods. I know people who say they would never give their kids macdonalds, but would give thrm lollypops,chocolate, & soft drink every week or two. I just try to find a healthy balance, never say never, & try to develop a good healthy relationship with food

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  11. #56
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    I also find it interesting that lots of BLW advocates then list proudly the foods their kids haven't tried or refuse to try (that they deem as unhealthy). It's not directed at anyone here specifically, the worst one I know for this is IRL.

    She was proudly bragging on FB how the GP offered her 3 year old a lolly at the end of their appointment and master 3 declared "yuk! No that's sugar!". Yet we'd been at their house for afternoon tea the week before and you could barely tear the kid away from the fruit flan (covered in that sugar gel glaze) her hubby had bought to share. Um, yeah, your kid hates sugar, suuuuure...

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  13. #57
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    Default Do you think you can make your child's diet too healthy?

    I'd much rather a kid say, yes please, it's not every day I get to eat a yummy lollipop! That's a better sign your kid understands nutrition
    Last edited by A-Squared; 07-02-2016 at 09:12.

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  15. #58
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    Gah, I wish I could say my 2 1/2 year old eats too healthily. I love to cook and I would love to bake and create balanced meals for her. Unfortunately she is a nightmare eater and will largely only eat a few bites of packaged crap. We've been to specialists, feeding clinics etc and it's only getting worse. At the moment, it's a case of if it has calories and she'll eat it, she can have it.
    So to all the mums out there who can say their kids have a healthy relationship with food, you are doing an amazing job! Honestly, it is one of the most basic and important gifts you can give your kids. Obviously my kid is an exception and not hugely relevant to this thread, but I do think it sounds like everyone who has contributed has the balance right re healthy food/ occasional treats.

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  17. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stretched View Post
    I also find it interesting that lots of BLW advocates then list proudly the foods their kids haven't tried or refuse to try (that they deem as unhealthy). It's not directed at anyone here specifically, the worst one I know for this is IRL.

    She was proudly bragging on FB how the GP offered her 3 year old a lolly at the end of their appointment and master 3 declared "yuk! No that's sugar!". Yet we'd been at their house for afternoon tea the week before and you could barely tear the kid away from the fruit flan (covered in that sugar gel glaze) her hubby had bought to share. Um, yeah, your kid hates sugar, suuuuure...
    My husbands cousin is like this with her daughter. Swears black and blue that she isn't into junk food at all and will only take healthy options, but we were in a food court with them once and we had bought all pieces of fruit for our kids and a 6 pack of nuggets to share as a treat to go with it. She bought her daughter some fancy rice dish, which my kids ended up eating because her daughter took all the nuggets haha.

    My kids love fruit. In fact, I'm sure at least some of you would be horrified at the sheer amount of fruit our house goes through weekly. So our rule at dinner if that if they haven't finished their plate (with exceptions such as Mr 5 pulling the tomato out of his salad because he doesn't like it) they must not be hungry and don't need the fruit. They are never forced to finish their dinner but they don't get anything after. We know what foods they eat so cook dinner appropriately and we are a bit more lenient if trying something completely new. I don't like the idea of forcing them to eat if they are full. My parents did this when I was a child and sometimes my stomach would be so sore and I felt like vomiting but would still be made to eat.

    I had an extremely unhealthy relationship with food as a child as honestly, my parents just didn't care. For a a few years my mother would send meat pies with me and tell me to have the canteen ladies heat them up but after a while the canteen ladies got jack of it so I just sat there eating an uncooked/semi frozen meat pie because I had nothing else. Eventually I stopped eating lunch at all and would just throw the meat pies in the bin. I was never given break fast before school either. And nowadays, yes I am fat, but a lot of that I would attribute more to the fact that I still don't really eat breakfast and lunch. So I don't want my kids to have that same attitude.

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  19. #60
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    Hugs, my DD is the same, it's tough. You hear all these stories of kids who actually eat vegetables and I wonder why can't she just eat them too!

    My DS isn't fussy but he doesn't have much of an appetite and is under the 3rd percentile for weight (but tracking up and slowly getting towards the 3% line.

    My GP assures me my DD will eventually grow out of it and become more adventurous but until it becomes a problem for her health, just keep offering until it clicks.

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