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  1. #11
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    Default Do you think you can make your child's diet too healthy?

    Quote Originally Posted by teenie View Post
    Yep I think it can be overdone for sure. Same goes for the other direction obviously.

    My mum was a great cook and baker so we had homemade treats, cooked breakfasts, homemade lunchbox food and delicious, nutritious dinners. We also had icecream (not every night) and milo etc etc. I have no hang ups from my childhood eating.

    I'll happily raise my hand and admit I'm one of those mums who occasionally gets an eye roll about how we eat. I don't care, but I find it interesting. I think I've found the balance. It's taken time but I'm hopeful I'm on the right path. My basic rule of thumb is 80-90% non-packaged or processed foods at home, and 100% none of those in lunchboxes (exception of plain rice crackers).

    Here's where the balance comes in - we eat take out once a week, kids get tuckshop a few times a term, they can eat what they want at a party/someone else's house, grandma feeds them purely junk food and lives 3 minutes away, we go out for icecream etc sometimes...the list goes on.).
    This is how I like to go about things.

    There is no junk or processed food in our house, no breakfast cereal either. I try to have no junk at all in lunch boxes but will have a home cooked baked item where I can control what's in it. But on birthdays, parties, special occasions, Nanny's house etc I am happy for them to have treats and enjoy them. We have fish and chips on Sunday nights as a rule.

    I hope we are teaching that if every day food is healthy then you can have treats when appropriate and that's ok.

    I still get the eye rolls and comments from extended family and friends but I am learning to ignore!!
    Last edited by ArthurDent; 06-02-2016 at 16:04.

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  3. #12
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    I did when I first had DD. No carby snacks, no oils or butter, basically only fruit for a snack or yoghurt. Then she stopped gaining weight and I had to start adding it all to her diet and bulking up her calorie intake. I get now it now though. I'm now more mindful that their diets now are setting up their eating habits for life and we tend try and keep things low in unnecessary sugar and salt. ( never add it to anything etc).

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  5. #13
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    Not such a straight forward question. I think 'making' a child eat a certain way can lead to problems on its own. Educating a child to make healthy choices is much better, IMO. I think denying children certain foods constantly can also cause problems. If my DS is at a party I let him eat anything he wants - and when he complains he feels sick after too much sugar etc I educate him as to why - ie eating too many jelly beans will make your tummy hurt! So next time I warn him not to eat too many.

    That said, a healthy diet starts in the home and if your whole family eat healthy this will undoubtedly rub off onto your children and they'll make healthy choices of their own.

    My mum thinks we force DS to eat too healthy. But that's because we have different ideas of what is healthy, DS thinks sweetened yoghurt is a treat (which it is in our house) whereas my mum would see this as super healthy everyday food. And whilst I've never taken him to (insert fast food chain), that's more because we never eat there. He gets his fair share of 'not so healthy' food such as Thai takeaway or fish n chips occasionally.

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    A healthy diet and a healthy relationship with food are two very different things. So no I don't think a child's diet can be too healthy but you can feed them a healthy diet while also teaching them to have an unhealthy relationship with food. X

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    My experience is yes. Grew up with a super restrictive super healthy diet. Was also the kid at every party stuffing myself at the lolly table until making myself physically sick. You can only control what your children eat for so long so a healthy attitude towards food and understanding moderation is just as important as providing them a balanced healthy diet.

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    Default Do you think you can make your child's diet too healthy?

    Too healthy , no - too strict yes
    I was strict with DS until about 2.5 and yes it did annoy some family ( read grandparents who wanted to give him ice cream etc ) but I wanted him not to try any processed foods until I knew he had really good eating habits , then I relaxed a bit and still stayed strict at home ( had no junk food in the house etc) but when we go out for dinner and order dessert he'd have something, at parties he could eat what he wanted and now at 5 he's allowed a lemonade when we go out for dinner!

    Food should be fun , I love trying new restaurants and new recipes and thankfully he is the same

    At home I don't make him eat anything, he's only offered healthy food and he can eat as much or little as he wants we've always put out a bowl of veggies every night for all of us to eat so again he thinks that's normal , he knows there are sometimes foods and party foods but he also knows which veggies contain which vitamins and that to be strong and healthy you should eat them!

    I think banning bad food always is over the top as you want your child to learn that healthy food is the norm, I cringed the first time he had ham at a friends house but didn't want to make a big deal over it as I know he rarely gets it ( I do put my foot down with Devon and chicken loaf and those other mystery meat things!) I will probably cringe the first time he try's McDonald's , I'm just hoping he won't like it which is probable - we used to go out every Monday after swimming lessons to the local shopping centre and eat at the food court with a few friends and their kids and he always chose either a falafel kebab or chicken toasted sandwich as that's what he's always had , a few times one of the kids got McDonald's and he never even took much notice or asked for it as to him it didn't look appealing

    He's never liked potatoes of any kind, people think I've banned him from eating hot chips which I haven't he just doesn't like potato!
    I don't eat red meat and eat lots of fish and vegetarian style meals so he's used to those and will always choose fish over meat when offered a choice , I don't believe in giving him "kids meals" and when we got out he eats what we do

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elijahs Mum View Post
    Too healthy , no - too strict yes
    I was strict with DS until about 2.5 and yes it did annoy some family ( read grandparents who wanted to give him ice cream etc ) but I wanted him not to try any processed foods until I knew he had really good eating habits , then I relaxed a bit and still stayed strict at home ( had no junk food in the house etc) but when we go out for dinner and order dessert he'd have something, at parties he could eat what he wanted and now at 5 he's allowed a lemonade when we go out for dinner!

    Food should be fun , I love trying new restaurants and new recipes and thankfully he is the same

    At home I don't make him eat anything, he's only offered healthy food and he can eat as much or little as he wants we've always put out a bowl of veggies every night for all of us to eat so again he thinks that's normal , he knows there are sometimes foods and party foods but he also knows which veggies contain which vitamins and that to be strong and healthy you should eat them!

    I think banning bad food always is over the top as you want your child to learn that healthy food is the norm, I cringed the first time he had ham at a friends house but didn't want to make a big deal over it as I know he rarely gets it ( I do put my foot down with Devon and chicken loaf and those other mystery meat things!) I will probably cringe the first time he try's McDonald's , I'm just hoping he won't like it which is probable - we used to go out every Monday after swimming lessons to the local shopping centre and eat at the food court with a few friends and their kids and he always chose either a falafel kebab or chicken toasted sandwich as that's what he's always had , a few times one of the kids got McDonald's and he never even took much notice or asked for it as to him it didn't look appealing

    He's never liked potatoes of any kind, people think I've banned him from eating hot chips which I haven't he just doesn't like potato!
    I don't eat red meat and eat lots of fish and vegetarian style meals so he's used to those and will always choose fish over meat when offered a choice , I don't believe in giving him "kids meals" and when we got out he eats what we do
    I really love reading your posts about food and your attitude towards kids and their eating habits. They always resonate really strongly with me.
    Last edited by Moxy; 06-02-2016 at 17:23.

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  15. #18
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    In a way yes. I'm not having a go at anyone but I recall a hubber keeping their child home from school as they were having an excursion to maccas that day. I think kids should be able to join in with their friends. When diets impacting on living your life it's probably too far in my opinion.

    I struggle to find the balance some days. I think they have too many treats but I'm trying to improve it. Growing up we were given chips for morning tea, I'm not that bad!

    I'm just trying to explain to them why some choices are better than others.

    My DD1 is 4 and gains weight REALLY easily. I try not to be too hard on her but I also know every time she's seen eating a sugary food she's judged much harsher than a lean child eating the same. DD2 eats the same foods yet has a different body type.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elijahs Mum View Post
    Too healthy , no - too strict yes
    I was strict with DS until about 2.5 and yes it did annoy some family ( read grandparents who wanted to give him ice cream etc ) but I wanted him not to try any processed foods until I knew he had really good eating habits , then I relaxed a bit and still stayed strict at home ( had no junk food in the house etc) but when we go out for dinner and order dessert he'd have something, at parties he could eat what he wanted and now at 5 he's allowed a lemonade when we go out for dinner!

    Food should be fun , I love trying new restaurants and new recipes and thankfully he is the same

    At home I don't make him eat anything, he's only offered healthy food and he can eat as much or little as he wants we've always put out a bowl of veggies every night for all of us to eat so again he thinks that's normal , he knows there are sometimes foods and party foods but he also knows which veggies contain which vitamins and that to be strong and healthy you should eat them!

    I think banning bad food always is over the top as you want your child to learn that healthy food is the norm, I cringed the first time he had ham at a friends house but didn't want to make a big deal over it as I know he rarely gets it ( I do put my foot down with Devon and chicken loaf and those other mystery meat things!) I will probably cringe the first time he try's McDonald's , I'm just hoping he won't like it which is probable - we used to go out every Monday after swimming lessons to the local shopping centre and eat at the food court with a few friends and their kids and he always chose either a falafel kebab or chicken toasted sandwich as that's what he's always had , a few times one of the kids got McDonald's and he never even took much notice or asked for it as to him it didn't look appealing

    He's never liked potatoes of any kind, people think I've banned him from eating hot chips which I haven't he just doesn't like potato!
    I don't eat red meat and eat lots of fish and vegetarian style meals so he's used to those and will always choose fish over meat when offered a choice , I don't believe in giving him "kids meals" and when we got out he eats what we do
    I like this a lot ^^^^
    My first is due in a few weeks and I've been thinking about how we are going to encourage healthy eating. We are both vegetarians and rarely eat processed foods. I love the idea of strictly eating healthy food for a few years and slowly becoming more relaxed when our DD is a little older.

    I've seen our 1 year old niece stuff muffins, sugary cereal, jam covered croissants, processed meats, cordial and ice cream in her mouth and it makes me cringe. She is bonkers! So a blanket 'no crap food' rule will work best for us too I think.

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    rainbow road is offline look at the stars, look how they shine for you
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedCreamingSoda View Post
    A healthy diet and a healthy relationship with food are two very different things. So no I don't think a child's diet can be too healthy but you can feed them a healthy diet while also teaching them to have an unhealthy relationship with food. X
    Totally agree with this.


 

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