+ Reply to Thread
Page 22 of 32 FirstFirst ... 122021222324 ... LastLast
Results 211 to 220 of 317
  1. #211
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    my house
    Posts
    17,699
    Thanks
    1,391
    Thanked
    7,288
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    For 2 kids... For 1/3 of the year when CCR runs out I will be paying $2,000 per fortnight (out of pocket). This won't be the determining factor in sending my children to school however if I think my kids are ready for school then hell yeah I will be happy about saving $$$
    I recall you saying in another thread a while ago you'll likely be putting your child in a private school. You know there's no rebates for school, right?

    Personally I think an education is priceless and if that means we pay an extra year of daycare fees then so be it.

    I just worked out that for my son, I paid $11250 in daycare fees last year for 3 days a week. This doesn't include rebate, so roughly $5500 and for my daughter who could've started school the year before she did I paid $3200 in preschool fees and $8300 in daycare fees.

  2. #212
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    2,377
    Thanks
    1,504
    Thanked
    883
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    Honestly, 6 months is huge in all aspects of development in 4 year olds. Do you really not see that?

    Unless a child is an absolute genius, nobody gets moved up grades???? I've never heard of this, the last one I read about was an exceptional child in primary doing high school subjects.

    I'd rather my child be playing up because they're bored in daycare than playing up because they're struggling at school.

    Again, you seem to be only talking about the learning. Nobody is saying that your son can't or won't learn.m this year. The point is there is a much bigger picture here than him just coping in the first year of school that some people seem to be missing.
    That's the thing. My dd was 6m older than ds when she started school. Development wise as in how he interacts with other kids he is way ahead of where she was at so it's not just the age.
    Even now they are nearly 2 y difference. He has less tantrums, he is far more easy going, he can go to an unfamiliar environment and with kids he doesn't know and fits in way better than she does.
    In terms of when he is 18 and driving etc. why would a high school child need to drive anyway?

  3. #213
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    At the beach
    Posts
    10,495
    Thanks
    1,430
    Thanked
    9,003
    Reviews
    3
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 17/10/14100 Posts in a week
    I had my drivers licence for the 2nd half of year 12. It was awesome. I drove to every party and never ever drank as a result. I wasn't allowed to drive with any other person in the car for 4 months but after that I did.

    I drove to and from school every day. I loved having my licence.

  4. #214
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    2,670
    Thanks
    1,005
    Thanked
    2,414
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Sonja View Post
    All good.

    School has been a very complicated journey for my 2nd born for so many reasons. I hadn't ever factored in the age as it's the norm here. I actually have the reverse problem that she's a candidate for acceleration which I've refused to consider because of her age.
    I think that what is the 'norm' for the area should be factored in to the equation (as well as individual child readiness), because you're then putting your child in with peers of a similar age. I think the social problems come when they're months younger than all of their peers.

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Full House For This Useful Post:

    ArthurDent  (28-01-2016),Sonja  (28-01-2016)

  6. #215
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    2,670
    Thanks
    1,005
    Thanked
    2,414
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by A-Squared View Post
    I've heard the same from a friend who kept their child back after telling them about starting kindy the next year for the previous 6 months then they had to tell their son that no sorry you aren't going to school anymore. He felt the same anxiety and couldn't understand why his friends from his mums group that were the same age were going to kindy and why he wasn't.

    So whether your child repeats a year or is held back, the child could still experience some anxiety.
    Absolutely. I have a friend who's son is 6 in Feb, and he expected to go to school last year, but it was recommended by pre-school that he did another year...so, in the end, they moved his pre-school so he wouldn't feel like he was 'stuck' waiting. He was disappointed he wasn't going to school with his peers, but forgot about ti and moved on from it a lot faster than my friend's son did. I was just sharing my friend's son experience, which had a deep effect on him, and continued on for a few years.

  7. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Full House For This Useful Post:

    A-Squared  (28-01-2016),Rose&Aurelia&Hannah  (28-01-2016)

  8. #216
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    2,670
    Thanks
    1,005
    Thanked
    2,414
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Jontu View Post
    I don't under stand what was their reason for repeating the child then if he was going fine academically and it wasn't his maturity either? Maybe it was repeating him that was the problem.
    His maturity was fine for his age - but it meant he was 6-12 months behind in his maturity compared to the majority of his peers that saw him being repeated. And yes, repeating was the problem...but maturity wise the teachers said there was a high risk of him having to repeat in a higher grade, and recommended repeating kindy as it's usually less traumatic for the child. In his case, it caused a lot of problems, but there were going to be problems either way. Had he started school at 5.5years he would have avoided the issues with maturity, and then the following issues surrounding repeating.

  9. #217
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    7,847
    Thanks
    5,061
    Thanked
    4,446
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 17/4/15100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by Full House View Post
    His maturity was fine for his age - but it meant he was 6-12 months behind in his maturity compared to the majority of his peers that saw him being repeated. And yes, repeating was the problem...but maturity wise the teachers said there was a high risk of him having to repeat in a higher grade, and recommended repeating kindy as it's usually less traumatic for the child. In his case, it caused a lot of problems, but there were going to be problems either way. Had he started school at 5.5years he would have avoided the issues with maturity, and then the following issues surrounding repeating.
    This to me says the problem is more so that the kids who are held back are causing the issue with those who are not. As I've said in a PP 8if every child were to start when they were supposed to and no one was held off there would only be a 12 month age gap at most.

    Not enough has been said about the impacts of too many parents holding their kids back on the other kids who still start on time (according to the State's rules)

    My DD as I've mentioned will e at the younger end of the scale and I'm not sure her pen holding and drawing / writing skills will be there, but there's no way in hell I'm holding her off until 2018 to start school just because she might be in a class with other kids who were purposely held back and are quite a bit older.

  10. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to A-Squared For This Useful Post:

    Amber4304  (28-01-2016),Green Cheese  (28-01-2016),Jontu  (28-01-2016),TeaAndToast  (28-01-2016)

  11. #218
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    12,708
    Thanks
    9,558
    Thanked
    12,691
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 9/1/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 7/11/14Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 3/10/14100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    I recall you saying in another thread a while ago you'll likely be putting your child in a private school. You know there's no rebates for school, right?

    Personally I think an education is priceless and if that means we pay an extra year of daycare fees then so be it.
    .
    Of course. There is CCR for before and after school though.

    DS2 won't be going to a flash private school. School fees + before and after school is still a heck of a lot cheaper than daycare for us.

    I don't know any parent who would yank their kid from daycare and put them into school JUST to save money.

  12. #219
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    2,670
    Thanks
    1,005
    Thanked
    2,414
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by A-Squared View Post

    Not enough has been said about the impacts of too many parents holding their kids back on the other kids who still start on time (according to the State's rules)

    .
    I'm in NSW, so no one is 'holding their kid back.' The rule is that they must be enrolled in school the year they turn 6. It's just that the cut off is that the child must turn 5 by a certain date (which varies anywhere from end of March to end of July)...I haven't looked in to this at all, but my guess is that parents started sending their kids at 4.5 instead of 5.5 because my research has been done on the subject since the 80's (when I started school and kids just started the year they made the cut off without any real thought process involved) and before that, and it has been realised that, generally speaking, children do better starting school the year turn 6, and not 5.
    What you do with your child is completely up to you...from memory you said your daughter is a Feb baby, and that's a big grey area IMO. I would 110% support an end of March cut off period for school...as it helps reduce the possible 18 month age gap between school kids, so that all kids start on time (IMO starting at 4.5 is early, starting at 5.5 is on time, not late).

  13. #220
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    2,377
    Thanks
    1,504
    Thanked
    883
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Sonja View Post
    I had my drivers licence for the 2nd half of year 12. It was awesome. I drove to every party and never ever drank as a result. I wasn't allowed to drive with any other person in the car for 4 months but after that I did.

    I drove to and from school every day. I loved having my licence.
    Fair enough. Most likely I wouldn't want my kids driving to and from school but I guess it would depend on what public transport was like or.if the school was in walking distance.
    Maybe my childhood was very different to others. I just didn't go to 18y parties during highschool, didn't get my licence until I was 19 or maybe 20, was not interested in sports, no interest in drinking. School just wasn't all that eventful really.


 

Similar Threads

  1. Age of starting school
    By TeaAndToast in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 30-04-2015, 13:58
  2. Replies: 13
    Last Post: 24-02-2015, 16:15
  3. School drop off / meeting other parents
    By dragonfly84 in forum Young Parents
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 12-02-2015, 19:27

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Tambo Teddies
Visit our online store and select your individually handmade natural sheepskin teddy bear. Our soft and loveable bears come in a range of styles and colours. Created in Outback Queensland each bear is unique individual. 100% Australian made!
sales & new stuffsee all
True Fairies
True Fairies is the first interactive website where children can engage and speak with a real fairy through the unique webcam fairy portal. Each session is tailored to the child, and is filled with enchantment and magic.
Visit website to find out more!
featured supporter
121Temps
For the last 10 years 121 Temps has helped thousands of personal assistants/others to set up and work as a virtual assistant from home. Our services include: - One-2-One Mentoring - Online training/courses - Handbook, Toolkits, Templates & more.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!