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  1. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by Homeschooling4 View Post
    I don't know how to put links up, sorry..

    But if you look on youtube about homeschooling and unschooling (TEd talks are great), talk to others who are or have been unschooled, look at the pros and cons.. It's all out there to be research. Read unschool blogs, meet and interact with unschoolers (parents and children).
    Do you have any actual research? I think people are after studies not just unschoolers opinions. I would love to read more but only if it is fact based.

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  3. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonja View Post
    I like main****** education for kids that work in that mould. Like me. I thrived in a selective school environment where education and music and sport were the only thing that mattered. I excelled in that environment. I did law at uni and also did extremely well at that.

    Then I had a daughter with extreme anxiety who is also profoundly gifted. And I watched her get lost in a main****** school system that failed her daily. I also watched my eldest suffer bullying to the point she became depressed and self harmed.

    Needless to say I spent about a year desperately trying to find somewhere else to send them. It's extremely fortunate for me that DH and I have the income to send our kids to very expensive schools that meet the needs of our kids and they are both now very settled and happy.

    What if I hadn't had the income though? How many other kids don't have the luck DH and I have that even with 4 kids we can afford to find the best school for each of them even if it means they end up at different schools.

    I see so many of my friends without the means whose kids have additional needs who are beside themselves over their kids and their experiences at school.

    Yes schools are improving but maybe it's just where we live but it's not fast enough. Class sizes of 25 or 26 are way too much for my DD to handle as she doesn't cope with noise.

    I wouldn't home school as I know myself and I don't have the patience for it. I'm also not a Sahm. But I can definitely see why parents do it.

    And most seem to come around to it after their child struggles at a main****** schools. It's often not the first choice for the first child.
    I completely agree with the sentiment behind your post. I think though the difficulty some of us have isn't with home schooling, it's with unschooling. I'm still waiting to see any information that shows me the practical differences between unschooling and just not going to school because the parents can't be bothered (or whatever reason).

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  5. #163
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    But isn't your DD in a steiner/Montessori/IB school Sonya? There is a huge difference between that and unschooling. The former still has qualified staff, and while it is often self directed learning it is within a basic curriculum framework. There is also accountability with these alternative schools. There is none with unschooling. If there was there would be issues bc homeschoolers are meant to stick to a curriculum, US's don't do that so how do they get away with that? Clearly bc there is no monitoring or accountability.

  6. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by Homeschooling4 View Post
    I don't know how to put links up, sorry..

    But if you look on youtube about homeschooling and unschooling (TEd talks are great), talk to others who are or have been unschooled, look at the pros and cons.. It's all out there to be research. Read unschool blogs, meet and interact with unschoolers (parents and children).
    That's anecdotal stories not quantitative research though. Of course the parents are going to push their agenda.

  7. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    That's anecdotal stories not quantitative research though. Of course the parents are going to push their agenda.
    I've been reading along quietly and looking for studies along the way. So far, I've only found one study, comparing main******, home schooled and unschooled children. It had a small sample, with only 12 unschooled children, so there isn't much merit to it, but the unschooled children fell below the line.

  8. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    But isn't your DD in a steiner/Montessori/IB school Sonya? There is a huge difference between that and unschooling. The former still has qualified staff, and while it is often self directed learning it is within a basic curriculum framework. There is also accountability with these alternative schools. There is none with unschooling. If there was there would be issues bc homeschoolers are meant to stick to a curriculum, US's don't do that so how do they get away with that? Clearly bc there is no monitoring or accountability.
    I think you may have missed what I am getting at.

    my girls are just at normal Anglican schools. But one with a huge amount of money to throw at resources. My son is at an IB school with even more money.

    I'm not comparing their school with unschooling or homeschooling. I'm just explaining the lengths and expense I have had to go to to get my kids the education they need and I think deserve. If my circumstances were different we may have homeschooled.

    If you're kids are fairly neurotypical and you can access a good state school well then you're laughing. But I still don't believe in the main many state schools cope with kids that are outside the box. In my eldest's class in year 4 she still had 2 kids that were almost illiterate. They just stared into space or put their heads down all day and were largely left alone.

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  10. #167
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    I've read over the posts in this thread and am left with one question that I'm interested in hearing the answer to:
    What employment prospects do you expect your unschooled children to be facing come adulthood?
    Money is far from the be all and end all, but in an increasingly professionalised workforce, the reality is that the majority of professions require some form of formal training to even get a look in, (whether it be a school certificate/diploma/degree etc).
    I've seen you mention that all of these qualifications remain possible for unschooled children, but it seems they would be facing a gargantuan effort to become eligible for entry to a tertiary institution...before even completing their qualification or getting a job.
    Why choose such a torturous path for them?
    (Okay, I guess that's two questions!)

  11. #168
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    Quote Originally Posted by atomicmama View Post
    I've been reading along quietly and looking for studies along the way. So far, I've only found one study, comparing main******, home schooled and unschooled children. It had a small sample, with only 12 unschooled children, so there isn't much merit to it, but the unschooled children fell below the line.
    What line do you mean when you say they fell below the line?

  12. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonja View Post
    What line do you mean when you say they fell below the line?
    Whoops, I should have been more clear. They fell below grade level.

    http://www.parentingscience.com/home...-outcomes.html

  13. #170
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonja View Post
    I think you may have missed what I am getting at.

    my girls are just at normal Anglican schools. But one with a huge amount of money to throw at resources. My son is at an IB school with even more money.

    I'm not comparing their school with unschooling or homeschooling. I'm just explaining the lengths and expense I have had to go to to get my kids the education they need and I think deserve. If my circumstances were different we may have homeschooled.

    If you're kids are fairly neurotypical and you can access a good state school well then you're laughing. But I still don't believe in the main many state schools cope with kids that are outside the box. In my eldest's class in year 4 she still had 2 kids that were almost illiterate. They just stared into space or put their heads down all day and were largely left alone.
    Sure, I get your point and I completely agree with you. As individuals we need different things educationally, and unfortunately yes, money helps (don't even gets me started on the equality debate lol)

    But I guess my point is there are options other than unschooling. Many public schools are becoming very diverse learning environments. There are the above schools popping up everywhere. I kind of place unschoolers in a category similar to anti vaxxers and imho it's not beneficial for kids.


 

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