+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 64
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    4,109
    Thanks
    1,604
    Thanked
    2,085
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts

    Default Do you think you can make your child's diet too healthy?

    I have my own food issues and am constantly endeavoring to strike a balance when it comes to what I feed my kids. I get quite anxious when I see/read parents proudly declaring their child has never had [insert junk food of choice here] due to the restrictions placed on food growing up. But I don't know if my experience is unique because I was raised in an abusive household, therefore the food was just yet another way for my dad to exert his control over us, and as such I have a negative association with "health food".

    Interested to hear other people's experiences and how it has impacted their eating as an adult.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Jerilderie
    Posts
    1,050
    Thanks
    487
    Thanked
    519
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Anything can be done to excess.

    I grew up in my younger years of in boxes of what was fresh fruit until it was thrown out. It was at this point my dad would bring it home. If I got caught eating 'new' box before the old one was finished I knew about it

    When it was just us and mum we had very pain food.

    She would get herself silver side, ham and chocolate but that was mostly hers. When the meat got the hues of rhe rainbow and was slimy then we were allowed to have it.

    Im fussy with food now. If the I dont knowthe meat was bought that day or yesterday I wont eat it or give it to my kids.

    If there is a hint of something foing off the whole lot gets chucked.

    I let my kids have treats in moderation. They also have plenty of outdoor play. There is a trampoline, large yard, bikes and skooters and we frequent the park.

    When
    Last edited by DaveTTC; 06-02-2016 at 15:26.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to DaveTTC For This Useful Post:

    Stretched  (06-02-2016)

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    936
    Thanks
    651
    Thanked
    377
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    I think it depends on how it's done. The main question for me is 'is the child making their own decisions and choosing the healthy option or are these decisions being forced into said child'. This would also depend on age and maturity level on child but to me eating healthy is not what my son is physically putting in his mouth but what he is choosing to put in his mouth

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to azelqra For This Useful Post:

    Stretched  (06-02-2016)

  6. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Sunshine Coast
    Posts
    2,963
    Thanks
    2,383
    Thanked
    2,071
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I'm not a dietician and I think anyone with intelligence knows what is good or not for their child's diet. My kids are made to eat vegetables, fruit and the good stuff, however they get their share of crap food too. I'm a good parent, not perfect but I take notice of what I'm feeding them.

    Growing up, I was made to sit there until everything was gone. My father was a fabulous cook but we were made to eat offal. Tripe, kidneys and liver. Yuck!!!!

    After my folks divorced we were brought up by mum and she was not such a great cook. I was a fat kid, I don't think she gave a crap really what we ate.

    Now that I am an adult, I enjoy cooking (not at the moment being heavily pregnant, can't really be @rsed lol) I make the kids eat vegetables, I like to make my lasagne from scratch and try new things every so often but there is no way I would ever make them eat offal, no chance in hell lol.
    Last edited by Marchbundle; 06-02-2016 at 18:36.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Marchbundle For This Useful Post:

    Stretched  (06-02-2016)

  8. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    3,708
    Thanks
    893
    Thanked
    2,784
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I don't think you can make your child's diet too healthy, no. One can live a healthy, happy life without eating any junk food, but it's pretty hard to live a healthy life eating only junk food. Controlling your child's food intake is very different to educating kids on good, healthy food choices and providing those options instead of filling the pantry with crap for them to choose from.

    I grew up eating pretty ordinary food, the usual meat and veg, occasional packet of crisps, odd soft drink here and there. I was skinny as anything growing up and still developed an ED at 19. Nothing to do with food and everything to do with bullying at school, a couple of thoughtless comments from dad and a general self loathing. My relationship with food is terrible, but not in the sense that I feel controlled by specific foods, more that I feel controlled by what I eat in general in terms of caloric intak and the impact that will have on my weight. It's hard to explain.

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to Moxy For This Useful Post:

    Stretched  (06-02-2016)

  10. #6
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    7,829
    Thanks
    5,045
    Thanked
    4,430
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 17/4/15100 Posts in a week
    I really think it depends on the child to be honest.

    Some kids who have never had sugar for example would go crazy at a party with sweet treats while others wouldn't eat anything sugary as they wouldn't like the taste as they don't usually have sugar.

    Likewise there are kids who eat a lot of processed foods or high fat foods like lots of take away and lots of bad carbs and sugars and they're not overweight yet others are quite overweight.

    Likewise some kids will eat anything you give them, others are super fussy. In my opinion you can't make kids like certain foods, if you have a child who is fussy it isn't because of anything the parent is going they just have a fussy kid. Just like the parent who has kids who love to munch on vegetables and fruit and prefer it over sugary or fatty foods and eats a well balanced diet or well anything they're served is due to that child being adventurous and have more refined taste buds.

    It's rarely due to what a parent does or doesn't do.

    I went to a seminar about feeding and they said it is a parents role to offer the food and the child's role to eat it. I just believe in everything in moderation and not cutting anything out of kids diets (well other than caffeine) and offer treats occasionally. But if you have a fussy eater limit treats and find healthy foods that they will eat. So what if they only eat fruit, bread, pasta, yoghurt and chicken (for example).

  11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to A-Squared For This Useful Post:

    binnielici  (06-02-2016),Stretched  (06-02-2016)

  12. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    4,412
    Thanks
    508
    Thanked
    1,060
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Yep I think it can be overdone for sure. Same goes for the other direction obviously.

    My mum was a great cook and baker so we had homemade treats, cooked breakfasts, homemade lunchbox food and delicious, nutritious dinners. We also had icecream (not every night) and milo etc etc. I have no hang ups from my childhood eating.

    I'll happily raise my hand and admit I'm one of those mums who occasionally gets an eye roll about how we eat. I don't care, but I find it interesting. I think I've found the balance. It's taken time but I'm hopeful I'm on the right path. My basic rule of thumb is 80-90% non-packaged or processed foods at home, and 100% none of those in lunchboxes (exception of plain rice crackers).

    Here's where the balance comes in - we eat take out once a week, kids get tuckshop a few times a term, they can eat what they want at a party/someone else's house, grandma feeds them purely junk food and lives 3 minutes away, we go out for icecream etc sometimes...the list goes on. My eldest went to junior youth for the first time last night - he said they had Coles Anzac biscuits for a snack (he loves them) and sausage in white bread for dinner (he loves white bread!) All good! Also, when we go camping (every long weekend of the year and some school holidays) the kids come on the 'camping shop' and choose some treats or a sugary breakfast cereal or something for the trip.

    Concluding my novel, I'm seeing no signs of food issues in my kids thus far. They happily eat what is on offer at home and happily eat other foods elsewhere (not like rabid animals - just like normal kids).

  13. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to teenie For This Useful Post:

    binnielici  (06-02-2016),HeavenBlue  (07-02-2016),Moxy  (06-02-2016),SandGroper  (07-02-2016),Stretched  (06-02-2016),Summer  (06-02-2016)

  14. #8
    TheGooch's Avatar
    TheGooch is offline Winner 2014 - Newbie of the Year
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    4,770
    Thanks
    7,983
    Thanked
    4,118
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    I think a diet can't be too healthy providing the diet is actually healthy.
    What I mean is, if the diet is balanced, full of the right amounts of fruit, veg, grains/cereals, lean meats (or their alternatives) and legumes, dairy and fats then great.
    But when It's the latest fad packaged up as healthy then I think the world's gone mad!

  15. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to TheGooch For This Useful Post:

    CakeyMumma  (07-02-2016),Stretched  (06-02-2016)

  16. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    8,544
    Thanks
    1,351
    Thanked
    2,307
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    I think when a parent goes overboard with anything it can become an issue.

    And I agree with a previous poster who said that food can be a control issue

    When my parents divorced I went to live with my father, he was extremely fussy with what we ate ie vegetarian but ate eggs. No sugar and I mean no sugar and it really was just painful.

    Everything in moderation .

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to sunnyflower For This Useful Post:

    Stretched  (06-02-2016)

  18. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    6,864
    Thanks
    4,773
    Thanked
    4,210
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week

    Default Do you think you can make your child's diet too healthy?

    I grew up eating crap. my mum was a shocking cook. we ate fruit & veg but the veg was always so badly overlooked I question whether there was any good stuff left in it.

    when my dad went away for work, she'd just feed us fast food. I remember one week it was maccas, hjs, KFC, red rooster then by the fifth day we were begging for no more fast food.

    I can't say I really looked forward to meal times at home. I started cooking my own food once I was old enough just to exert some control over what I consumed. I guess that's when I learned to cook.

    never had any body issues (beyond the usual I'm ugly teen angst) nor food issues. I was lucky I had a fast metabolism and the fast food/crap we were fed never made itself evident.

    I do think it's possible to be too healthy. I see the way some people carry on and it's bordering on obsession. I like to consume mindfully. I have no issue eating crap from time to time but I'm mindful of what I put in my body and always ensure the bad is more than balanced out with good stuff. I'm not going to crucify myself if I caved in and had a cheeseburger. I just can't be bothered obsessing.

    I expect the same attitude will be carried over to my children's dining habits.
    Last edited by turquoisecoast; 06-02-2016 at 15:55.

  19. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to turquoisecoast For This Useful Post:

    Marchbundle  (06-02-2016),Stretched  (06-02-2016)


 

Similar Threads

  1. What do you it in your child's lunch box??
    By Wheaty in forum General Chat
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 29-01-2016, 08:46
  2. Toy for 6yr old boy. What's your child's favourite?
    By 2BlueBirds in forum General Chat
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 27-08-2015, 10:04
  3. What were your child's first words?
    By BH-bubhub in forum Development Stages
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 16-02-2015, 14:29

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Nice Pak Products
Australian Made and Owned. The Baby U Goat Milk Skincare range is enriched with soothing goats milk sourced from country, Victoria. Goat's milk has a pH level close to that of our own skin and contains natural sources of amino acids and vitamins.
sales & new stuffsee all
Bub Hub Sales Listing
HAVING A SALE? Let parents know about it with a Bub Hub Sales listing. Listings are featured on our well trafficked Sales Page + selected randomly to appear on EVERY page
featured supporter
Impressionable Kids
Impressionable Kids are Australia's leader in framed children's memorabilia and specialise in framed baby hand and feet sculptures. With franchise locations throughout Australia you can be assured you will receive a quality handmade product with a lifetime warranty on all frames.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!