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  1. #181
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    Quote Originally Posted by BornToBe View Post
    Honestly, if you really want to learn about it, look it up. If you google "Homeschoooling authority VIC" you will find exact information on the how and why families are approved to homeschool their children in that state, and so on.
    My understanding is that unschooling is nothing like homeschooling.

    Homeschooling follows a set curriculum.

    Unschooling is child led.

  2. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSecret Squirrel View Post
    My understanding is that unschooling is nothing like homeschooling.

    Homeschooling follows a set curriculum.

    Unschooling is child led.
    DH and his brother went to a school in the 70s in Brisbane which would have come very close to unschooling. It was the Brisbane independent school and back then was nothing like it is today. It was completely child led. No class structure at all. If you wanted to learn great if not you sat outside with the chickens and played. No one worried if that's all you did 5 days a week.

    He loved it while he went but his parents panicked when he got to about year 4 and enrolled him in a main****** school. He was so far behind it was ridiculous. Took him about a year to catch up and suddenly for him and his brother it went from free as a bird "unschooling" to school and extra work and tutors because they were so behind. They were both reading and writing but that was it.

    He's very scarred by that experience.

  3. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by BornToBe View Post
    Honestly, if you really want to learn about it, look it up. If you google "Homeschoooling authority VIC" you will find exact information on the how and why families are approved to homeschool their children in that state, and so on.
    No worries, I just thought you knew the finer details so I thought I'd ask.

  4. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by BornToBe View Post
    The theory being that if a child shows an interest ir propensity toward that subject, they would be enrolled in specialist classes to ensure the gap is not too wide to enter university and study it. The thing is, there is no time limit to learning. Take me, again. I screwed up at school. Does that mean I can NEVER be an engineer? Of course not.
    Of course they can become an engineer if they want to. I didn't say that university would be off limits. I did say that unschooled kids would need to do a massive amount of work to catch up to peers before enrolling in uni. From my perspective unschooling creates hurdles for the child later in life.

    Anecdotally, I have a SN child who I take to tutoring. The tutor has my DD on a literacy program that she has handed out many times to kids who attend a community run school in my local district that seems to operate under the same principals as unschooling - child led learning, no set curriculum. 100% of the kids referred to DD's tutor from that school need to catch up on work they have missed during the primary years prior to attending high school. They are all behind and not just by a small margin.

    I understand that parents of children who aren't coping with traditional schooling feel the need to seek out alternatives. However, I personally do not view unschooling as a viable option because it is too child centric and does not appear to have any set outcomes or minimum standards.

  5. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to SSecret Squirrel For This Useful Post:

    atomicmama  (04-07-2016),delirium  (04-07-2016),Gentoo  (04-07-2016),Ruby_Tuesday15  (04-07-2016),Sonja  (04-07-2016)

  6. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonja View Post
    DH and his brother went to a school in the 70s in Brisbane which would have come very close to unschooling. It was the Brisbane independent school and back then was nothing like it is today. It was completely child led. No class structure at all. If you wanted to learn great if not you sat outside with the chickens and played. No one worried if that's all you did 5 days a week.
    That sounds a lot like the community run school in my local area that I referred to in my other post. (Not the same school, just very similar)

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    I expect the statistics of learning outcomes for unschooled children is greatly skewed due to the values of many people who choose this option. I'll emphasise that I have said SOME, not all, but I expect enough to distort any data.

    If you have studied the historical role of formal schooling in Australia, you will understand that it comes from a base of socialising children so they will be compliant and productive employees. While it has evolved, this is absolutely still some of it's purpose. Australia needs 'growth' to continue to support the apparent ideals of our economy.

    However, what if you questioned the concept of "continued economic growth" at it's core? Why do we need to keep working, buying, using - all at the cost of our environment and the lobg term future?

    So, if you were choosing to "live off grid" or "step off the hamster wheel", then you are potentially not going to value formal educational outcomes the way society does.

    I know it all sounds like a radical ideal, but a lot of things were "out there" once upon a time.

    I have read quite a bit about the unschooling movement. I think my biggest disappointment is that it is being driven and the "evidence" to support the idea comes mostly from one guy who used to be a teacher in the US. So much of the "schools fail because" comments don't apply because our schools are different.

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  9. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by BornToBe View Post
    The theory being that if a child shows an interest ir propensity toward that subject, they would be enrolled in specialist classes to ensure the gap is not too wide to enter university and study it. The thing is, there is no time limit to learning. Take me, again. I screwed up at school. Does that mean I can NEVER be an engineer? Of course not.
    Are you an Engineer?

    Sent from my SM-N910G using The Bub Hub mobile app

  10. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stretched View Post
    So, if you were choosing to "live off grid" or "step off the hamster wheel", then you are potentially not going to value formal educational outcomes the way society does.

    I know it all sounds like a radical ideal, but a lot of things were "out there" once upon a time.
    But where do you draw the line (A general you, not you specifically)?
    In a country where education is at our fingertips, and a curriculum based on years of practice that is (mostly) successful, should parents be able to potentially give their children a lesser chance?

  11. #189
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    I don't normally put much trust in this site but this link might point people in the right direction regarding research. It also has a link to a 60 minutes interview with an I schooling family.

    http://www.mamamia.com.au/unschooling-in-australia/

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    Default Unschooled bubhubbers?

    Quote Originally Posted by BornToBe View Post
    The theory being that if a child shows an interest ir propensity toward that subject, they would be enrolled in specialist classes to ensure the gap is not too wide to enter university and study it. The thing is, there is no time limit to learning. Take me, again. I screwed up at school. Does that mean I can NEVER be an engineer? Of course not.
    Ok I'll go out on a limb and say yes. If someone was unschooled for 12 years they'd have almost no chance of becoming an engineer. Honestly it would take them so long to get where they needed to get to and then do the actual degree. Going to school also teaches you discipline and working extremely hard. The amount of study alone would defeat most people who study engineering let alone someone from an unschooling background.
    Last edited by Sonja; 04-07-2016 at 17:16.

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