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  1. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Mmmmmm. Cider.
    DP's homebrew deeeelicious

  2. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renn View Post
    oddly enough, i kind of get this. I still insist on my daughter having her hair brushed, but I'm uncomfortable about it!
    Yeah I get it too. I hate forcing my daughter to have things done to her body she doesn't want. It goes against what I teach her about her body being her own. I still do things like brush her teeth, give her medicine and do her hair when she doesn't want it, but I feel uncomfortable and disrespectful.

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  4. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    That reminds me of a blog post a few years ago that went viral about a woman that never brushed her kid's hair bc they didn't like it. She felt pressuring them to have their hair brush was akin to assault. Needless to say it copped a lot of criticism. As parents it's our job to ensure our kids get what they need to develop and grow physically and emotionally.
    I am a bit like this with DS. He has long curly hair (just below shoulder length) & providing he washes/conditions brushes his hair every Sunday & allows me to check through it for nits 2 x a week he does not have to brush it. For us though, it is more a case of there is only so much I am capable of with other issues, and between teeth brushing & hair brushing I have made the choice that having his teeth brushed properly twice a day is more important than having his hair brushed. It gets very knotty, however he doesn't get teased about it (used to about the length but he doesn't care about that, he still wants it long) and for him it is a complete non-issue.

  5. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by cheeeeesecake View Post
    Oh dear, I have been browsing some unschool facebook pages. In the interest of "children choose what they want to do or not do", one mother was saying her child needed 10 TEETH pulled out of her mouth, because 'we dont enforce teeth brushing'. I just think there are some things that kids are not equipped to make their own decisions about for their lives. They need some adult direction, surely. Education, and teeth brushing, are some things that if the child doesnt want to engage in, it's the adults job to enforce it!

    ETA - there is also a lot of posts about nutrition. Someone who's child was obese because he was allowed to eat whatever he wanted, whenever he wanted - because who am I as the parent to restrict their own choice and autonomy - so the child lived off of chips, coke and lollies, and suprise; became obese. Many others like this - "I offer my child to choose whatever they eant and they choose candy for dinner. Why dont they choose vegetables?" Lol. Ohhh dear oh dear.
    There's unschooling and there's radical unschooling. These people would be radical unschoolers. Children make all their own decisions in regards to bedtimes, food/eating, hygiene etc..

    I'm not a radical unschooler, my children have set bedtimes (we draw the line at 11pm), they are encouraged to brush their teeth daily as well as shower. I provide them with a balanced diet too.

    Personally I coulnt do radical unschooling, but it works for others.
    We unschool only through a learning sense.
    Last edited by Homeschooling4; 02-07-2016 at 00:10.

  6. #135
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    I'm seeing a lot of confusion between homeschooling and unschooling and how either work.
    As stated previously, the requirements for curriculum and oversight of any sort differ from state to state. In NSW for example, i daresay it would be very difficult to "unschool" to the extent that I'm seeing described here.
    I have experienced the bad side of homeschooling but I've also been exposed to the good. Homeschooling can be wonderful and offer incredible opportunities for children, just like main****** schooling. It just might run on a different schedule and take place between home, tutors and special classes - with other homeschoolers AND main******ers - and extra curricula activities (specialised music/art, electronics classes run by professors via co-ops, any sport you can think of, to give some random examples) as opposed to the one venue day in day out. It isn't the trainwreck some people seem to think it is.
    I can't really say anything for unschooling as my understanding of it is limited and it's not for me (I'm quite fond of homeschooling though, having seen both sides of the coin) but i don't think it's fair to flame someone for their choices in the name of curiosity.
    And yes I've also experienced public and private schools before and after my homeschooling experience so i feel that im not speaking out of my **** with no real life comparison or experience
    Last edited by Yoghurt; 02-07-2016 at 00:32.

  7. #136
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    In fairness i can understand the concern of parent's choice vs child welfare but that's something we wont all be able to agree on all the time about anything anyway.
    As parents we have that power.
    It worries me that some children might end up disadvantaged in some way from their parents choices (there are far worse ones than unschooling) but I'd hate to live in a country that took those choices away.

  8. #137
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    The people i know that have expressed interest in "unschooling" have only done so in regards to very early education so I'm not sure how it progresses beyond that point. So that's something I'd be curious to know more about. It's probably not impossible but i do understand the concern that these kids would then struggle with structured learning in tafe, uni etc. I'm definitely interested to learn more. Perhaps there can be a transition period toward the end of their un/schooling as preparation.

    As stated earlier, it's very easy to do TAFE courses (school cert, and HSC equivalents, and otherwise) and uni prep courses straight from a non main****** schooling background. I actually know many people who finished year 12 at conventional schools who then had to do this anyway to get the scores they needed and ended up further behind than those that did the courses after years of homeschooling. Funny that.

  9. #138
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    I think though, that the issue with additional study isn't just about how long it takes or how accessible they are. How is a young adult going to cope doing these modules at tafe or uni after years of no formal education and no experience with exams, handing in essays etc? They are coming from an environment of no benchmarks or one very much consumed with them, with meeting scores, marks, dealing with exam conditions.

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  11. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    I think though, that the issue with additional study isn't just about how long it takes. How is a young adult going to cope doing these modules at tafe or uni after years of no formal education and no experience with exams, handing in essays etc? They are coming from an environment of no benchmarks or one very much consumed with them, with meeting scores, marks, dealing with exam conditions.
    Again, there'd be a difference here between homeschooling and unschooling but you're not entirely wrong.
    My experience with homeschooling did involve entensive essay writing and meeting high standards but no there weren't exams per se. Some tutors etc do their own tests or exams and whatnot. I don't think it would be too hard to do practice runs of some sort with the same structure NAPLAN etc would follow, in order to prepare for something more formal.. although tafe HSC exams are also not quite like the classic high school experience either.
    From memory other than the odd standardized test scattered throughout school years (NAPLAN etc) the only prep for HSC isn't something only a school environment could achieve. What i mean is, you wouldnt sit there doing multiple practice runs before sitting "the big one". You would study in other ways and do perhaps ONE practice go first.

    Still a valid concern though, i do get where you're coming from.

  12. #140
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    It really does depend on how that individual was schooled. I guess that's why states like NSW have the standards that they do.

    Actually I wanted to say, before i forget, that i don't think it's terribly fair to say that because someone has seen homeschoolers with poor grammer etc that that is indicative of the standards of all homeschooling education, ie that we're a load of ****ing idiots.
    I see plenty of disgraceful writing from people who only ever went to conventional schools and even a conversation with them in person can be painful. I'd never point it out to them though, let alone in an online forum where people should feel comfortable being colloquial and are free to make typos.
    Just sayin.

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