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  1. #11
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    My 2.5 yr old is being screened for asd and spd. Some of the things you mentioned are one or the other. But can (alone) be seen as "normal". I would see the pead and mention everything that you think is even a but of a worry too you. Give them the best picture of what you are working with.
    If you do that you will get the best path to follow. But please remember to be kind to yourself to.
    Make sure you stop and play silly games with him. My boy is non verbal and playing with him is the only real time I get a happy boy. Enjoy those moments and the hard ones go out the window a lot easier.

  2. #12
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    Does that sounds like ASD or am I dealing with something else?
    Impossible to say. As a mother with a child who has been formally diagnosed with ASD, the diagnosis of ASD is detailed as other conditions can mimic it - as was the case with my other child. (His day care was convinced he had ASD but it turns out he didn't). Sensory processing disorder is not a recognised standalone condition in Australia. Other conditions that are recognised, such as ASD, have SPD as an associated condition or symptom. (One of my children has it, the other does not). Your child also has language. This is a positive indicator under the new guidelines that he does not have ASD as a lack of language is a primary indicator according to my child's diagnostic team. (Aspergers is no longer a standalone condition - essentially it doesn't exist anymore).

    The diagnostic regimen for ASD is also quite detailed and in depth, far beyond the scope for those who have no medical knowledge. This is why I now avoid Facebook groups and the like dedicated to ASD as I find that they are manned by parents who feel they know more than the professionals and it only muddies the water in an already murky pond. I also find that info sites that outline "signs of ASD" also list traits that are present in other conditions. For example, the often rolled out "toe walking" trait can actually be a sign of parasites. For the record, my child did not show this trait at all. He also maintains great eye contact - another aspect that blows people out of the water with their homogeneous theories

    I think what you were told about his speech being the source of his frustration is valid. It could well be that he has problems with expressive and/or receptive language. Different routines and change in environment can also upset.

    Is my child just disobedient or is there something wrong?
    From what you've written? Honestly, to me your child sounds quite normal behaviourally actually! He doesn't belt the **** out of his sibling, doesn't try to kill the family pet, doesn't spit and utter strings of profanities, or throw rocks at the neighbours, goes to the toilet in the toilet as opposed to anywhere he likes or rolls in it.... He also seems to be at his level for his age too - my 4.5 year old isn't.

    Good luck.
    Last edited by Mrs Tickle; 17-01-2016 at 18:25.

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    bezzy  (17-01-2016)

  4. #13
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    Default Autism

    Hey I have to agree with PP.
    my ds 7 has ASD
    Every child is different so my child has completely different sensory issues and strengths/ weaknesses to ur child etc. your story reasonates with me a lot I too was approached by daycare for a tirade of things, I had explanations for them we sought out help did therapy had psych assessments everything came back as situational, or explainable.
    As he got older more things became obvious, and for me it was having my second child and noticing that she was different as in talking, socialising, etc. definitely see a paed. I saw two, I don't take to labels lightly as this is something forever, under the DSM 5 we had two years of speech reports and ot reports two paed reports a hearing test, 2 psych school visits, his adenoids and tonsils removed and then finally the ADOS assessment, after all of this and given the HX of autism in the family (paternal cousin) he was DX. I don't think anyone here can tell you, It's a journey that's different for everyone if I had a dollar for everyone I asked if they thought he had it I would be so rich and 95% of those people said no. But he does and now it's more obvious, but the good thing is he has lots of therapy and he's definitely doing ok.
    Pm if u want to talk more. More than happy to help u, I was lucky I had people there for me and it made all e difference. They are beautiful and such special children with the most amazing gift ❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️ ️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤ ❤️

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    Mrs Tickle  (17-01-2016)

  6. #14
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    Any update SA Girl?

  7. #15
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    @SAgirl, I have popped into this thread a couple of times with the intention of responding, but haven't until now.

    I do think the behaviours/traits you've outlined may indicate that your DS has ASD, however he could be on the milder/high functioning end of it.

    You are doing the right thing by pursuing a diagnosis. My best friend's DS displayed some ASD traits when he was a toddler at day care - the staff mentioned it, but at the time she and her DH dismissed it. Their friends and relatives balked at the suggestion too. They just thought he had a quirky personality and challenging spirit. He continued on through primary school until at age 9 a new teacher flagged concerns (he was performing fine academically, it was more his lack of social skills/anxiety/fidgeting that stood out), and they proceeded with a formal diagnosis, where it was confirmed he has ASD.

    To this day, people will be quite dismissive about his diagnosis with comments like "oh, but he looks normal" The thing is, they are people who have no idea of the level of anxiety he experiences. Often the higher functioning kids are the ones that hold it all together in public, then fall to pieces when they get back home in their own environment They don't realise that he still needs his mum to wipe his bottom, remind him to eat, remind him to do almost everything relating to self care.

    *If* you find out your DS is on the spectrum, he will receive funding for the NDIS. He'll be entitled to a funding package for therapies. You will have the resources to help him in the areas he needs. It's been invaluable to our family - my DS has made amazing progress in the last year. Our friends are often commenting on how far he has come.

    He either has it or he doesn't - if he does, you'll get help. If he doesn't, you can move forward. He is who he is, and you will all be okay no matter what the outcome

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    Wise Enough  (18-01-2016)

  9. #16
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    ^ I was that family member insisting my nephew was fine and it was just him being 4. Most 4yos can't listen and sit still. It wasn't until I saw him around his peers I realised he was different.

    I still recall my sister losing it at me one day saying this is hard enough without having to convince you guys its true.

  10. #17
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    *If* you find out your DS is on the spectrum, he will receive funding for the NDIS. He'll be entitled to a funding package for therapies.
    Hate to correct here but this is not automatic. High functioning and low functioning are meaningless phrases. NDIS have a specific criteria which has changed considerably since the pilot programme was rolled out and you must undergo eligibility testing. They can also demand further evidence if the diagnosis is not clear enough to them which can mean further testing. Also, once admission to the NDIS is granted, the package is decided upon by the planner which varies greatly.

    I have one child that qualified and one who did not. I have gone (and continue to go through) through hell and high water with one child. I have rolled in unison with the other.

    Whatever the outcome, you can't prepare for this. You simply have to roll with it and hope that you come out the back end intact

  11. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs Tickle View Post
    Hate to correct here but this is not automatic. High functioning and low functioning are meaningless phrases. NDIS have a specific criteria which has changed considerably since the pilot programme was rolled out and you must undergo eligibility testing. They can also demand further evidence if the diagnosis is not clear enough to them which can mean further testing. Also, once admission to the NDIS is granted, the package is decided upon by the planner which varies greatly.

    I have one child that qualified and one who did not. I have gone (and continue to go through) through hell and high water with one child. I have rolled in unison with the other.

    Whatever the outcome, you can't prepare for this. You simply have to roll with it and hope that you come out the back end intact
    Well yes, you are correct it's not automatic - I really just wanted to reassure the OP that a firm diagnosis of ASD results in funding from the NDIS.

    It is harder for families without a firm diagnosis. My own adult brother has an intellectual disability and is unable to live independently, but my mother recently lost her carer's allowance and it looks like they'll be pushing shiz uphill to get any funding to assist him with living independently. Not being labelled with a specific disability makes it tough.

    I've been told that a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder level 1, 2 or 3 is what the NDIS are looking for when they review reports for funding applications.

  12. #19
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    how do we know what autism 1, 2,3 curious for feedback my son was Dx under the dsm v - it clearly says autism spectrum disorder - Asperger's syndrome. I hope this isant going to cause issues its annoying that the criteria keeps changing or he wording. I'm not asking for the earth I just want subsidised therapy.

  13. #20
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    Well yes, you are correct it's not automatic - I really just wanted to reassure the OP that a firm diagnosis of ASD results in funding from the NDIS.
    No, I meant not automatic as in eligibility. Even with a diagnosis you may not get it. You can be put down at a level requiring substantial support but there needs to be evidence of 'a significant support need'. The diagnostic report only supplies you with evidence required. They make the final assessment and base their decision on that. As was in my case. As I wrote in my earlier post, one child got it, the other didn't. Both have formal diagnoses. Level 1 and 2. I have health cards for both. I'm not the only one who's fallen off the back of that wagon either. There are many others in the same boat. The system is woefully overloaded, the projected need was vastly underestimated and there's simply not enough money to go around. This is why we're experiencing slow cuts in the welfare system. Schoolkids bonus? Gone. Vaccination bonus? Tighter and gone for some. FTA and FTB? Keep an eye out this July.

    Put it this way: the government has robbed Peter to pay Paul.
    Last edited by Mrs Tickle; 27-01-2016 at 06:08.

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    Cherry18Bloss  (27-01-2016)


 

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