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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Ok so I'll revise my statement.

    Do you think the increase in hyperactive behaviour is bc kids these days have more obsessively healthy diets 5 and under so when they have additives their body can't handle it?
    No or at least not entirely. I think we can't discount what @Moxy said. I agree we are becoming intolerant as a society of children and what are really a lot of very normal behaviours.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by binnielici View Post
    No or at least not entirely. I think we can't discount what @Moxy said. I agree we are becoming intolerant as a society of children and what are really a lot of very normal behaviours.
    Oh completely agree. Both in regard to it being multi-faceted and how Moxy said how we have 'pathologised' normal childhood behaviour. Like sleep. The moment a child reaches a month old and is not sleeping it's this rush for sleep trainers, sleep school and controlled crying. For normal baby behaviour.

    My first son is quite rambunctious. He's neuro-typical, so nothing diagnosable, but he's a bit of a handful. His first few teachers were greenies, not long out of uni and childless. They seemed horrified and were even suggesting ASD (which is so far off the mark it's ridiculous). Bc a 5 year old boy struggling with impulse control must have something 'wrong' right?

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  5. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Oh completely agree. Both in regard to it being multi-faceted and how Moxy said how we have 'pathologised' normal childhood behaviour. Like sleep. The moment a child reaches a month old and is not sleeping it's this rush for sleep trainers, sleep school and controlled crying. For normal baby behaviour.

    My first son is quite rambunctious. He's neuro-typical, so nothing diagnosable, but he's a bit of a handful. His first few teachers were greenies, not long out of uni and childless. They seemed horrified and were even suggesting ASD (which is so far off the mark it's ridiculous). Bc a 5 year old boy struggling with impulse control must have something 'wrong' right?
    You hit the nail on the head there with that sleep analogy. Some babies don't sleep. The end. No great mystery that needs to be unraveled there.

    If your five year old (and mine for that matter) have a problem because they have poor impulse control, then I'm fecked because at 37* I still have major problems with impulse control, especially around chocolate and open bottles of wine.

    *note: I am not yet 37, I am still 6 weeks shy. But I went through most of 36 saying I was 37 because I forgot my own age, so I have decided now to just go with it and say I'm rounding up when in actual fact, I'm just losing my marbles. Probs a combination of lack of sleep and some weak brain cells thanks to the aforementioned bottles of wine.

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    I believe like pp it's not just sugar but an over load of chemicals ( additives , colours and preservatives , trans fats, soy, high fructose corn syrup , antibiotics in our food, GMO etc) and bad gut health that is effecting the kids - allergies and auto immune diseases are increasing rapidly and there has to be a reason

    I was born in the 70,s and yep we had fairy bread and chips at parties and the odd pink lemonade at the local Chinese restaurant once a year or maybe Pizza Hut ( eat in) a few times a year but we never had packet sauces or stocks or margarine or juice or processed meats or msg laden snacks and rice crackers or fast food , snacks were always fruit or wait for dinner! Our livestock and chickens back then were fed on mainly grass, not the genetically modified grain ( not their natural diet) that most get today and we used butter or as gross as it sounds fat - not man made oils to cook

    Even when people think they are being healthy if you add up the additives in a typical day and see how much is going into your child's body it can be quite frightening then after a year or two their poor bodies can react , I do worry about how this will effect them later in life , moderation in my opinion is a few times a year

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    Default *Spin off* Food allergies and sugar related behaviour

    Yes and no.

    DS has a normal diet. Same as what I had as a kid. Healthy, predominantly homemade, wholesome food.

    If we go to a cafe he can have a milkshake or juice. If we go to ikea, he can have a cinnamon bun. If we have dinner at MILs he can have ice cream for dessert.

    He eats amazingly, and he eats everything (he is currently eating a pickle wrapped in an avocado wrap!) and I've never noticed a reaction to certain foods with the exception of eating excessive amounts of sugary or additive filled food (like at a birthday party).

    My nephew is way more sensitive to additives and sugar but also has what I believe is an unhealthy attitude towards food. He will refuse to eat peanut butter because "it's unhealthy" even though he loves it. He's always been told he can't have peanut butter on his wraps for lunch because avocado is better. I think that's a bit sad. Peanut butter - especially the stuff I buy which is just peanuts, oil and salt - is no worse for you than anything else in moderation.

    I would 100% a kid that eats like DS than one who worries about what he is eating when he's only four.

    Anyway I digress.

    Personally I do avoid foods with additives and colouring and preservatives where possible, I make my own marinades and sauce bases, we eat less meat but what we eat is grass fed, I try to make snacks or buy things without numbers, and we generally eat fresh produce from the butcher or greengrocer, and I do understand clean eating but I don't necessarily think adopting a militant attitude towards it is the right approach.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DT75 View Post
    I don't think it's necessarily sugar.

    More a combination of additives and our current way of life- life is much busier now than when I was growing up, so there is less time for tolerance.
    There is also less time to take your kids aside and explain why their behaviour is not ok, and then bring them back- now we just take them home, which can be effective as a preventer but doesn't actually teach them to modify behaviour themselves.
    Having said this, DSS does not handle sugar well- whether from fruit or lollies, it disrupts his sleep.

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    I personally think it's because of preservatives rather than sugars

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    As a child of the 80's I remember my mum saying no froot loops, cocoa pops, green or red icy poles because she reckons they made us crazy!
    I think it's just that these horrid preservatives & sugar are so pervasive in packaged food these days, it's becoming more of a widespread issue.

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    A PP has already mentioned it but there has been research disproving that sugar causes hyperactive behaviour in children. Sorry no links but I'm sure it would be easy to find.

    I don't think any of the additive reactions are new. My 35 year old sister could not eat anything red when she was little. If anyone is old enough to remember the red and green cordial machine at the supermarket. We would always laugh when she was going silly and say she must have snuck a cup. There was no Natural Cofec Company back then, raspberry lollies, red frogs, strawberries and cream would all send her cray cray!

    Food issues were definitely a lot less diagnosed. A friend of mine was not diagnosed as celiac until after 40, people just didn't know about those thing when she was young (growing up in country WA) and she has a huge amount of health issues probably attributable to eating gluten all her life.

    MSG sends my daughter off the planet. She was first exposed to it in high amounts at 13m (trip to Vietnam). So no, I don't think the reactions happen because kids get no exposure to these things early on. In fact I often wonder if that trip caused her sensitivity. There was soooo much msg the food there even I reacted (poor sleep with restless legs) and I've never had an issue with it before or since.

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    They're two different things I think. Well an allergy could be anything from hives and being itch to anaphylaxis. But that's different to kids being on sugar highs / reacting badly to certain colours or 'numbers' in that 1 is an allergy, the other is more an intolerance.

    Only similarity being no one can explain the higher incidences of it today.

    There's a few theories around and some of those are currently being researched (with regard to allergies)

    1. Gut flora and over sterilisation. There is a link between not enough good bacteria and allergies and the fact we live in an over sterilised environment.

    2. Lack of vitamin D, since slip slip slap came in during the 80s allergy rates started to rise

    3. Limited diets of pregnant mothers. When our parents were pregnant with us in the early 80s there weren't any 'rules' about no ham, pre-made salads etc so mum's really ate anything, now we are taught to restrict our diets.

    4. Introduction of solids, when and what and also breastfeeding for longer.

    In my mind though I don't think when kids are starting solids or wiT they eat is a factor. This is anecdotal though.

    Eg my DD is allergic to peanuts, tree nuts and sesame. She was also allergic to wheat and eggs but had outgrown those. With her she basically had eczema since she was 1 week old. So that throws out the introduction of solids and what to introduce out as she was breastfed so what ever I ate came through my milk, so I don't accept the breastfeeding for longer reduces allergy BS that gets spouted about.

    Also I restricted my diet when pregnant with her, I ate what ever I liked with DS and he has no allergies, so I believe there's something in the theory that pregnant women's diets could be to blame.

    But then I saw in a Q and A show about allergies, when they spoke to a mum who had identical twin boys, both born vaginally and 1 had about 3 allergies, the other had none. So that could then throw out the whole pregnancy diet thing and lack of vitamin D theories too!

    Which leaves us with the gut flora theory....... And incidentally they have had some success with fecal transplants.... I'll leave ya all to google that one!


 

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