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  1. #301
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    It was always calendar year in WA until maybe 15 years ago?
    I was February and so one of the oldest in my class but still 17 in year 12.
    We've a DD who is Sept, a DS who is Feb and my last prem boy who is October.
    It's easier having older ones IMO

  2. #302
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    When I went to school it was calendar year too. One of my good friends from school was born 6th Jan 84 and I was born 6th Nov 84 and we graduated together. I feel like a simple calendar year approach over all states would be so much easier/cut and dry. I have no idea why it changed.

  3. #303
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    Quote Originally Posted by MickeyMouse84 View Post
    When I went to school it was calendar year too. One of my good friends from school was born 6th Jan 84 and I was born 6th Nov 84 and we graduated together. I feel like a simple calendar year approach over all states would be so much easier/cut and dry. I have no idea why it changed.
    I agree. I would prefer a calendar year cutoff too.
    Just curious though what was the age cutoff did you have to turn 5 or 6?

  4. #304
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    Default Parents with kids starting school at less than 5yo

    Quote Originally Posted by Sonja View Post
    There are schools like that in Australia but usually private or schools which are not considered main******. My son's school is an International Baccalaureate school so they run on a different model of learning. No desks in classrooms in junior and the learning model is quite different too.

    Some of the state schools in Melbourne we looked at sending the girls before we moved to WA also had no reading or writing before year 2. It can be hard making the choice to send your child to a school like that when they aren't the norm here.
    I know, schools like this are very few and far between in Australia, I found it was even a bit tough to find Montessori preschools.

    But, if one of the best education systems in the world believes children should start school later because the belief is that play and child-led learning is so important in the early childhood years then maybe that is something that main****** schools, and also parents making the choice of when to consider sending their child, should be taking into account.

    Ever since uni I've felt child led learning and play is so much more important for young children than this shift in focus to pushing kids more and more when they are not ready. I just genuinely don't believe 4 year olds should be starting full time school. Preschool, most definitely, but not proper school.

    I also find it interesting that in an attempt to improve their standings on the world stage, both America and Australia have moved to these more full on, intense modes of learning (less recess, less play in prep/kindergarten), national curriculum, etc and it isn't helping but maybe if they rewound a bit to how it used to be and paid a bit more attention to Scandinavian type models of education they might see different results.
    Last edited by HollyGolightly81; 29-01-2016 at 05:07.

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  6. #305
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    Genuine question. What was used as an indicator of being the best education system in the world eg. Was it literacy levels, numeracy, something else?

    I just wonder because from personal experience and those around me the shift from secondary to tertiary studies was a huge shock. The pace was so much faster, very much in dependant learning and you had to really drive yourself.
    If the scandinavian model helps prepare kids for life after school that would be what I consider a really good education system.

  7. #306
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    Default Parents with kids starting school at less than 5yo

    Quote Originally Posted by HollyGolightly81 View Post
    I know, schools like this are very few and far between in Australia, I found it was even a bit tough to find Montessori preschools.

    But, if one of the best education systems in the world believes children should start school later because the belief is that play and child-led learning is so important in the early childhood years then maybe that is something that main****** schools, and also parents making the choice of when to consider sending their child, should be taking into account.

    Ever since uni I've felt child led learning and play is so much more important for young children than this shift in focus to pushing kids more and more when they are not ready. I just genuinely don't believe 4 year olds should be starting full time school. Preschool, most definitely, but not proper school.

    I also find it interesting that in an attempt to improve their standings on the world stage, both America and Australia have moved to these more full on, intense modes of learning (less recess, less play in prep/kindergarten), national curriculum, etc and it isn't helping but maybe if they rewound a bit to how it used to be and paid a bit more attention to Scandinavian type models of education they might see different results.
    There is currently a big push in selected NSW public primary schools for a move to change their approach to teaching and learning and learning environments. It started in 2012.

    At the school I work at, we don't have allocated desks for children, the classrooms have work stations and whilst the teacher is working with a small group of children, the rest of the class choose from different activities. They have to do a certain amount of activities each session. Our year 5 and 6 classrooms have no desks at all and neither does our library.

    Whilst this is a more child led approach, I have to say it doesn't work for every child, especially at our school where some children need structure and their own "spot" but since 2012 our school has been one of the standouts in student achievement out if all the selected schools.

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    Default Parents with kids starting school at less than 5yo

    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    There is currently a big push in selected NSW public primary schools for a move to change their approach to teaching and learning and learning environments. It started in 2012.

    At the school I work at, we don't have allocated desks for children, the classrooms have work stations and whilst the teacher is working with a small group of children, the rest of the class choose from different activities. They have to do a certain amount of activities each session. Our year 5 and 6 classrooms have no desks at all and neither does our library.

    Whilst this is a more child led approach, I have to say it doesn't work for every child, especially at our school where some children need structure and their own "spot" but since 2012 our school has been one of the standouts in student achievement out if all the selected schools.
    Interesting. When I mentioned child-led learning I was thinking more of younger children (i.e. Before school age) so interesting to learn more about it with older kids. And great to hear some schools are starting to make a shift as well.

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    Default Parents with kids starting school at less than 5yo

    Quote Originally Posted by Jontu View Post
    Genuine question. What was used as an indicator of being the best education system in the world eg. Was it literacy levels, numeracy, something else?

    I just wonder because from personal experience and those around me the shift from secondary to tertiary studies was a huge shock. The pace was so much faster, very much in dependant learning and you had to really drive yourself.
    If the scandinavian model helps prepare kids for life after school that would be what I consider a really good education system.
    From what I can tell it's determined by a world wide standardized test given to 15 year olds and Finland regularly scores well in reading, math and science. But Scandinavia in general is regularly praised for their overall attitude on raising and educating their children.

  11. #309
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    Quote Originally Posted by HollyGolightly81 View Post
    From what I can tell it's determined by a world wide standardized test given to 15 year olds and Finland regularly scores well in reading, math and science. But Scandinavia in general is regularly praised for their overall attitude on raising and educating their children.
    It's ironic given these countries dislike standardised testing themselves. They prefer ongoing class assessment.

  12. #310
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    It's ironic given these countries dislike standardised testing themselves. They prefer ongoing class assessment.
    Yeah, I think I read that that is the only standardized test Finnish kids have.


 

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