+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    136
    Thanks
    56
    Thanked
    43
    Reviews
    0

    Default Behavioural issues, help required

    I'm not sure if this is the correct section, apologies if not.

    Im wondering what I should do for my 5 year-old son. He is extremely eloquent, smart and communicable at home. But in public, even around family he sees every day (but don't live with us) he is impossibly shy. He won't give eye contact (well, rarely), won't say hi and bye, he just becomes shy or very crazy silly. It's crippling him (and me) and makes it extremely difficult to deal with.

    He he also still has regular accidents because he won't tell me he needs to go. This is up and down though as when it's just us he will, and he is ok at kindy mostly but then goes through stages when he just has accident after accident anywhere and everywhere.

    No no changes or stressors in our life, he's been like this forever.... I'm most concerned about his extreme social anxiety as he starts school next year! What can I do? Who can I see about this?

    He he loves playing with other kids but usually introduces himself using toys so he doesn't have to speak.... That usually works and he'll often open up gradually but still talks very little if at all. So many people and kids have asked me what his name is or if he talks, because he won't speak to them but will play happily with them.

    Hes 100% normal at home, I can't stress this enough! Chats, has an excellent vocab, is cheeky, playful, imaginative, very good but also naughty just like a normal kid. I'm so stressed about this other behaviour though.... Please share if you have any advice!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    6,694
    Thanks
    1,185
    Thanked
    3,209
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    I would get him assessed to see if he's on the spectrum.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    2,218
    Thanks
    2,052
    Thanked
    1,917
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    No experience sorry, but I read an article recently about selective mutism in children. It could be worth looking into? The symptoms seem quite similar to what you're describing with your son. I'd start off with seeing a gp.

    http://www.selectivemutismcenter.org...electivemutism

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    3,377
    Thanks
    820
    Thanked
    1,104
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I think a trip to a paediatrician would be your best option. They can give their opinion and refer on for further testing if they feel it's necessary.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    136
    Thanks
    56
    Thanked
    43
    Reviews
    0
    Thank you for the advice. Interesting article frankenmum! He fits a lot of that profile but then has none of the other related behaviours. I discussed this with a couple of friends last night and they think he's perfectly normal! Just quiet. He plays well with other kids but takes a while to actually speak to them. Apparently he's fine at childcare too. I think he was bad yesterday which made me quite upset and come here for advice. Still, i am concerned a little as I'm certain his dad is on the spectrum but was never diagnosed. DS feels emotion though and I'm convinced his dad never does! I will see a paediatrician I think just to see if there's anything we can do. DS tries so hard, it must be so hard for him, my poor boy.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Botticelli For This Useful Post:

    Frankenmum  (01-11-2015)

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    2,218
    Thanks
    2,052
    Thanked
    1,917
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    It's good that he talks to others once he warms up, even if it takes him a while. I was a painfully shy child, and I eventually outgrew it. I guess nowadays they would have called it social anxiety. Definitely worth speaking to a paediatrician though, as they may be able to refer you on to a specialist who can give you tips to help your DS feel more comfortable and confident with interacting with others, and hopefully put your mind at rest about ASD.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Frankenmum For This Useful Post:

    Botticelli  (01-11-2015)

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    136
    Thanks
    56
    Thanked
    43
    Reviews
    0
    Yes I think you are right and that's what I will do at this point. Yesterday (and it's happened before) he wet himself in public when we met up with my nan and aunt. I believe he was either too scared to ask me to take him or he was too anxious to be 'present' in the moment. I think I've finally realised just how hard this is for him and that he is not growing out of it on his own. Thanks frakenmum

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to Botticelli For This Useful Post:

    Frankenmum  (01-11-2015)

  11. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,106
    Thanks
    455
    Thanked
    455
    Reviews
    14
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Always go with your instincts and you seem to be concerned about his behaviour so I would have him seen by a paediatrician and assessed. At least then you know either way. The sooner the better with him going to school soon.

  12. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    690
    Thanks
    173
    Thanked
    188
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    My daughter has been diagnosed with selective mutism and with some therapy has made massive improvements. There is basically a spectrum of shyness and selective mutism is right at the extreme end. Some kids have shyness at this age that they do grow out of, but with selective mutism this doesn't generally happen and they need a little help along the way. The best bet would be to speak to your GP and see if your son should see a paediatrician for further investigations.

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to Sunnybambino For This Useful Post:

    Botticelli  (01-11-2015)

  14. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    690
    Thanks
    173
    Thanked
    188
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    If the GP does think this might be selective mutism, please feel free to private message me if you have any questions.

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to Sunnybambino For This Useful Post:

    Botticelli  (01-11-2015)


 

Similar Threads

  1. How much urine required for UTI test 2.5 year old?
    By Steph12 in forum General Child Health Issues
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 25-10-2015, 15:43
  2. Napping for 30 mins only - reassurance required!
    By akakura in forum General Sleeping & Settling Chat
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 12-09-2015, 11:53
  3. Omega 3 DHA. Anyone used and seen behavioural changes?
    By 2BlueBirds in forum Discipline & behaviour
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-02-2015, 15:45

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Nice Pak Products
Australian Made and Owned. The Baby U Goat Milk Skincare range is enriched with soothing goats milk sourced from country, Victoria. Goat's milk has a pH level close to that of our own skin and contains natural sources of amino acids and vitamins.
sales & new stuffsee all
True Fairies
True Fairies is the first interactive website where children can engage and speak with a real fairy through the unique webcam fairy portal. Each session is tailored to the child, and is filled with enchantment and magic.
Visit website to find out more!
featured supporter
Little Kickers NSW
Little Kickers was launched in 2002 in the UK and arrived Down Under in 2009. Our motto is “Play not Push” and we provide a positive fun-filled soccer program for children aged 18 months -7 years in a vibrant, group play environment.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!