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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScubaGal View Post
    Her opinion is based on medical fact that yes, my son is the size of a 1 year old and so could probably survive without the four feeds overnight but just like OP, I come to Bubhub all the time to question her professional advice.
    !
    Seems like this is a medical advice V parenting philosophy/lifestyle difference thing.

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  3. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScubaGal View Post
    Hang on a tic there is such a think as clouded judgement - it's entirely possible a GP would have a particular world view on this issue as they may on natural vs medicalised birth or breastfeeding vs formula
    As can a parent or the forum they frequent.

    I do get the RIC argument. But I liken it to someone I knew when I had my first child. She was so utterly anti formula that her child was literally starving and the Dept was ready to take her child before she gave him a bottle. Some people get so over zealous over a parenting philosophy it affects their child negatively.

    I'm not saying this is the case with the OP. I'm not saying the Dr was right or wrong, I'm not medically trained. But he said 'may'. This most certainly doesn't mean she should rush out and get him circed, far from it. But I think some mothers get so nuts over the topic they are blinkered to the fact some boys need to be circed.

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  5. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    I'm not saying this is the case with the OP. I'm not saying the Dr was right or wrong, I'm not medically trained. But he said 'may'. This most certainly doesn't mean she should rush out and get him circed, far from it. But I think some mothers get so nuts over the topic they are blinkered to the fact some boys need to be circed.
    Yeah, but when there is less than 1% chance that medical circumcision is necessary it seems odd that a doctor has come in, pulled back on a 4 year old's foreskin, declared it tight and mentions circumcision as a possibility when it doesn't really sound like there's anything major going on. A red tip sounds like a sign of infection. It has happened to my boys from time to time, especially at pre-school age. A bit of nappy rash cream cleared it right up. I didn't even bother taking them to the doctor when it happened.

    SAgirl, like others have suggested, seek a second opinion. Medically necessary circumcision is rare, but maybe there was something that alerted to the doctor to the idea of circumcision that he didn't explain properly to you (which is poor practice). At least with a second opinion you'll know whether circumcision may be something that you need to consider, or that this doctor's knowledge on foreskins aren't up to date and you can ignore what he said.

    ETA - From the information provided it sounds like the doctor's concerns (my uneducated guess this is! I am not a doctor) relate to balanitis, which is common in the ages of boys who can't retract their foreskin yet, and can be cleared up with ointments, creams, and good hygiene. Or possibly balanoposthitis, which again can be treated with creams, ointments, good hygiene, and if required, antibiotics. The 'tight' foreskin (phimosis), is normal in boys who's foreskin doesn't retract, and requires immediate attention if it is causing problems with urination...which hasn't been mentioned, or if it's causing pain and discomfort during intercourse, which is of no concern for SAgirl's son. Balanitis and balanoposthitis may require circumcision if they are occurring so frequently and is causing phimosis. For a doctor to walk in, look at a child who is visiting the doctor with the problem for the FIRST time, and mentions circumcision as a possibility my instincts would be to ignore that doctor and see someone else if my son had an issue again.
    Last edited by Full House; 19-12-2015 at 07:11.

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  7. #54
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    Default At what age?

    @J37 is ballooning the only reason it is ever appropriate for a medical professional to mention medical circumcision?

    Nobody has said not to seek a second opinion, or that it's wrong to ask advice...it's more the jumping to conclusions, that a GP that does an examination and says *may* is automatically labeled as being wrong and pushing a circ agenda. And the idea that he's even the final say in this discussion. Even if he pushed the issue there would always be a second opinion by somebody much more qualified because he's not qualified to do the surgery.

    This is going in circles. Peace out.

  8. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by HollyGolightly81 View Post
    @J37 is ballooning the only reason it is ever appropriate for a medical professional to mention medical circumcision?

    Nobody has said not to seek a second opinion, or that it's wrong to ask advice...it's more the jumping to conclusions, that a GP that does an examination and says *may* is automatically labeled as being wrong and pushing a circ agenda. And the idea that he's even the final say in this discussion. Even if he pushed the issue there would always be a second opinion by somebody much more qualified because he's not qualified to do the surgery.

    This is going in circles. Peace out.
    Agreed, it is going in circles. I don't even know how ballooning came in to it when SAgirl never mentioned it, but my understanding is that ballooning can be a normal process during the separation of the foreskin. Ballooning does not automatically equal circumcision.

    I'm out too
    Last edited by Full House; 19-12-2015 at 07:12.

  9. #56
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    All this hysteria surrounding the big bad C word is the reason my son suffered through 12+ months of pain, instead of just getting a freaking circumcision. I agree with PP's that this anti-circ movement has swung way waaay too far in the other direction. If it's medically indicated, it's medically indicated.

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  11. #57
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    Default At what age?

    Quote Originally Posted by Full House View Post
    . For a doctor to walk in, look at a child who is visiting the doctor with the problem for the FIRST time, and mentions circumcision as a possibility my instincts would be to ignore that doctor and see someone else if my son had an issue again.
    That doctor has seen and heard more than you and you were still able to give some pretty darned detailed advice.
    Last edited by VicPark; 19-12-2015 at 08:11.

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  13. #58
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    My DS had struggled tight foreskin, phimosis, ballooning, balanitis (requiring bladder drain) and constant infections and requiring steroid creams, he is now 9 and we haven't had him done yet. We are still riding it out in the hope that as he gets older it will settle. It's not looking good but things can change.

    Our next step is a surgeon on advice from our GP who says we have enough medical grounds to have it done but to get it checked by the appropriate person.

  14. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    Seems like this is a medical advice V parenting philosophy/lifestyle difference thing.
    No my point is that I think this is one where the doctor is influenced by culture/religion/opinion ... And possibly jumping straight to an aggressive option rather than offering conservative treatment

  15. #60
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    Default At what age?

    This thread has gone sideways. People are saying we jumped on the Dr - someone show me where??? I've just skimmed and I can't see it on first page and then after that, things went sideways and other symptoms came in to it that were mentioned by other people. Not the OP!

    SAgirl said some thing like "I don't really want to go down the circ route, but what are the other options". She never said she wouldn't. Just she didn't want to. BIG difference. If my DS had ONE issue and a Dr told me he needed to be circ'd, I'd feel the same. It also sounds like there is a bit of history with the senior dr with her comment about if she'd known it was him, she'd have walked out.

    The Dr went straight to possibly needing to be circ'd. No mention of creams or other possible solutions. THAT is what concerns me, not the mention of circ'ing. When my son had the issues, there was no mention of circ. There was no pulling back of the foreskin. My Dr looked but didn't tug/pull/retract. It was "it's probably a fungal infection, get this cream, use it for a few days and if things don't clear up, come back". It cleared up for us like it has for many other posters here. So I find it very odd the Dr didn't say to even try that. He didn't give a referral to a surgeon either, so he basically let SAgirl leave with no treatment or options! I'd be in here asking for advice too in her situation.
    Last edited by Californication; 19-12-2015 at 10:54.

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