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  1. #31
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    Personally I have no dramas if my childcare centre (or family daycare) gave my kids fairy bread every now and then. As long as its not an every day thing, meh. I see it no different to them having an iceblock of an afternoon on hot days, or making pikelets and enjoying them for morning/afternoon tea. Yes it sends some of my kids on a ridiculous sugar high but its one day here and there. The only time I would had an issue is if there were allergies/intolerances. My kids eat a pretty good diet and love their fruit and vege and are very active so some crap food doesn't bother me. I just send them outside to run off the sugar high.

    ETA- if a parent has a strong objection to their child having these foods then I do believe the centre/carer needs to respect that.

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  3. #32
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    So...bad parenting, I suppose

    She gets an ice-cream when we do the grocery shopping. She begs me for a quinoa and lentil salad...but I put my foot down.

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  5. #33
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    ...actually, so far she's broken the spoon, got ice-cream all over her top, and eaten less than 1/4.

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  7. #34
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    Default Fairy bread for afternoon tea at 2y olds childcare? ??

    Quote Originally Posted by J37 View Post
    I don't think it's "crazy". Poor kids these days are expected to eat quinoa, lentils and green smoothies!

    My child-care (where my 2yo attends), serves fruit for morning tea, generally a hot lunch dish such as rice/pasta with vegies, and something sweet for afternoon tea. This has been fairy bread some weeks. Sounds like a fair enough menu to me.

    Life has become very strange when as parents we get upset about fairy bread. I think we need to collectively calm down a bit.

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    I just can't see how serving fairy bread is sending the right message about nutrition. White bread = no nutritional value. Margarine = rubbish. 100's and 1000's = sugar and additives. Yeah, I think I'll pass on that for my 2.5 year old. I'd rather she learn about what's good for her and what's not right now! Oh and she's certainly not eating quinoa or lentils 😂

    Call me "crazy" but I'd rather my daughter have a slice of whole meal bread with a homemade chocolate spread packed full of real almonds, hazelnuts and cacao then some fake margarine with sugar balls all over it! Yuk!
    Last edited by FirstTimeMummy2012; 04-02-2016 at 10:51.

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  9. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by FirstTimeMummy2012 View Post
    I just can't see how serving fairy bread is sending the right message about nutrition. White bread = no nutritional value. Margarine = rubbish. 100's and 1000's = sugar and additives. Yeah, I think I'll pass on that for my 2.5 year old. I'd rather she learn about what's good for her and what's not right now! Oh and she's certainly not eating quinoa or lentils

    Call me "crazy" but I'd rather my daughter have a slice of whole meal bread with a homemade chocolate spread packed full of real almonds, cacao and not loaded with refined sugar and palm oil!
    At 2.5yo, do you really think that she can tell the difference between 'bread with sweet stuff on top', and 'bread with sweet stuff on top'? I mean I get what you're saying, but I really don't think that that 'message' would be getting through. Maybe a plate of fruit/vegies would be a better 'message'.

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  11. #36
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    Thanks for the replies everyone. I am pretty passionate on this as spend many days teaching parents about nutrition for the their under 5's - so bare with me LOL. I have no issues with occasional fairy bread , my kids have special treats and ice-cream once a week. I have an issue with it being a part of the menu which I am still to find out if it is or not.
    In todays society which finds Australia as one of the most overweight nations in the world, it is these early years that set up life-long dietary habits. We were very strict with our 7yDD ( not like crazy health food strict more if you are hungry have an apple strict, thirsty you can have water) give her chocolate bar now and she will only eat half of it, my kids have never had a soft drink ever - the one time they accidently did the both spat it out. My son we were not as strict and he'll polish of chocolate bar and want to eat his sisters. however, my kids hopefully will not make up the 2/3 adults in our country who are overweight or obese and all the co-morbidities that go with that. My niece on the other hand is a 9 year old who has had to wear size 14-16 clothes from the age of 8 - most likely will. It is just not good practice to sprinkle coloured sugar onto white flour and more sugar with some yeast in it and feed it to two year olds which is why it is in general considered a 'party food'. Afternoon tea at childcare is not a party. It's afternoon tea. ( sorry for the rant!). Anyway - they are going to send me a copy of the menu today so I'll see from that before I approach them.

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  13. #37
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    Gosh. I grew up on white bread. And the odd occasion of sprinkles on it. I turned out okay.
    In fact. .oh the horror... I give my daughter white bread regularly. I also feed her food from packets and boy does she love a cinnamon doughnut.
    But I also offer her fruit and veggies. .and yogurts and eggs etc.
    She also drinks a high calorie supplement to help her grow.

    Everything in moderation.
    Isn't that the key? I've not met any adult who. ..even the healthiest eating ones. ...who don't cheat every now and then on yummy desserts or savoury food.
    I don't know why food is such a crazy big deal. Everyone knows that the odd little treat is good. No one is saying that eating McDonald's or fairy bread for every meal is healthy. But once in a blue moon doesn't cause long term harm.

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  15. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by CMF View Post
    At 2.5yo, do you really think that she can tell the difference between 'bread with sweet stuff on top', and 'bread with sweet stuff on top'? I mean I get what you're saying, but I really don't think that that 'message' would be getting through. Maybe a plate of fruit/vegies would be a better 'message'.
    Yeah she actually can. She understands what is made purely from sugar and what is made from almonds and hazelnuts. My chocolate spread isn't really sweet anyway. If you give her white bread, she won't eat it, yet she'll eat a slice of whole grain bread. I teach her that you can still have yummy homemade sweets without loading up on a heap of sugar. She asks for broccoli and cucumber with her evening meals so I think it's safe to say that I've sent the right message.

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  17. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by CleverClogs View Post
    Thanks for the replies everyone. I am pretty passionate on this as spend many days teaching parents about nutrition for the their under 5's - so bare with me LOL. I have no issues with occasional fairy bread , my kids have special treats and ice-cream once a week. I have an issue with it being a part of the menu which I am still to find out if it is or not.
    In todays society which finds Australia as one of the most overweight nations in the world, it is these early years that set up life-long dietary habits. We were very strict with our 7yDD ( not like crazy health food strict more if you are hungry have an apple strict, thirsty you can have water) give her chocolate bar now and she will only eat half of it, my kids have never had a soft drink ever - the one time they accidently did the both spat it out. My son we were not as strict and he'll polish of chocolate bar and want to eat his sisters. however, my kids hopefully will not make up the 2/3 adults in our country who are overweight or obese and all the co-morbidities that go with that. My niece on the other hand is a 9 year old who has had to wear size 14-16 clothes from the age of 8 - most likely will. It is just not good practice to sprinkle coloured sugar onto white flour and more sugar with some yeast in it and feed it to two year olds which is why it is in general considered a 'party food'. Afternoon tea at childcare is not a party. It's afternoon tea. ( sorry for the rant!). Anyway - they are going to send me a copy of the menu today so I'll see from that before I approach them.
    I hear you OP!! I'm very passionate about nutrition and diet also and it pains me when I hear people say "oh but my child only eats that once in a blue moon" when really it's 2-3 times a week!
    My child gets treats but they are few and far between and those treats are a healthier alternative than something laden with sugar. I just finished nutrition and the effects of what sugar does to an adult, let alone a toddler, and it's disturbing and frightening! Blood sugars spike, the pancreas has to work hard to release insulin, the liver has to store the excess glucose in the blood****** where finally blood sugar levels normalise. A long unnecessary process ☹

  18. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamtam View Post
    I don't know why food is such a crazy big deal.
    Because we are one of the fattest nations on earth. 1/3 children are overweight or obese and 2/3 adults. That's why.

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