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  1. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by shani2 View Post
    It does happen in those settings as a slow and painful process. I've seen it professionally and also personally. Recently a friend had a severe hypoxic brain injury. It took a few days to prove that she was 'brain dead'. It then took family another week to agree on turning off life support. She had a trachy by this point. She had recovered enough after this week that she had resumed spontaneous respiration and was on minimal medical support aside from anti epileptics. When they decided to withdrawal treatment but it took a week of withholding nutrition for her to die.

    I don't see this as euthanasia- just withdrawal of treatment, but it certainly wasn't quick.
    If you did that to an animal there would be 3-4 charges I could lay against you. Why are we allowed to do it to humans. If they won't live then why can't we give them something to stop the suffering of them, their families and their friends. And yes, I will sound callous but wouldn't the money we use on an icu bed for them be better off used on someone that might live?

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  3. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by shani2 View Post
    It does happen in those settings as a slow and painful process. I've seen it professionally and also personally. Recently a friend had a severe hypoxic brain injury. It took a few days to prove that she was 'brain dead'. It then took family another week to agree on turning off life support. She had a trachy by this point. She had recovered enough after this week that she had resumed spontaneous respiration and was on minimal medical support aside from anti epileptics. When they decided to withdrawal treatment but it took a week of withholding nutrition for her to die.

    I don't see this as euthanasia- just withdrawal of treatment, but it certainly wasn't quick.
    If she had been proven, by the usual required clinical tests, to be "clinically brain-dead", then she would not have suffered.

    It would have been awful for the nurses and family, however.


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  4. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by J37 View Post
    If she had been proven, by the usual required clinical tests, to be "clinically brain-dead", then she would not have suffered.

    It would have been awful for the nurses and family, however.


    Sent from my SM-N910G using The Bub Hub mobile app
    I agree, she herself would not have suffered, still not the way I would like to be remembered by my loved ones tho.

  5. #94
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    Yes 1000 times. I've palliated three family members at home who were terminal and all suffered pain and loss of dignity even though they were on enough medication to fell a horse. My own mother screamed and moaned through copious sedatives and massive doses or morphine nearly every half an hour until her body gave out. Had she been able to choose to speed up the process that was inevitable I have no doubt she would have chosen that over the death she got.

  6. #95
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    Its ridiculous isn't it. That we still havent legalised euthanasia. I've been working in a hospital acute ward for the last year where alot of patients go to die, especially as there is a lot of elderly in this town. where they are just 'kept comfortable'. Its really opened my eyes and left a mark on me to see that process happen. One man recently in particular, he just kept holding on, basically just starved to death slowly over nearly 2 weeks. Such a long slow process. I hate that look of death they all get, its like they just turn grey and sink into the bed and whither away. The poor families that have to witness that. Let them die with dignity and not let that be the last thing their family remembers

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  8. #96
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    I haven't read responses, but absolutely yes.
    The legal details could be tricky, but yes.

  9. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sally1981 View Post
    When we talk about 'withdrawal of medical treatment', what does that look like? I expect if it's a ventilator it would be over quickly, but what if the patient can breathe on their own and it's a feeding tube that you're withdrawing? That's just euthanasia by starving them to death isn't it?

    Personally, I think that's b.arbaric. The decision has already been made that treatment is futile and it's in the best interests of the patient to die. I think their lives should be able to be ended quickly and painlessly.
    Withdrawal of treatment can also involve refusal of chemo/ radiotherapy, no antibiotics for infections, no surgery etc. it is usually documented and usually (if possible) decided on by the patient and/or their families. It can be horrific, but sometimes just avoids drawing out the suffering.
    I agree, there should be a better way.

  10. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sally1981 View Post
    See that sounds quick and humane.

    I was thinking more of patients in a permanent persistent vegetative state whose only life sustaining treatment is a feeding tube (such as the Terry Shiavo and Tony Bland cases).

    Withdrawal of treatment for those patients can only be withdrawal of the feeding tube until they starve to death.

    I just think that's a good example of where 'active' euthanasia is the only reasonable option once the assessment has been made that they will never recover.
    How can someone in a permanent vegetative state properly consent to their own killing?

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  12. #99
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    Default Euthanasia - Yes or No?

    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    How can someone in a permanent vegetative state properly consent to their own killing?
    They can if they made their wishes clear to family prior. Same as organ donation, everyone in your immediate family should know your views and wants with things like this.

  13. #100
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    Default Euthanasia - Yes or No?

    Quote Originally Posted by A-Squared View Post
    They can if they made their wishes clear to family prior. Same as organ donation, everyone in your immediate family should know your views and wants with things like this.
    Good point but people change their minds all the time. How do we know that person isn't lying there regretting their previous decision and wanting to change their mind?


 

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