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  1. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Probably not, but that's why I would never choose that profession. There are many nurses and drs who would. Bc they see it as not 'killing someone' but allowing a person some peace from the pain. A decision the patient makes of their own free will.

    I was more trying to understand your objection to euthanasia. Why don't you agree with it?
    I don't think there are "many doctors and nurses who would" at all. Quite the opposite!!

    Sent from my SM-N910G using The Bub Hub mobile app

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  3. #72
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    My father had bowel cancer a few years ago. He deteriorated very quickly once it had spread through his body including his brain. One night we were
    all asked to come up to the hospital, he was no longer responsive to us and had started what they called a 'death rattle' in his breathing. The nurse asked if we would like to administer something to stop this pain, we did and she gave him an injection. He still seemed to be in intense pain, the nurse then asked if we would like her to administer another injection, she hinted that it would stop his suffering without saying it outright. We agreed and then once she gave the second injection, he stopped breathing and was finally at peace. We were extremely thankful to that nurse.....and yes I completely agree with euthanasia both before and after that moment. Seeing my father in that sought of pain was horrendous and I would never expect anyone to suffer like that and would hope someone would show me some mercy if ever I was.

  4. #73
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    Thing is that it's already happening via legal means. It just has no 'euthanasia specific' regulation. They do it via the doctrine of double effect.

    All legalising euthanasia would do is regulate a practice that is already happening. Instead of painkillers, we could have access to a more effective drug. Instead of a conversation about ending a life being carried out by innuendo, patients and their families could talk openly about it with their treaters.

  5. #74
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    Yes, without reading all of the replies. Without a doubt.

  6. #75
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    Yes as a nurse who has cared for so many palliative patients through a very cruel and drawn out process. Patients can often be unconscious for days before they die only breathing because their body wont give in to their wishes. I am a christian but believe my patients have the.right to make their own decisions. No one refuses to take medications or have surgeries that save their lives, same as we don't give dementia patients a choice often and they are kept alive alot longer then they should naturally be alive for because its not playing god but are happy to say euthanising is playing god.

    I do not want to be kept alive in pain, struggling and making my family suffer the way i see families suffer every day and have for the last 15 years.

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  8. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sally1981 View Post
    . Instead of a conversation about ending a life being carried out by innuendo, patients and their families could talk openly about it with their treaters.
    The thought of families being involved in the discussion gives me the heebie jeebies. Slippery slope and all...

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  10. #77
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    I will admit straight up that my view is likely to be biased. I'm a vet. A vet that deals with welfare of animals (investigations of cruelty) on a daily basis. In private practice I was the vet that the nurses booked the euthanasia appointments with.

    I see euthanasia as a gift. It is the last thing we can provide to show how much we love someone (or something). To allow euthanasia is allowing someone to end suffering. It allows their last days to be comfortable knowing that when everything is too much they can make a decision that now is the right time for them.

    I used to talk to people about when was the right time and aside from talking about quality of life we talked about the amount of happy moments vs the moments of pain or inability to act normally.

    My boss used to tell the story of his fathers death. His father was in hospital and was not going to recover. The dr would come in and ask if he was in pain. Every time he said yes or nodded a little the doctor would give him more morphine. Essentially he overdosed him but the patient was well aware of what was happening and chose to have more.

    It may also be because I am a vet and I have euthanased many animals but I am happy to say that provided what I was doing was legal I would euthanase a loved one.

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  12. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    The thought of families being involved in the discussion gives me the heebie jeebies. Slippery slope and all...
    I expect a lot of them would want their families there as support. I was thinking treaters, not panels and experts.

  13. #79
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    I have in my practice as an RN, "killed" a number of patients. I have withdrawn ventilator (breathing machine) support (under medical orders of course) multiple times when it became apparent that the patient was not going to make it. I do not consider myself a murderer. It is always tragic and heartbreaking, but do I ever doubt that I am doing the right thing? No. I see no benefit in extending suffering, when there is no hope of a better outcome. In fact, I advocated for my father's ventilator to be switched off, so he could pass quickly and not have the hideous, drawn out death that would have been his if he had been left to die of the cancer which had metastasised to almost every organ of his body. Whilst I acknowledge the difficulties in legislation, and the grey areas/cases that exist, the majority of deaths I personally see in ICU are truly inevitable and I struggle with the notion of actively prolonging suffering.

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  15. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silver flute View Post
    I have in my practice as an RN, "killed" a number of patients. I have withdrawn ventilator (breathing machine) support (under medical orders of course) multiple times when it became apparent that the patient was not going to make it. I do not consider myself a murderer. It is always tragic and heartbreaking, but do I ever doubt that I am doing the right thing? No. I see no benefit in extending suffering, when there is no hope of a better outcome. In fact, I advocated for my father's ventilator to be switched off, so he could pass quickly and not have the hideous, drawn out death that would have been his if he had been left to die of the cancer which had metastasised to almost every organ of his body. Whilst I acknowledge the difficulties in legislation, and the grey areas/cases that exist, the majority of deaths I personally see in ICU are truly inevitable and I struggle with the notion of actively prolonging suffering.
    First of all - what a difficult job you have. Thankyou for helping the community in the way you do.

    On the thread side of things I think there's a difference in removing life support and giving someone (who could theoretically last months or years) an injection.


 

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