+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 53
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    23,042
    Thanks
    6,287
    Thanked
    17,288
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Bubhub Blogger - Thanks100 Posts in a week
    Having 2 kids in primary now there is more to it than counting to 10, knowing alphabet. I know no one here is saying that, but I find most people see the requirements in a one dimensional, myopic way.

    What I find equally, if not more important is behavioural, neurological and social aspects.

    Can they sit on the floor for half an hour without fidgeting, calling out?
    Do they have good impulse control?
    Can they continue to hold their attention to a task without supervision?
    Can they continue to hold their attention to a task while it's noisy/hot/crowded?
    Can they follow tasks with 2/3/4/5 sets of stages or instructions?

    Do they share in their play?
    Can they actively pull back from play fighting? (let me tell you mothers of boys - you are going to encounter this).
    Do they feel comfortable approaching teachers if they have wet themselves/are being picked on/don't have any lunch?
    Can they verbalise their feelings on a basic level?
    Can they verbalise why they did something on a basic level?
    Do they understand the bare basics of personal safety and space? What is a good and bad touch, what should they do?

    Those are just a few that come to mind....

  2. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to delirium For This Useful Post:

    A-Squared  (28-01-2016),babyno1onboard  (28-01-2016),BigRedV  (28-01-2016),GrabbyCrabby  (30-01-2016),LoveLivesHere  (28-01-2016),Nafsika  (28-01-2016),Rose&Aurelia&Hannah  (28-01-2016),smallpotatoes  (29-01-2016)

  3. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    23,042
    Thanks
    6,287
    Thanked
    17,288
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Bubhub Blogger - Thanks100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by A-Squared View Post
    My DD is definitely intelligent enough to start this year (can count to 100 knows the alphabet, knows all her colours and can differentiate between light and dark colours, knows so many shapes including hexagons, pentagons and octagons, can spell her name and recognise it when it's written), but it's more the not holding a pen properly or drawing anything more than lines and scribbles and inability to focus on something and trying something she doesn't know how to do. Whenever you encourage her to she cries and gets frustrated before even trying.
    See in my experience as a mum and pre service teacher, that stuff is easily taught and picked up on. Teaching them to write their name or correctly hold their pen won't really deeply affect their first year. The points I listed above are far more important.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to delirium For This Useful Post:

    A-Squared  (28-01-2016)

  5. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    my house
    Posts
    17,982
    Thanks
    1,414
    Thanked
    7,613
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Wipe own bum
    Open lunch box
    Express needs
    Make friends
    Sit for 10 mins and listen
    Concentrate on an activity for 10 minutes
    Knows address and phone number

    Helpful but not essential
    * write own name

    Any academic stuff is completely not necessary.

    If you check the continuum in literacy and numeracy, it says that by the end of the first year of school, children are expected to

    Count to 20, recognise numbers up to 30
    Read level 5-8

    Google literacy and numeracy continuum to see what else is expected by the end of first year of school.

  6. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to BigRedV For This Useful Post:

    GrabbyCrabby  (30-01-2016),Louise41  (31-01-2016),smallpotatoes  (29-01-2016),Stretched  (29-01-2016)

  7. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    my house
    Posts
    17,982
    Thanks
    1,414
    Thanked
    7,613
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts

    Default Spin off: Starting Primary School

    Quote Originally Posted by A-Squared View Post
    My DD is definitely intelligent enough to start this year (can count to 100 knows the alphabet, knows all her colours and can differentiate between light and dark colours, knows so many shapes including hexagons, pentagons and octagons, can spell her name and recognise it when it's written), but it's more the not holding a pen properly or drawing anything more than lines and scribbles and inability to focus on something and trying something she doesn't know how to do. Whenever you encourage her to she cries and gets frustrated before even trying.
    All of that is not important imo.

    What I would be focussing on is her being confident enough to have s go at things that challenge her as she will be challenged every day at school, especially in first year of school when they're adjusting to only 1 teacher and lots of other kids
    Last edited by BigRedV; 28-01-2016 at 21:11.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to BigRedV For This Useful Post:

    HollyGolightly81  (28-01-2016)

  9. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,921
    Thanks
    638
    Thanked
    2,344
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    This is very entertaining to read. My little boy starts Prep tomorrow. My husband (who is ex-Army) has been trying to "drill into" him rules of starting school.

    Thus far they are...
    1. Put your hand up when you want to speak.
    2. No "camping wees" (ie. pulling your doodle out and weeing on a tree).
    3. Look after your belongings.
    4. Wipe your own bum.

    So he has had poor Oscar reciting these back to him for the last few days!! I just sit back, amused.

    Sent from my SM-N910G using The Bub Hub mobile app

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to J37 For This Useful Post:

    Rose&Aurelia&Hannah  (28-01-2016)

  11. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    4,790
    Thanks
    4,285
    Thanked
    4,130
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Having 2 kids in primary now there is more to it than counting to 10, knowing alphabet. I know no one here is saying that, but I find most people see the requirements in a one dimensional, myopic way.

    What I find equally, if not more important is behavioural, neurological and social aspects.

    Can they sit on the floor for half an hour without fidgeting, calling out?
    Do they have good impulse control?
    Can they continue to hold their attention to a task without supervision?
    Can they continue to hold their attention to a task while it's noisy/hot/crowded?
    Can they follow tasks with 2/3/4/5 sets of stages or instructions?

    Do they share in their play?
    Can they actively pull back from play fighting? (let me tell you mothers of boys - you are going to encounter this).
    Do they feel comfortable approaching teachers if they have wet themselves/are being picked on/don't have any lunch?
    Can they verbalise their feelings on a basic level?
    Can they verbalise why they did something on a basic level?
    Do they understand the bare basics of personal safety and space? What is a good and bad touch, what should they do?

    Those are just a few that come to mind....
    This is a fab list!

    And let me tell you, DS is only a week off two and I'm already encountering the play fighting and not knowing when to lay off! Right now it's quite sweet except for the fact that the children he usually picks have no idea what he's doing and get upset and I end up pulling this crazy, giggling, puppy-like child off! 😂

  12. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    5,593
    Thanks
    1,638
    Thanked
    2,401
    Reviews
    6
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    DD will start school next year so I still have 12 months to worry about all this - I'm already nervous!!

    The academic stuff I'm not worried about, but I do worry about her emotional readiness and self-care abilities. Toilet training has been a nightmare with her, she still wets herself at least once or twice a week and can't wipe her own bum effectively. She has recently started crying when dropping her off at daycare (she's been happily going to the same place for 4yrs!!) and is quite shy in group situations. I'm so worried that school will be a terrifying experience for her.

  13. #18
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    8,351
    Thanks
    5,878
    Thanked
    4,888
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 17/4/15100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by Cue View Post
    DD will start school next year so I still have 12 months to worry about all this - I'm already nervous!!

    The academic stuff I'm not worried about, but I do worry about her emotional readiness and self-care abilities. Toilet training has been a nightmare with her, she still wets herself at least once or twice a week and can't wipe her own bum effectively. She has recently started crying when dropping her off at daycare (she's been happily going to the same place for 4yrs!!) and is quite shy in group situations. I'm so worried that school will be a terrifying experience for her.
    When was she born? Sounds like my DD. I don't think she will be terrified but she doesn't cope well with the boisterous boys who are older and bigger, but she's getting used to them at child care. She's been to 2 different centres now and she's encountered the same types of boys at both and probably will at kindy too, so she may figure out they're really just boys being buys and they don't purposely upset her.

  14. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    At the beach
    Posts
    10,495
    Thanks
    1,430
    Thanked
    9,005
    Reviews
    3
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 17/10/14100 Posts in a week

    Default Spin off: Starting Primary School

    I personally think intelligence has very little to do with school readiness.

    I am not wedded enough to the WA model to not be prepared to admit that there were many kids in my daughters kindy and preprimary class who were "smart" but completely unsuited to being in a classroom environment.

    My daughter struggled greatly and she's one of the "smartest" (accordingly to academic testing) girls for her age in the state. Only when we moved her to a school with smaller classes, more teachers in the classroom and no risk of her ever being in a split class did she reach her potential.

  15. #20
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    8,351
    Thanks
    5,878
    Thanked
    4,888
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 17/4/15100 Posts in a week
    The primary school we are zoned to says this.....Children are not required to attend school until they are six years old, but may be enrolled at a government primary school from the age of five. Schools may accept children immediately following their fifth birthday but it is not compulsory for them to do so. However as a minimum, schools shall enrol children aged five at the beginning of each school term.

    Seems to contradict the SA policy of May cut off.

    I'm confused now!


 

Similar Threads

  1. Seaford Primary School Vic
    By 3cats1pug in forum Preschools and Schools
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-07-2015, 20:41
  2. Shire Primary School help please! :)
    By Shaydee in forum Sutherland Shire
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 06-05-2015, 11:45
  3. Age to start Primary School (NSW)
    By The Vogue Mumma in forum Preschools and Schools
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 27-03-2015, 14:48

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
sales & new stuffsee all
Carmel's Beauty Secrets
Oil Layering for Firming and Toning Carmel's Beauty Secrets
Did you know that spreading an oil such as Almond Oil or Coconut Oil over your skin after bath or shower helps to alleviate cellulite and also tone and firm the skin?
This Beauty Guide will show you how!
featured supporter
KindyROO
KindyROO offers activities for babies & toddlers in a fun learning centre, focussing on developmental education. Classes are available at three Brisbane and two Gold Coast locations. Enrol today & help your child to reach their full potential. Visit the website to find out more.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!