How do you tell your toddler 'No'? | Page 3 | Bub Hub
+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 30 of 30
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    990
    Thanks
    1,149
    Thanked
    565
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Thank you ☺ Another good point about shifting the focus. Might help him learn empathy too ☺ And yes, shorter sharper messages, over and over, are probably key as well.

    Ps I'm sure there's nothing i can say to assuage 8 years or so of guilts, but i think all parents understand that you can't keep your eyes on them constantly and things do sometimes just happen despite all your best parenting ☺

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    17,745
    Thanks
    5,085
    Thanked
    8,681
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Awards:
    Past Moderator - Thank you
    100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by JustJaq View Post
    Thank you ☺ Another good point about shifting the focus. Might help him learn empathy too ☺ And yes, shorter sharper messages, over and over, are probably key as well.

    Ps I'm sure there's nothing i can say to assuage 8 years or so of guilts, but i think all parents understand that you can't keep your eyes on them constantly and things do sometimes just happen despite all your best parenting ☺
    That will indeed live with me forever and will probably come up at his 21st birthday!
    Two books that'll bang on about because they were my bibles were "Children are People Too" by Dr Louise Porter (it goes by a different name now but if you find her site, you'll find it) and Raising You're Spirited Child by Mary Sheedy Kurcinka.
    I will admit though that it's been four years since I had a new born.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to misskittyfantastico For This Useful Post:

    JustJaq  (06-01-2016)

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    906
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    290
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    The oven is our battle at the moment too. He likes to get baking dishes out of the drawers and put them in and out of the oven copying us. I find if we are cooking then he wants to join in which is when it's most dangerous obviously. We don't have anyway of childproofing our kitchen, and none of the safety things you can buy actually fit on our oven to stop him opening it.
    I find if I set him up with an activity next to us and keep engaged in it with him at the same time whilst cooking then it seems to work. Like getting him set up with his train set and keep talking to him, asking him to do certain things or show me certain cars etc.

    As for the cat, we have the same issue with the dogs. He always wants to get into their food bowls and try to hand feed them one biscuit at a time. They get really cranky and I worry about it. I've started using the consequences by letting him be near then but warning if he touches their food he has to come inside. I do one warning, then on the second I move him in and close the door. We are a few days in and he seems to be getting it.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to SoReady For This Useful Post:

    JustJaq  (06-01-2016)

  6. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    4,037
    Thanks
    1,587
    Thanked
    2,032
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by JustJaq View Post
    For example, pulling the cat's tail is something DS loves doing, but I can't seem to get him to stop! I thought that a few scratches from our cat would stop him, but nope, DS keeps doing it! Poor cat...
    My DS has been the sort of kid who will keep doing something despite already getting hurt doing it before. He split his head open running near the steps inside a few weeks ago - 3 stitches! - and yet he just keeps running! It's a bit of a shock as my first was more naturally cautious and only had to hurt herself once to learn not to do it again.

    I childproofed 100x more with him. I had luggage straps wrapped around cupboards that I didn't want to stick child locks onto, a playpen, every drawer/shelves in his room were anchored to the wall so that that could be his safe space.

    As PPs have said though, they do lose interest and, after moving house recently, there are no child latches any more and I even have my stemware back in the kid-height display cabinet - at 2.5 he's just not interested. So hang in there, in the scheme of things it is just a short stage they go through.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Stretched For This Useful Post:

    JustJaq  (06-01-2016)

  8. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    990
    Thanks
    1,149
    Thanked
    565
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Thank you.

    Speaking of spirited children, i saw this the other day. Lol ☺
    Attached Images

  9. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to JustJaq For This Useful Post:

    binnielici  (17-07-2016),DT75  (08-01-2016),smallpotatoes  (16-07-2016),Tiny Dancer  (06-01-2016)

  10. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    444
    Thanks
    160
    Thanked
    157
    Reviews
    0
    I like this thread, the other day my FIL told me I shouldn't need baby gates as my 11 month old DS should just understand No and where he's not allowed to go. I doubted myself for a second but I wish I had said that we enforce boundaries where necessary but let him have as much freedom as possible... and I pick my battles because I can't and don't want to hover over him every second.

  11. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,872
    Thanks
    621
    Thanked
    2,269
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I am having quite a time with my just-turned-3 daughter. She seems to delight in being naughty, and either laughs/runs off/ignores me when I tell her no, unless I really lose my shiz with her (then I feel like a complete b!tch).

    So I tried to explain the effect her behaviour has on me (you know, the stuff Child Psychologists tell us we ought to do, etc)...
    Me: "When Lucy is naughty, it makes Mummy sad".
    Lucy thinks about this for a second.
    Lucy: "When Lucy naughty Mummy sad? Mummy want some medicine?".

    Not the response I was after

    Sent from my SM-N910G using The Bub Hub mobile app

  12. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Sunshine Coast
    Posts
    2,922
    Thanks
    2,356
    Thanked
    2,039
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    My two eldest daughters are 11 and 9. Dd1 was a placid little girl, dd2 was my spirited child and ran off on me, laughed and ignored me when she was a toddler. Wouldn't want to hold my hand to cross the road and would drop to the ground screaming blue murder when she didn't get her own way. She's a lovely smart kid and grew out of it. It's a stage and kids push buttons lol. I will be going through it again in a couple of years as Dd3 is 4. 5 months old...yay..not.

    No doubt your little cherub is just being a normal 3yo.

    I used to just tell them no and direct them to something else. I still have no dramas saying no.
    Last edited by Marchbundle; 16-07-2016 at 23:31.

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to Marchbundle For This Useful Post:

    J37  (16-07-2016)

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    990
    Thanks
    1,149
    Thanked
    565
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    @J37, you'll have to train her!

    "When Lucy naughty Mummy sad? Mummy want some wine?"

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to JustJaq For This Useful Post:

    Ruby_Tuesday15  (17-07-2016)

  16. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,872
    Thanks
    621
    Thanked
    2,269
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by JustJaq View Post
    @J37, you'll have to train her!

    "When Lucy naughty Mummy sad? Mummy want some wine?"
    The answer to that question is always a resounding "yes"!!

    Sent from my SM-N910G using The Bub Hub mobile app

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to J37 For This Useful Post:

    JustJaq  (17-07-2016)


 

Similar Threads

  1. What would you like to ask your toddler?
    By Catkin in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 02-09-2015, 11:23
  2. SOS toddler
    By loulou21 in forum General Sleeping & Settling Chat
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-03-2015, 20:10
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 18-02-2015, 10:32

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Free weekly newsletters | Sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
sales & new stuffsee all
Juju Menstrual Cup
JuJu Reusable Menstrual Cup is made in Australia from hypoallergenic medical grade silicone. JuJu Cup is convenient, eco-friendly and economical. Make the switch to JuJu Cup today. Use promo code bubhub at checkout for a 20% discount.
featured supporter
GymbaROO
GymbaROO offers activities for babies & toddlers in a fun learning centre, focussing on developmental education. Classes are available Australia-wide. Enrol today & help your child to reach their full potential. Visit the website to find out more.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!