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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by littleriv View Post
    Sorry if this has been asked before, but how do unschooled children het into tertiary education if they dont have yr 10 or yr 12 results? Can unschooled children sit exams to gain access to tertiary education?
    They can, it depends on the tafe and course. If you ring and ask they'll be able to tell you. My sister only did year 9 (actuslly dropped out half way through) and still got into tafe. There's ways around it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JR03 View Post
    You've hit the nail on the head. Imagine the disbelief of people in third world countries if they heard that it's actually a choice that people make to not vaccinate and not provide their children with education (in the conventional sense).
    Yes! I was coming in to make this exact comparison.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GucciDahling View Post
    Agree

    And to add, flame me if you like, but I see unschooling as the result of first world privilege. When there are millions around the world probably desperate for a proper education, especially girls, and yet we're able to turn our noses up at it as though we know better.
    I couldn't agree more. For centuries people across the world have held formal education in the highest regard. There is a very good reason for that.

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  6. #44
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    there are ways around it - for the right person in some situations - but its much harder.

    The thing that I find hardest to understand about a choice to unschool is the lack of other role models and instructors in the childs life.

    At school children learn to take instruction from others. From teachers, from other students (student councils, groups etc), from parent helpers, from sports coaches or library helpers or admin staff. They learn that they wont always like or respond to everyone, but they learn resiliance in dealing with those people. They learn to develop relationships and respect for others in those situations.

    they learn to work (and play) in groups. Not only those they like and are friends with out of choice, but those they dont know or sometimes dont like. They learn to make friends and how to join a group that is already formed. They learn leadership skills, and how to follow someone elses leadership.

    And those skills are all incredibly valuable as you get older and into adulthood. Valuable in forming personal relationships, in work, at home, wherever....

    Unschooling (by choice) means that the kids miss out on a lot of those things.

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  8. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Oh I completely agree with you on many levels, not everyone wants the 45 hour a week office job with the commute to the 'burbs. But I guess my issue is that a 10 year old doesn't know what they want. And by the time they do become an adult and decide they do want that life with medical degree that they can't access uni and are lacking the skills to live that life.

    I think alternative lifestyles are perfectly fine. My issue is you (a general you) are essentially deciding for your child. I'm not saying an unschooled child can never access uni. But the road is much harder.
    This is where my concerns with unschooling lie. Surely it's our responsibility as parents to keep as many options open for our children rather than inadvertently closing them through our choices. As a child I'm sure I would have been delighted to unschool! As an adult with 3 university degrees, including a phd, I'm so grateful that my "conventional" schooling allowed me to create the amazing career I now have.

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  10. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by BH-KatiesMum View Post
    there are ways around it - for the right person in some situations - but its much harder.

    The thing that I find hardest to understand about a choice to unschool is the lack of other role models and instructors in the childs life.

    At school children learn to take instruction from others. From teachers, from other students (student councils, groups etc), from parent helpers, from sports coaches or library helpers or admin staff. They learn that they wont always like or respond to everyone, but they learn resiliance in dealing with those people. They learn to develop relationships and respect for others in those situations.

    they learn to work (and play) in groups. Not only those they like and are friends with out of choice, but those they dont know or sometimes dont like. They learn to make friends and how to join a group that is already formed. They learn leadership skills, and how to follow someone elses leadership.

    And those skills are all incredibly valuable as you get older and into adulthood. Valuable in forming personal relationships, in work, at home, wherever....

    Unschooling (by choice) means that the kids miss out on a lot of those things.
    Sorry, but you're very wrong. Many unschoolers have a great social life, they learn all about how to socialise with people of all ages and different walks of life. They can and do even learn how to co-operate in structured settings too. They can line up, follow instructions if need be. We don't just sit home all day not getting out in the real world. My kids do things like sports, arts etc.
    I think if you ever come across an unschooler (or parents who unschool) and said this they'd laugh at you.

    My only regret with unschooling is not starting earlier. The only drawback (for me and many others) is the constant backlash, though usually it comes down to not understanding.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GucciDahling View Post
    Agree

    And to add, flame me if you like, but I see unschooling as the result of first world privilege. When there are millions around the world probably desperate for a proper education, especially girls, and yet we're able to turn our noses up at it as though we know better.
    Yep. A friend was recently telling me about a documentary they watched about a school in an African country. It was surrounded by a barbed wire fence to keep the kids who were not enrolled out.

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  13. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Homeschooling4 View Post
    Sorry, but you're very wrong. Many unschoolers have a great social life, they learn all about how to socialise with people of all ages and different walks of life. They can and do even learn how to co-operate in structured settings too. They can line up, follow instructions if need be. We don't just sit home all day not getting out in the real world. My kids do things like sports, arts etc.
    I think if you ever come across an unschooler (or parents who unschool) and said this they'd laugh at you.

    My only regret with unschooling is not starting earlier. The only drawback (for me and many others) is the constant backlash, though usually it comes down to not understanding.
    dont get me wrong - I am not saying that you (or any other unschool-er) doesnt engage in any of those things.

    But at school they do it 8 hrs a day, 5 days a week.

    with unschooling - its my understanding that its very child-led. So if the child doesnt like an instructor or a sports coach ... you would stop doing that activity. You socialise with friends and family ... with those the kids like and get along with.

    the kids arent put in situations where they have to learn to cope with the unfamiliar. Or learn how to get along with someone they dont like much ....

    that is at least my experience with families who unschool (some friends of friends who do this)

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    Quote Originally Posted by BettyV View Post
    This is where my concerns with unschooling lie. Surely it's our responsibility as parents to keep as many options open for our children rather than inadvertently closing them through our choices. As a child I'm sure I would have been delighted to unschool! As an adult with 3 university degrees, including a phd, I'm so grateful that my "conventional" schooling allowed me to create the amazing career I now have.
    Exactly. We prepare our kids in conventional schooling, if we want a twist to that we can look at Steiner or Montessori, or private religious. Then if they want to travel the world with just a guitar and busk, or live in a commune or do some kind of alternative living in their adult life then they can.

    And I also liken it to anti vaxxers who prefer to search google and read conspiracy sites over listening to medical professionals, thinking they know better. Teaching is so much more complex than most people think. There are so many layers to teaching reading and fractions, and programming for classes. Teachers are obviously professional educators, while some are crap they are professionally trained. Teaching kids to count the petals on a flower at 4 may seem easy, but if some of the teachers even in this thread explained the processes to teaching maths concepts, 99% of lay people would have no idea.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Homeschooling4 View Post
    So I'm a bad parent then?
    Unfortunately, it seems so.

    I hope your children find employment and a fulfilled life, in spite of your decisions.

    Sent from my SM-N910G using The Bub Hub mobile app

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