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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by CMF View Post
    Well, if at 2.5, she can tell the nutritional differences between fairy bread, and bread with chocolate spread, then surely at 5yo, she should know that chocolate makes her tummy feel bad and so she will say no?
    What's one got to do with the other? What a silly comparison ..

    Do you have that much restraint when it comes to eating food that you KNOW isn't good for you? So it's safe to assume then that you stay completely away from simple carbohydrates because they cause your blood sugar to spike and your pancreas and liver have to work overtime to get those levels back down again?

    Come on! You don't even have that restraint so do you really expect a 5 year old, whose brain still has immature self control, to be able to just say no to chocolate of all things?

    The mind boggles ..

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    Quote Originally Posted by FirstTimeMummy2012 View Post
    Not all allergies cause anaphylaxis. I'm not talking about an anaphylactic allergy. Allow me to rephrase. What if she had an intolerance to chocolate? What if my child were only 5 and the lure of chocolate far outweighed the effects of that intolerance in her little mind?
    At the end of the day IMO, it's irresponsible to be handing out chocolate to little kids as a teacher in a classroom setting as praise or a job well done! Id rather my daughter get a sticker or a stamp than a lump of sugar.
    You may not think so. But I do.
    I think it's the parent's responsibility to inform the teacher if they don't want their child eating certain things rather than expecting the teacher to clear every food related lesson with 20+ parents.
    My dd is in childcare and if I felt strongly about her not eating certain things then I'd have let Childcare know when I enrolled her.

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  4. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by just her chameleon View Post
    I really hope so. It is truly hell seeing him react to things. He completely loses control, and you can see in his eyes he's terrified because he has no idea why he's feeling like that.
    I hope so too

    I'm well accustomed to what a meltdown involves. It ain't pretty

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  6. #64
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    Follow-up...after her soft-serve ice-cream for morning tea, my 2 year-old had cherry tomatoes, strawberries, apple, ham, cheese and Savoy crackers for lunch. And a few Tiny Teddies. I call that fairly balanced. But I'm sure I will be told otherwise

    She wanted a spinach and kale frittata, but again, I put my foot down and sent her to bed with a bottle of full-fat cows' milk.



    Sent from my SM-N910G using The Bub Hub mobile app

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    Quote Originally Posted by BettyV View Post
    I think it's the parent's responsibility to inform the teacher if they don't want their child eating certain things rather than expecting the teacher to clear every food related lesson with 20+ parents.
    My dd is in childcare and if I felt strongly about her not eating certain things then I'd have let Childcare know when I enrolled her.
    I agree and you're absolutely right! I don't want my daughter eating certain things at cc either so they have been informed. They provide her lunch so it makes sense that I need to say something.
    But at school, I would be providing her lunch so I know what she's eating. It would never have occurred to me that a teacher hands out chocolate to her class hence why it wouldn't have occurred to me to speak to the school about it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by J37 View Post
    Follow-up...after her soft-serve ice-cream for morning tea, my 2 year-old had cherry tomatoes, strawberries, apple, ham, cheese and Savoy crackers for lunch. And a few Tiny Teddies. I call that fairly balanced. But I'm sure I will be told otherwise

    She wanted a spinach and kale frittata, but again, I put my foot down and sent her to bed with a bottle of full-fat cows' milk.
    You monster!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mod-Degrassi View Post
    I also think inactivity in children plays a huge role in obesity. Back when I was young, children played outside for hours on end, running around and riding bikes. Many of these youngsters now spend their spare time in front of screens (computers/tablets/gaming/TV). They are not burning off the calories they consume.
    You'll be happy to know my 3 and 4yos spent the most of today chasing our goat around.
    Seriously though, I do wonder about the lack of activity. My parents are fitness fanatics themselves but they were also terribly paranoid about bad guys. I wasn't really even allowed in our own backyard without supervision (and they were always busy) so I spent most of my time indoor playing with toys and I was pretty chubby by the time I hit my teens. They don't eat great either though. Everything was pre made in a box from the freezer. I'm overweight now, I won't deny it. My kids have a lot better eating habits than I did as a child. I cook most things from scratch. Sometimes I use bottle sauces if I am running low on time. But they have white bread and I bake cakes with sugar in them sometimes. They spend almost all day, every day playing outside. Either chasing the aforementioned goat and the ducks or riding bikes or just climbing on who knows what. I am stuck arguing with them nearly every night to come inside and go to bed because straight after dinner they take off back outside.

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    Wow.
    ... couldn't quote everyone...

    I would never ever give food to a child who had allergies or intolerances. Most of my teaching in this situation was with older children who would often refuse if they knew they weren't allowed. I wouldn't send a permission slip home.
    That said. .in my early days of teaching we used to give lollies and stuff as rewards. All. The. Time.
    I don't do this anymore. But still.
    In early years or daycare teachers are well aware of allergies or intolerances and wouldn't give children/toddlers anything they shouldn't have or that their parents have objected to.

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  15. #69
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    TimeForWine is offline Taking everyday one wine at a time...
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    Honestly - its fairy bread, not crack cocaine.

    Would it worry me if it was a special occasion - nope.

    My kids are awesome eaters and LOVE all the nutritious good stuff - they have a great healthy relationship with food - they know what is good for them. They know that treats are just that and not to be eaten all the time. They also know that its not 'bad' to eat treats.

    I refuse to obsess over food and I refuse to teach my children to obsess over food.

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    TimeForWine is offline Taking everyday one wine at a time...
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    Is there no end to your madness???


    Quote Originally Posted by J37 View Post
    Follow-up...after her soft-serve ice-cream for morning tea, my 2 year-old had cherry tomatoes, strawberries, apple, ham, cheese and Savoy crackers for lunch. And a few Tiny Teddies. I call that fairly balanced. But I'm sure I will be told otherwise

    She wanted a spinach and kale frittata, but again, I put my foot down and sent her to bed with a bottle of full-fat cows' milk.



    Sent from my SM-N910G using The Bub Hub mobile app


 
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