+ Reply to Thread
Page 9 of 11 FirstFirst ... 7891011 LastLast
Results 81 to 90 of 107
  1. #81
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    266
    Thanks
    374
    Thanked
    352
    Reviews
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    First of all - what a difficult job you have. Thankyou for helping the community in the way you do.

    On the thread side of things I think there's a difference in removing life support and giving someone (who could theoretically last months or years) an injection.
    Fair point!

  2. #82
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    856
    Thanks
    51
    Thanked
    236
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Yes.
    My brother died from motor neurone disease and I was with him every day at the end. He suffered so much.
    At the end he chose permanent sedation which effectively was euthanasia. He woke up in the morning, his wife showered him, he had breakfast, we all chatted and he chose the time when he was sedated. It took his young, strong heart days to stop beating.

  3. #83
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    17,747
    Thanks
    5,085
    Thanked
    8,691
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Awards:
    Past Moderator - Thank you
    100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by beancounter View Post
    Yes.
    My brother died from motor neurone disease and I was with him every day at the end. He suffered so much.
    At the end he chose permanent sedation which effectively was euthanasia. He woke up in the morning, his wife showered him, he had breakfast, we all chatted and he chose the time when he was sedated. It took his young, strong heart days to stop beating.
    I am so so sorry. MND is just so cruel.

  4. #84
    SuperGranny's Avatar
    SuperGranny is offline Worlds best grandma! Winner 2012 - Most Helpful Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    sunshine coast qld
    Posts
    6,140
    Thanks
    4,541
    Thanked
    2,719
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    i have an understanding, that there is Qld regulation/ legislation, that allows medical people to administer basically an overdose, to a terminally ill person without any threat of legal action. i could be wrong. For myself i do think i would rather die as, and when my time comes. I dont want my life extended by extra ordinary measures, and i dont want it ended by anyone making a choice for me. My father died of cancer, long, painful, death over about 9 months, my mother died in about 2 hrs from a heart attack, if i could choose, for myself. my mother had the best deal... hugs for everyone who might not be comfortable with this topic. marie

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to SuperGranny For This Useful Post:

    A-Squared  (06-02-2016),misskittyfantastico  (06-02-2016)

  6. #85
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,839
    Thanks
    6,199
    Thanked
    16,883
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Bubhub Blogger - Thanks100 Posts in a week
    In the absence of sound mind I would like to see the ability to add a clause before that stage is lost. We are all talking about physical suffering, which is shocking and obviously a very good reason to end your own life. But I am much more terrified of dementia than cancer. Not knowing my husband of 50 years, not knowing my kids and grandkids. For me, that is a fate worse than death and I would want to end my life once it got to that stage.

    Dh was close to his maternal grandparents but his nanna ended up with Alzheimer's. She went into a nursing home and he stopped visiting. He told me she wasn't his nan anymore, just this empty shell living in her body. She didn't know the love of her life of 60 years, nor her kids. Her husband, Dh's pop was beyond devastated

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to delirium For This Useful Post:

    Gentoo  (07-02-2016)

  8. #86
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Newcastle
    Posts
    2,276
    Thanks
    715
    Thanked
    1,109
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    In the absence of sound mind I would like to see the ability to add a clause before that stage is lost. We are all talking about physical suffering, which is shocking and obviously a very good reason to end your own life. But I am much more terrified of dementia than cancer. Not knowing my husband of 50 years, not knowing my kids and grandkids. For me, that is a fate worse than death and I would want to end my life once it got to that stage.

    Dh was close to his maternal grandparents but his nanna ended up with Alzheimer's. She went into a nursing home and he stopped visiting. He told me she wasn't his nan anymore, just this empty shell living in her body. She didn't know the love of her life of 60 years, nor her kids. Her husband, Dh's pop was beyond devastated
    That is very sad and is heartbreaking to see. Often we do palliate dementia patients who have a host of other medical problems as well if theyd already had a living will refusing medical treatment when of sound mind。 often medical problems take over we dont treat and we do treat with pain killers when they are in pain and distressed. Sadly there are often family members who go against the wishes to keep them alive at all costs for their benefit as they are not ready to say goodbye, we have transferred many patients to icu in last 12 months who needed comfort measures but whose spouses, kids and grandkids werent ready to say goodbye to and it is just so cruel theyd already decided their fate.

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to wobblermummy For This Useful Post:

    rosey82  (07-02-2016)

  10. #87
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,280
    Thanks
    665
    Thanked
    651
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default Euthanasia - Yes or No?

    When we talk about 'withdrawal of medical treatment', what does that look like? I expect if it's a ventilator it would be over quickly, but what if the patient can breathe on their own and it's a feeding tube that you're withdrawing? That's just euthanasia by starving them to death isn't it?

    Personally, I think that's b.arbaric. The decision has already been made that treatment is futile and it's in the best interests of the patient to die. I think their lives should be able to be ended quickly and painlessly.

  11. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Sally1981 For This Useful Post:

    A-Squared  (07-02-2016),Gentoo  (07-02-2016),PomPoms  (07-02-2016),rosey82  (07-02-2016),Silver flute  (07-02-2016),TheGooch  (07-02-2016),turquoisecoast  (07-02-2016)

  12. #88
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,916
    Thanks
    637
    Thanked
    2,324
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Sally1981 View Post
    When we talk about 'withdrawal of medical treatment', what does that look like? I expect if it's a ventilator it would be over quickly, but what if the patient can breathe on their own and it's a feeding tube that you're withdrawing? That's just euthanasia by starving them to death isn't it?

    Personally, I think that's b.arbaric. The decision has already been made that treatment is futile and it's in the best interests of the patient to die. I think their lives should be able to be ended quickly and painlessly.
    I haven't ever seen "withdrawal of treatment" solely involve cessation of feeding, but admittedly I haven't worked much in long-term aged care or rehab type wards.

    In ICU, mostly it involves switching off a ventilator or infusions of vasopressors (drugs to maintain blood pressure at a functional level). And yes, these measures are very quick. And in these cases the patient has been on intravenous sedation and/or analgesia anyway, so would not have been conscious. Sedation/analgesia is not stopped until the patient has arrested (died of cardio-respiratory arrest).

    Withdrawal of medical treatment is quite different to euthanasia. The first is passive, the latter an active process. Well it is in my mind.

    Sent from my SM-N910G using The Bub Hub mobile app

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to J37 For This Useful Post:

    VicPark  (07-02-2016)

  14. #89
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,280
    Thanks
    665
    Thanked
    651
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by J37 View Post
    I haven't ever seen "withdrawal of treatment" solely involve cessation of feeding, but admittedly I haven't worked much in long-term aged care or rehab type wards.

    In ICU, mostly it involves switching off a ventilator or infusions of vasopressors (drugs to maintain blood pressure at a functional level). And yes, these measures are very quick. And in these cases the patient has been on intravenous sedation and/or analgesia anyway, so would not have been conscious. Sedation/analgesia is not stopped until the patient has arrested (died of cardio-respiratory arrest).

    Withdrawal of medical treatment is quite different to euthanasia. The first is passive, the latter an active process. Well it is in my mind.

    Sent from my SM-N910G using The Bub Hub mobile app
    See that sounds quick and humane.

    I was thinking more of patients in a permanent persistent vegetative state whose only life sustaining treatment is a feeding tube (such as the Terry Shiavo and Tony Bland cases).

    Withdrawal of treatment for those patients can only be withdrawal of the feeding tube until they starve to death.

    I just think that's a good example of where 'active' euthanasia is the only reasonable option once the assessment has been made that they will never recover.

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to Sally1981 For This Useful Post:

    A-Squared  (07-02-2016)

  16. #90
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    3,362
    Thanks
    532
    Thanked
    1,195
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by J37 View Post
    I haven't ever seen "withdrawal of treatment" solely involve cessation of feeding, but admittedly I haven't worked much in long-term aged care or rehab type wards.

    In ICU, mostly it involves switching off a ventilator or infusions of vasopressors (drugs to maintain blood pressure at a functional level). And yes, these measures are very quick. And in these cases the patient has been on intravenous sedation and/or analgesia anyway, so would not have been conscious. Sedation/analgesia is not stopped until the patient has arrested (died of cardio-respiratory arrest).

    Withdrawal of medical treatment is quite different to euthanasia. The first is passive, the latter an active process. Well it is in my mind.

    Sent from my SM-N910G using The Bub Hub mobile app
    It does happen in those settings as a slow and painful process. I've seen it professionally and also personally. Recently a friend had a severe hypoxic brain injury. It took a few days to prove that she was 'brain dead'. It then took family another week to agree on turning off life support. She had a trachy by this point. She had recovered enough after this week that she had resumed spontaneous respiration and was on minimal medical support aside from anti epileptics. When they decided to withdrawal treatment but it took a week of withholding nutrition for her to die.

    I don't see this as euthanasia- just withdrawal of treatment, but it certainly wasn't quick.


 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Bamboo Lulu
Super soft, fun prints & basics for baby, made from bamboo & organic cotton plus non-toxic wooden toys. • Hypoallergenic - perfect for eczema relief • Everything needed to shop for a baby shower • 10% off + FREE gift with purchase. Use code BUBHUB
sales & new stuffsee all
Bub Hub Sales Listing
HAVING A SALE? Let parents know about it with a Bub Hub Sales listing. Listings are featured on our well trafficked Sales Page + selected randomly to appear on EVERY page
featured supporter
Little Rugby NSW
Catch, weave, chase, run, but most of all have FUN! Little Rugby runs a NSW network of fun, safe and non-contact footy classes for BOYS and GIRLS aged 2yrs – 7th birthday.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!