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    Default How to find the right dog?

    I'm wondering how everyone has gone about finding the right dog for their family?
    I don't assume we're any trickier to please than others but we do have a few issues such as dd being scared of all dogs (but has never had a "constant" dog se could get used to) and ds2 was bitten by a small dog a month ago.

    We have two acres with neighbours on either side but space isn't an issue for a dog to run around in. Growing up in the country neither df not I believe in letting dogs inside, however we always make sure our dogs are comfortable and warm outside.

    I don't want to be an irresponsible pet owner and get a dog for ds1 who so desperately wants one and then leave it to do whatever because df and I are both working. I want it to be trained properly.

    I'm not keen on a little puppy because I know I will be the one getting up to comfort it when it cries all night long, and I will be the one replacing shoes or hoses or whatever it chews through when it gets to that stage. Obviously for these reasons a rescue dog would be best, but then how does one find a good family friendly rescue dog?

    I honestly have no idea! All I know is that we are finally ready to welcome a dog into our family but can't decide where to go from here! Can anyone help?

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    An idea if you want a specific breed is to contact breeders to see if they have any adult dogs they need to re-home. Sometimes breeders sell adult dogs that turned out no good for showing/breeding or will take back a dog to re-home if owners move overseas/get sick. So you don't necessarily need a puppy.
    Have a think about how much time you have to exercise, groom, spend time with and what kind of personality traits you're looking for. When I wanted a dog I used an online program like this http://www.pedigree.com.au/dog-breed...reed-selector/ it came up with a list of breeds which matched my requirements. I picked a Shetland sheepdog from the list and he turned out to be the most amazing dog! You could use this program to get an idea then look for that kind of dog in a rescue situation or try and get an adult from a breeder. Once you get the dog obedience classes are well worth the effort even for an adult dog for training and socialising. Happy dog 'hunting'!!

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    If you're after a rescue dog, they should be able to guide you with one that is friendly and good with kids. Personally, I'd stay away from nippy breeds, but that just based on my experience of heelers not always being tolerant and neither are the likes of Jack Russell's.

    I think Katrina Warren has some good info on her site on known family friendly breeds. I know people with labs and they are good and I've never met a nasty border collie. Just do some reading on how much "maintenance" they need, temperament etc and take it from there with how much time you have to groom etc.

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    My dd was/is terrified of dogs/animals (she is 3 this month). We got a puppy 3 weeks ago and she has been fantastic with him. The first couple of days she was a bit apprehensive but absolutely adores him now. We got him when he was 8 weeks old but visited him regularly from 4 weeks old (every weekend). He truly has settled into our family perfectly. She has become much better with other dogs now as well.

    We are on nearly 2 acres so he has plenty of space to run around. Both my DH and I grew up with border collies so decided to go from that breed.

    ImageUploadedByThe Bub Hub1446345545.177469.jpg
    This is him at 8 weeks old.

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    Apart from one dog all of ours have come from the RSPCA so that has largely dictated what we ended up with. The RSPCA does an amazing job of categorising dogs by temperament and suitability for children. You can look them all up on their website.

    I really wanted a golden retriever so we got her from a local woman but otherwise we wound up with whatever they had at the RSPCA. Never been disappointed yet.

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    Get an adult rescue dog. Both mine are fabulous with children.

    My boy came from the Animal Welfare League ... And my girl was an abandoned abused ex-breeder but still under 2 years.

    AWL and the RSPCA and most small self funded rescues will have the rescue dogs in their homes as part of their family. They will be able to tell you exactly the temperament of the dog.

    Puppies are hard work. They require a lot of training. They chew everything. They're cute but hard work.

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    Places that rehome dogs (like the AWL - they are fantastic) will give you a "grace period" as well, where you can return the dog hassle free if they don't fit into your family. They would be very helpful in matching a dog to you, i.e. dogs from family homes who are used to children.

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    I think in all honestly if you want your kids to be attached to the dog and then you think dog has stay outside then maybe get a cat? Lol

    My DH was the same but I said its her dog now the dog sleeps at bottom of the bed etc. we are dog people though I guess?

    You need to pick a dog that suits your family. We own German short haired pointers. They think they are human I wouldn't own any other dog. Best for kids!!

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    I would say, be REALLY honest about how much time you will spend with the dog, walking it etc and choose a dog breed based on that. Unless you have a lot of time to spare, avoid a working dog or working dog cross (kelpies, border collies etc) as they can be naughty if they don't get loads of exercise.
    Staffys have a reputation for being quite needy and probably not suited to being an outside dog.
    Terriers and Jack Russells tend to be very loyal and will likely be your DS' shadow.

    There are lots of rescue places where they will rehome older dogs, the puppies tend to go first so there are some great older dogs out there to choose from. Sometimes the owners have passed away or gone into aged care and can no longer be kept. These dogs tend to be very gentle and used to not jumping up etc.
    If you are in Vic, Pets Haven at Woodend often have a large group of dogs both at the shelter and through their foster program, and if you can give them specific traits or size you are after they can generally find something suitable. PetRescue is a good nation-wide site for dogs available.
    Its great you're getting a rescue dog- ours is my little mate and I love her to bits!

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    Get a medium sized, older rescue dog. At least four so it's slowed down a bit and someone else has trained it. You'll be giving it the home it would otherwise struggle to get (people don't like adopting older dogs) and if it's a bit calmer, and you do the work to make it feel safe and loved, it might be happier just chilling as long as you teach it where it's safe bed is.

    Do not under any circumstances, get a kelpie or a shepherd, or anything crossed with either of these.

    Part lab would be good, as would be a blue heeler cross - one that is quite stumpy. If it has a nimble looking body, then it wants to run. You want one that looks like it likes child paced walks and naps.

    Funnily enough sometimes the very big dogs are excellent lazy house pets.

    Greyhounds too, great way to reduce an ex race dog, they are absolute lounge lizards.

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