+ Reply to Thread
Page 7 of 20 FirstFirst ... 5678917 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 70 of 196
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,916
    Thanks
    638
    Thanked
    2,324
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Homeschooling4 View Post
    Sorry, I'll get a lot of flack for this but there are so many narrow-minded, ignorant people here.
    Do any of you know any unschoolers or is it just what you've seen on youtube or heard?
    I'm sure there are those people who unschool for all the wrong reasons, but I can assure you I (along with many others who unschool) want what's best for out children. When we hear (or read) comments from people who usually have no idea how we're bad parents, our kids will hate us etc it hits a nerve. I've never said anything bad about people putting their children in main****** school. I love my children more than life and I'm sick of having to explain myself.

    Really research unschooling and look at it in depth. Talk to unschoolers, talk to parents of unschooled children, talk to adults who were unschooled. I've only mean unschooling for less than a year, I'm till learning, but it's the best decision i (and my kids and partner) have ever made.
    Very funny.

    By "un-schooling", you are by definition, narrowing your child's world. You've taken away structured education, social networks, opportunities for inspiration, etc...you've taken a potentially wide and interesting world, and narrowed it for them.

    Google "the benefits of formal education".

    Sent from my SM-N910G using The Bub Hub mobile app

  2. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to J37 For This Useful Post:

    bel2466  (01-07-2016),Billie2  (01-07-2016),DailyDiversion  (01-07-2016),Evee16  (04-07-2016),JR03  (01-07-2016),SSecret Squirrel  (01-07-2016)

  3. #62
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    2,066
    Thanks
    1,933
    Thanked
    1,499
    Reviews
    12
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Homeschooling4 View Post
    You register your child(ren) as homeschooled. Different protocols for different states. We're in Victoria. Here you fill out a form and send it in with child's copied birth certificate. Then if your child is in school you inform the school that you won't be coming back. In some states you have to show how you plan on teaching/how kids will learn (even naturally) set things like maths. In vic you dony do this, though I have made a portfolio anyway just in case.
    Does the education department monitor your children's progress in any way?

  4. #63
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    12,708
    Thanks
    9,558
    Thanked
    12,691
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 9/1/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 7/11/14Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 3/10/14100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by BettyV View Post
    Does the education department monitor your children's progress in any way?
    And/or do the parents?

  5. #64
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    my house
    Posts
    17,710
    Thanks
    1,392
    Thanked
    7,295
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts

    Default Unschooled bubhubbers?

    In NSW if you home school, you must follow the curriculum set by the board of studies.

    This all just reeks of "I know better!"

    I've been a teacher for nearly 20 years and still only feel 90% confident in teaching children how to learn to read.

  6. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to BigRedV For This Useful Post:

    Billie2  (01-07-2016),delirium  (01-07-2016),Evee16  (04-07-2016),harvs  (01-07-2016),LaDiDah  (01-07-2016)

  7. #65
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    3,431
    Thanks
    1,018
    Thanked
    2,081
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by littleriv View Post
    I was wondering the same thing- very specific maths, science etc exams to gain entry to nursing, medicine, law, teaching - all of which my kids are interested in- can admission to these courses be achieved through unschooling?
    Im genuinely interested in this point.

    For eg. Do you set up experiments at home to teach science? Do you teach the children in detail how all parts of the human body work? How would a child who has been unschooled be able to enter first year uni and write essays and take exams. Wouldn't it be completely foreign to them?

    Do they read novels? That haven't been chosen by them. I remember reading many books in high school that I wouldn't have necessarily chosen but that I ended up learning many things from.

    Im genuinely interested as I thought one of the goals of education was to foster a child's love of learning and Hopefully guide them to a career path they're going to enjoy and find worthwhile.

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Clementine Grace For This Useful Post:

    misskittyfantastico  (01-07-2016),rosey82  (01-07-2016)

  9. #66
    harvs's Avatar
    harvs is offline Winner 2014 - Spirit of BubHub Award
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    9,997
    Thanks
    6,239
    Thanked
    15,895
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 9/4/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 2/4/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 19/3/15Busiest Member of the Week200 Posts in a week

    Default Unschooled bubhubbers?

    I just had a quick squiz at a couple of resources to make sure I was on the right track.

    As a teacher myself, what I see as the philosophy behind unschooling is merely good educational practice especially in early years: play-based, aligned to children's interests, with an element of free choice.

    Although, just as an aside, the latest research actually suggests that the importance of different learning styles has been drastically overstated, and that students benefit from a range of learning opportunities to not only develop their 'strongest' learning style but also their 'weakest' style, which does not support some of the fundamental unschooling philosophy as I understand it.

    The difference is teachers are professionally qualified in best practice and delivery. We are required to maintain professional and training and development and to reregister periodically. We are accountable not only to the families of our students, but also our line managers. Our programs and plans are legal documents that need to be kept for a long period of time in case students sue the education department for not receiving an adequate education.

    I am required to follow a curriculum. There are some aspects (particularly some parts of Year 7 maths) that I have to revise constantly before I teach them. I can't imagine that I would ever teach those things if they weren't in the curriculum.

    I can get on board with alternative schooling and homeschooling, but it honestly astounds me that people can file a piece of paper to say they are unschooling, and from that point on no longer be accountable for the education that they do/do not provide for their child.

    And just as a personal anecdote, I have met several people as adults that were homeschooled. 100% of my (admittedly very small) sample had negligible social skills, almost no knowledge of a functional society, and extremely poor literacy and numeracy. I know that this isn't the case for everyone, but I am sceptical of a scenario where children's educational attainments aren't monitored to some extent and interventions put into place where deemed necessary.

  10. The Following 13 Users Say Thank You to harvs For This Useful Post:

    atomicmama  (02-07-2016),Billie2  (01-07-2016),cheeeeesecake  (01-07-2016),Chippa  (10-10-2016),Evee16  (04-07-2016),gingermillie  (01-07-2016),JR03  (01-07-2016),LaDiDah  (01-07-2016),misskittyfantastico  (01-07-2016),pointless1  (01-07-2016),Renn  (01-07-2016),rosey82  (01-07-2016),Silver flute  (02-07-2016)

  11. #67
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    17,747
    Thanks
    5,085
    Thanked
    8,691
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Awards:
    Past Moderator - Thank you
    100 Posts in a week
    Too hard tonight but what Harvs and Clementine Grace said.
    Learning how to learn and learning to love learning - not just what interests you, not just the things that come easily to you but learning HOW to learn is why I send my kids to school. Well that's one of many reasons.

  12. #68
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    817
    Thanks
    274
    Thanked
    378
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    What about things your children want to learn about that you don't have any knowledge or or aptitude in? I'm tertiary educated and would feel confident teaching my children maths, science, literature etc, but I have no ability/aptitude for art, creative writing, drama, languages other than English or music. I'm grateful that I received an education in these areas from teachers who specialised in them, but how would I teach a child art when I struggle to draw a stick figure? Or music when I don't play an instrument or read music? I want my children to have the opportunity to explore and learn things I'm not necessarily good at or interested in.
    I find it difficult to comprehend how unschooled children can't have huge gaps in their knowledge depending on their parents abilities. Nobody can do everything, we all have strengths and weaknesses, that's where I believe "traditional" schooling has the advantage.

  13. The Following 12 Users Say Thank You to rosey82 For This Useful Post:

    atomicmama  (02-07-2016),Billie2  (01-07-2016),BlackDiamond  (02-07-2016),delirium  (01-07-2016),Evee16  (04-07-2016),J37  (01-07-2016),KitiK  (02-07-2016),LaDiDah  (01-07-2016),Mod-Degrassi  (01-07-2016),Redcorset  (01-07-2016),TheGooch  (01-07-2016),VicPark  (01-07-2016)

  14. #69
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    3,431
    Thanks
    1,018
    Thanked
    2,081
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Homeschooling4 View Post
    .

    How the kids learn maths is through things like pocket money, shopping, saving, budgeting, cooking (measuring), playing games (scoring),
    They learn to read and write through games, books they enjoy, magazines, out and about (reading signs), TV, video games, helping to write shopping lists, Xmas lists, writing letters (they have a few pen pals), writing or typing stories or plays, cards and invitations. My son wants to get better at his writing because he thinks it's too messy (I don't think it is) so he traces over letters in a work book we bought at the store.
    They learn about science through living, how flowers and plants grow, etc.
    Children are naturally curious so when they ask questions "why is the sky blue?" "How come you can't put foil in the microwave?" "How does the remote make the TV work" all those things we look into in depth (if they're really interested) we don't just brush it off and say "don't know".
    They might be watching a cartoon and one of the characters says something. One of the kids want to know what that means.

    .

    Im genuinely interested in these points, I know it's just an example but they seem like pretty basic things you'd teach a toddler or small child? Also can kids really learn much from cartoons and video games?

    When talking about plants and flowers for eg. Do you teach scientific names of plants and about photosynthesis and pollination of plants? For older children for eg. do you teach the basic concepts of science like the periodic table of elements and how compounds are made etc. These are all "natural" processes but they do require a degree of theory based learning to fully understand.

  15. #70
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    2,057
    Thanks
    2,310
    Thanked
    1,390
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts

    Default Unschooled bubhubbers?

    Quote Originally Posted by J37 View Post
    Unfortunately, it seems so.

    I hope your children find employment and a fulfilled life, in spite of your decisions.

    Sent from my SM-N910G using The Bub Hub mobile app
    That's incredibly rude. You don't know much about the OP aside from that fact that her children do not go to school. You haven't walked a mile in her shoes and don't know her reasoning for taking her children out of school.

  16. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to babyno1onboard For This Useful Post:

    Angels4me  (01-07-2016),Candiceo  (01-07-2016),just her chameleon  (01-07-2016),Lauzy  (02-07-2016),Renn  (01-07-2016),Stretched  (02-07-2016),Yoghurt  (01-07-2016)


 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Boody Organic Bamboo Baby Wear
Softer than your bub's bum Boody Organic Bamboo Baby Wear
Australia's favourite eco brand has delivered a gorgeous baby collection. Made from organic bamboo, Boody's extraordinarily soft and stretchy, skin-friendly tops, bottoms, onesies, bibs and wraps don't 'cost the earth'. Get 20% OFF! Code BUBHUB16.
sales & new stuffsee all
True Fairies
True Fairies is the first interactive website where children can engage and speak with a real fairy through the unique webcam fairy portal. Each session is tailored to the child, and is filled with enchantment and magic.
Visit website to find out more!
featured supporter
Carmels Beauty Secrets
An online beauty and wellness site which offers simple and effective time saving methods and tips which help you look younger for longer.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!