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    Default Consent for Unaccompanied Minors

    Hi,

    H's ex-wife wishes for the kids to travel unaccompanied back home from a holiday, and expects us to collect them from the airport.
    They are going there with her, she will stay for 10 days and go home, and the kids for a further 5. She says our time with them can then start when we collect them (she had 15 days, so we would have 15 days).

    Every year, she needs H's permission to take the kids on this holiday (they go every year), as per their parenting agreement. She needs to inform him of chosen dates and plans BEFORE booking. He has always agreed.

    This year she has booked already and now sent the dates, with her plans.
    H is very uncomfortable with the kids travelling unaccompanied, and she refuses to discuss it.

    Can she go ahead with the unaccompanied minor consent without him? I know he can refuse consent for them to travel at all, but I am hoping it doesn't come to that.

    Aside from this problem, the dates she has given also don't suit as we will be overseas until 3 days after the kids are due home (usually she has 3 weeks, then we have 3 weeks, and we discussed this months ago as the plan before we booked our holiday, and again after).

    What can H do?

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    Default Consent for Unaccompanied Minors

    That sounds very frustrating. Can the kids mum pick them up from the airport and look after them for the three days until you and DP are back from your holiday? On a side note, who are the kids holidaying after their mum has gone home?

    I'm not sure about permissions needed for unaccompanied minor travel. If your DP feels strongly about this could he request the kids come back with their mum instead of staying an extra 5 days.

    I'm not sure of your general relationship with the kids mum but if it's somewhat ok I'd try to discuss it all before refusing travel.

    Good luck with all, these things are tough.
    Last edited by babyno1onboard; 16-11-2015 at 11:04.

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    For domestic travel I have never needed ex permission for the kids to travel as unaccompanied minors at the airport. Our parenting plan States I need his permission to take the kids on holidays but in order for him to enforce it he would need to put them on a no fly list. If he disagrees he has the option to take it to court and enforce the order that I need to bring them back etc.

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    You can call immigration and tell them you (the dad) wants to put a block on the kids passports. Means she cant travel with them without him signing it off firt. Happens all the time. if kids travelling alone (as long as over 16 I think) the airline should have the kids by their side feom handover from ex wife,through checkin and onto plan. Once landef they will Escort kids again through customs and collect bags to the dad who will sign for them again. Just call your airline to make sure that'd still what they do but the kids if not too younge should be ok to travel alone.

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    Airlines have the hostesses seat kids in a section where they can be supervised by staff and it's quite common apparently.

    Calling immigration to cancel passports for a 9 and 7 year old who are being put on a plane, supervised by staff then picked up by the other parent is OTT imo. I think picking your battles would be the best advice.

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    There needs to be someone nominated on the UM form to collect them on the other end. Could she change the kids' bookings to 3/ 4 days later when you guys will be home?

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    Quote Originally Posted by babyno1onboard View Post
    That sounds very frustrating. Can the kids mum pick them up from the airport and look after them for the three days until you and DP are back from your holiday? On a side note, who are the kids holidaying after their mum has gone home?


    I'm not sure about permissions needed for unaccompanied minor travel. If your DP feels strongly about this could he request the kids come back with their mum instead of staying an extra 5 days.


    I'm not sure of your general relationship with the kids mum but if it's somewhat ok I'd try to discuss it all before refusing travel.


    Good luck with all, these things are tough.

    No, she cannot. She is coming back as she needs to be at work.
    The problem is the unaccompanied travel (and the timing).
    They would stay with their mum's dad, as far as I know.


    Quote Originally Posted by Janesmum123 View Post
    For domestic travel I have never needed ex permission for the kids to travel as unaccompanied minors at the airport. Our parenting plan States I need his permission to take the kids on holidays but in order for him to enforce it he would need to put them on a no fly list. If he disagrees he has the option to take it to court and enforce the order that I need to bring them back etc.

    I know only one parent needs to sign the unaccompanied minor consent.
    H is not comfortable with this and as she won't discuss it, he is considering refusing permission for them to go on the holiday.

    Quote Originally Posted by kim85 View Post
    You can call immigration and tell them you (the dad) wants to put a block on the kids passports. Means she cant travel with them without him signing it off firt. Happens all the time. if kids travelling alone (as long as over 16 I think) the airline should have the kids by their side feom handover from ex wife,through checkin and onto plan. Once landef they will Escort kids again through customs and collect bags to the dad who will sign for them again. Just call your airline to make sure that'd still what they do but the kids if not too younge should be ok to travel alone.
    They don't have passports. We have no idea what airline she is looking at.
    This is out of state but in-country travel.
    H is not ok with them travelling alone before 12.
    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Airlines have the hostesses seat kids in a section where they can be supervised by staff and it's quite common apparently.

    Calling immigration to cancel passports for a 9 and 7 year old who are being put on a plane, supervised by staff then picked up by the other parent is OTT imo. I think picking your battles would be the best advice.
    I know, but H is not comfortable with it. They are his kids and she needs his permission, end of.
    No passports, no immigration.
    Oh, and we pick our battles...there is so much we could bring up, but won't and just want to deal with this.
    Clearly you don't think it's a big deal, but their father does. And I will not debate that.

    Quote Originally Posted by meredithgrey View Post
    Who's looking after the kids for the other 5 days after their mum comes home before them?

    I leave it to your husband - you'll be overseas as priorly discussed, she should have discussed dates before she booked and she needs to sort it out herself as you guys won't be available to pick the kids up from the airport.
    Her dad as far as I know, but as stated it hasn't actually been discussed.
    I am leaving it to him, just wondering what he can do.
    He can pull permission based purely on her not discussion dates beforehand, as per parenting agreement. She knows our overseas dates, and has for months.

    Quote Originally Posted by GrabbyCrabby View Post
    There needs to be someone nominated on the UM form to collect them on the other end. Could she change the kids' bookings to 3/ 4 days later when you guys will be home?
    Hmm, I didn't know that. In that case, she would be refused permission to allow them to travel unaccompanied, yes?
    No idea, I suggested that, but she just repeated "these are my dates."

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    Oh, and we have a fairly good relationship- her and I.
    We only clash over her refusal to give details- I know if H said it was fine for the kids to travel as UMs, we would only get departure and arrival dates. No airline info or times... as usual.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DT75 View Post
    Oh, and we have a fairly good relationship- her and I.
    We only clash over her refusal to give details- I know if H said it was fine for the kids to travel as UMs, we would only get departure and arrival dates. No airline info or times... as usual.
    So how is he going to refuse? Through court, parenting plans are not worth the paper they are written on unless both parents stick to them. I can pretty much do what I want and so can ex. The only way we can stop each other is through court which means time and money. And even in court he will need a good reason and she will have her side. Flying as an UM is not a risk to their safety or neglect. I'm not sure if you can somehow contact the airport and refuse their travel domestically, it may be possible. He can refuse them to go on holidays and she may respect his decision but she may not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Janesmum123 View Post
    So how is he going to refuse? Through court, parenting plans are not worth the paper they are written on unless both parents stick to them. I can pretty much do what I want and so can ex. The only way we can stop each other is through court which means time and money. And even in court he will need a good reason and she will have her side. Flying as an UM is not a risk to their safety or neglect. I'm not sure if you can somehow contact the airport and refuse their travel domestically, it may be possible. He can refuse them to go on holidays and she may respect his decision but she may not.
    Janesmum is right. His option is to go to court.

    This is one of those areas where the answer isn't cut and dried. Every couple will at some point in their parenting journey disagree over the appropriate age their kids can do something. The solution is the pretty much the same whether you are separated or together. You negotiate or one parent goes against the other parents wishes and does it anyway.

    I've let my eldest do things I know she's capable of that I know my DH wouldn't agree with. Nothing as serious as your H's situation but things I think based on my judgment of my kids they can do. Not often but I have done this.

    This is a difference of opinion between your H and his ex. Apart from going no to court there isn't much (I don't think anyway) he can really do.


 

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