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  1. #31
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    I saw a lady with a whole trolley full of formula at the check out, would have been over 20 tins. I thought it was odd.

  2. #32
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    When it first started happening I was working casually at a supermarket and initially thought it was for drug smuggling lol then it came out on the news about the contaminated formula

  3. #33
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    As frustrating as it is for the families here, I don't blame them for importing Australian formula. I wouldn't want to feed my baby something made in a Chinese factory :-/

  4. #34
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    There is actually a big business going on behind this. From what i know, those who are sending formulas to China are not necessarily sending them to their friends or family. Most of them are international students reselling formulas to Chinese customers at a profit price. For example, let's say a tin of formula is $20, they sell it for $30 or more. At least $10 of profit from each tin, even more when the formula is on sale, so very good and relatively easy money, and you don't have to pay tax.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by meredithgrey View Post
    The problem is though, even when the same companies (Nestle etc) are importing identical products into China as what is being sold in Australia, the Chinese will still opt for grey market formula purchased by friends/family outside China then purchasing from a store in China as there is so little trust.

    I wonder what their breastfeeding rates are? Obviously with such a high population even with a low formula-feeding rate there's is going be a considerable number of families requiring formula, but would still be interesting.
    I was wondering the same thing.

    I found this relatively recent article.

    It seems the rates are pretty dismal:

    http://www.bloombergview.com/article...eeding-problem

    Exclusive breastfeeding - 16% in urban areas and 30% in rural areas and on the decline.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by meredithgrey View Post
    Doesn't surprise me.

    This is a bit of a generalisation (and I really don't want to start an argument about bf vs ff) I find that a lot of Asian (Chinese, Vietnamese, Hmong mainly in my experience) women believe that formula is much much better for their babies then breastmilk. I think its potentially got something to do with socio-economic reasons, but all I know is that trying to convince them that breastmilk isn't bad is talking to a brick wall sometimes.
    I tend to agree, not everyone can afford formula and those who can, might think formula , especially those imported from overseas, is better than breastmilk.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by meredithgrey View Post
    Doesn't surprise me.

    This is a bit of a generalisation (and I really don't want to start an argument about bf vs ff) I find that a lot of Asian (Chinese, Vietnamese, Hmong mainly in my experience) women believe that formula is much much better for their babies then breastmilk. I think its potentially got something to do with socio-economic reasons, but all I know is that trying to convince them that breastmilk isn't bad is talking to a brick wall sometimes.
    Definitely. The article states that there has been a rapid decline in breastfeeding rates since the 1980s when China started to boom economically. I suspect that formula is viewed as something to aspire to being able to afford.

    It also references the traditional Chinese practice of women recovering for 30 days after the birth of a child. As wealth has increased, this traditional recovery period for the mother has expanded to hiring nannies to look after the baby and give them formula. I would imagine that would be a significant barrier to breastfeeding.

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  9. #38
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    OMG YES!!! Bubs has been on it since he was 9 weeks old...lately it's so freaking hard to find!!...shelves are empty! grrrrrr

  10. #39
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    Anyone had much luck transitioning their bub onto something else?


 
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