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  1. #1
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    Default Can your child recognise numbers and letters?

    My son is 4 in March and I don't know if I should be worried yet or not, but he can't really count and he doesn't know anything in the alphabet. I just sat down with him for 45 minutes trying to teach him a little of the alphabet and we can't get past the letter 'A' despite me telling him what it was 5 seconds before. I said, while pointing, a,b,c,d. Then asked him what this letter was. Q he replies. I don't know if he is just not listening and mucking around but it somewhat frustrated me after a while and I stopped. We went onto numbers and I count to five. I have heard him count to ten before but when we sit down and help him with getting a bit better he just mixes everything in the wrong order.
    I want to try teach him how to write his name but is there any point? I know I should be patient but I've been trying to help him with these things for well over a year.
    He would start prep the year he turns 5 right? I guess I'm just worried that he will be behind everyone and nothing I seem to be doing is helping.

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    Don't worry too much about that stuff. My DD is 4yrs3mo and totally age-appropriate in her development and she doesn't recognize letters or numbers. She can count to 10 in the sense that she can recite the numbers in order, but if I ask her to count a group of objects she'll often get it wrong it there's more than 4 or 5. She has just started recognizing her name (they've been doing a lot of activities at daycare to get the kids to learn to recognize their names).

    If he's not interested in learning it, it will be next to impossible to teach it to him!

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    My 4 year old DS (he's 5 in Feb) counts beyond 100, recognises numbers beyond 100 and can fluently read (self taught).

    This is all pretty impressive, but he has ASD and is behind for his age in a lot of the important 'school ready' stuff, like fully independent toileting and self care.

    Socially he's not on par with his peers either. I'm thankful we still have all of next year to get him ready for school (he's starting in 2017).

    Do you have an ipad or tablet? There are so many great apps for letters & numbers available. My DS is a very visual learner and I believe his exposure to these apps has really helped.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mod-Degrassi View Post
    My 4 year old DS (he's 5 in Feb) counts beyond 100, recognises numbers beyond 100 and can fluently read (self taught).

    This is all pretty impressive, but he has ASD and is behind for his age in a lot of the important 'school ready' stuff, like fully independent toileting and self care.

    Socially he's not on par with his peers either. I'm thankful we still have all of next year to get him ready for school (he's starting in 2017).

    Do you have an ipad or tablet? There are so many great apps for letters & numbers available. My DS is a very visual learner and I believe his exposure to these apps has really helped.
    We don't have a tablet. I was thinking would those leap pads help? The ones with letters and numbers etc. I think he would just see it all as just a toy/game though and not take any of it in.

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    He is only 3. Too early to be worried and I wouldn't do anything unless he showed interest.

    My son is 5.5 and I honestly don't know if he knows all his letters and sounds. He can say the alphabet. He knows how to count and add numbers together.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    He is only 3. Too early to be worried and I wouldn't do anything unless he showed interest.

    My son is 5.5 and I honestly don't know if he knows all his letters and sounds. He can say the alphabet. He knows how to count and add numbers together.
    I don't want to be worried but I kind of am. He doesn't show any interest at all but I still try to help him out. Not sure how he is at day care as the one he is attending is really slack and doesn't write up anything they did during the day and he's not going to be attending for a few months due to financial reasons.
    I know he will get it eventually but I'm just a worry wart

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    Pretty sure boys show interest in that kind of literary learning later on, don't they?

    My DD is 4.5 and can recognize some letters, some numbers, (points them out above the aisles when shopping) and if I ask her to write her name, and tell her each letter, she can. That's the extent of it and honestly, letting all that time limit stuff around learning has really lifted off a layer of stress. We read stories, we talk about things, she questions stuff. She'll get it, when the time is right - and I'm sure the same is true of your son.

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    You can get a leap pad, but you don't really need it.

    In terms of teaching him to count, I used to count out objects in their presence. Eg

    * at the supermarket get him to help you put fruit and veg into a plastic bag and count them as they go in.

    * get him to help you put toys away and count them as they go into the toy box.

    * when tidying up have race as to who can pick up the most of stuff up and count it all out at the end to see who won.

    * go for walks around the neighbourhood and look at numbers on letterboxes and letters on street signs. Get him to point out all the fours he can see or all the A's on street name signs.

    * when reading to him run your finger slowly under each word so he starts to associate letters with language. Get him to find all the letter whatever on each page. I always used to start with the first letter of their name as got them interested.

    Hope this helps

  9. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to SSecret Squirrel For This Useful Post:

    Mod-Degrassi  (25-11-2015),Mod-Nomsie  (25-11-2015),Mod-Uniquey  (25-11-2015),sajimum  (25-11-2015),wobbleyhorse  (25-11-2015)

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    Quote Originally Posted by fluffykitty View Post
    We don't have a tablet. I was thinking would those leap pads help? The ones with letters and numbers etc. I think he would just see it all as just a toy/game though and not take any of it in.
    A leap pad might help, but I'm not sure as we've never used one.

    What I like about the ipad is that the whole family can use it. DS also watches YouTube clips for children (there are SO many) including alphabet songs etc.

    I don't think it's an essential though - I actually like a lot of @SSecret Squirrel 's suggestions.

  11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Mod-Degrassi For This Useful Post:

    sajimum  (25-11-2015),SSecret Squirrel  (25-11-2015)

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    I can't really remember what my DD knew at that age, but she's now 5.5 (starts school next year) and knows most letters, numbers up to 20, sounds of about 10 letters. She wasn't interested for ages and it wasn't until she started 4 year old kinder that she decided she wanted to learn letters.

    My DS just turned 3 and recognises numbers 0-5 (and is mostly okay up to 10), can accurately count objects to 10 and recognises the first letter of his name. When he was interested in learning numbers recently we didn't do any "formal", sit down type learning, but I did try to incorporate it into everyday activities where I could. For example, as PP said, looking for numbers on letter boxes (he learnt number 2 first as that's how old he was - he was very excited about finding all the 2's whereever we went). We also did matching games with numbers (we borrow games alot from the toy library and I have made a few bingo games to play at home), found numbers on number plates, let him press the numbers on the microwave (I would just say, can you press 2,3,0 for 2 mins 30), etc. Honestly, I think you have nothing to worry about - before you know it he will decide he wants to learn numbers/letters and it will snowball from there.


 

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