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  1. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moxy View Post
    Yeah I get that, but I want to know what the literal differences are between unschooling and just not sending kids to school, aside from a label that covers the bums of parents from a legal POV. What differentiates the parent who decided to use the term "unschool" for their kids so they don't get in legal strife from the parent who just doesn't send their kids to school but doesn't know about the concept of unschool so doesn't think to use it? What is the difference in the education these kids are getting? I'm kinda confusing myself.
    So you want to know what's stopping a parent from saying they are "unschooling" on one hand, while actually bludging on the other?
    - good question. I wonder what oversight is in place?

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  3. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moxy View Post
    Yeah I get that, but I want to know what the literal differences are between unschooling and just not sending kids to school, aside from a label that covers the bums of parents from a legal POV. What differentiates the parent who decided to use the term "unschool" for their kids so they don't get in legal strife from the parent who just doesn't send their kids to school but doesn't know about the concept of unschool so doesn't think to use it? What is the difference in the education these kids are getting? I'm kinda confusing myself.
    I honestly don't know - my kids missed a certain amount of school because mummy was having kidney failure and we got letters from the school threatening DHS.
    Yet someone can homeschool/unschool?
    Uncool.

  4. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    I actually think this is a really valid point. From everything I have read, and what I've read in this thread, the learning that happens for an unschooling family is just a normal weekend day off for us. I could not send my kids and get the same results. When there is no accountability and no set plan, what can happen is what I described at the beginning of these discussions - lazy parents who would rather the kids sleep in until lunch, save a packet on uniforms, have no school pick ups or need for bedtimes. Not saying all unschoolers are like this - but really, I'm like you, I just see it as giving the kids no formal education and have them hanging around home.
    Same here. I unschool every day. Have done since they were babies. Last week I sat down with the boys and we went through my anatomy book (lots of pictures and diagrams) and I told them about childbirth, the heart and lungs and the eye. Stuff they showed an interest in after flicking through the book and stuff I have enough knowledge about to be able to explain to a 3 and 5 year old. These sorts of conversations (solar system, chemistry, biology, reading, history) happen organically all the time. But I can't for the life of me see how they'd be a substitute for an education that follows some sort of curriculum (whether that be home school, Steiner, Montessori, regular school, whatever). DH and I know lots of things about lots of topics between us (me in humanities, biology and English, he in maths, science in general, economics, history and religion) and engage in age appropriate conversation all the time. But yeah, I can't see how that's a substitute for a curriculum based education.

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  6. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by Homeschooling4 View Post
    I'm not the OP, but I guess you're asking me???

    Um... There wasn't any defying moment or anything. The girls were in school (prep and prep to grade 2), I was a single mum, wanting to travel a bit (didn't happen though ). I looked into alternative education as I wasn't happy with the current school system (I'm still not). Xmas/summer holidays one year we discussed homeschooling. Kids were happy. I was happy. I'd never heard of unschooling, but meeting with others who do this and researching it all made sense. Before that we were doing relaxed homeschooling (which id be quite happy to do again). Some of the reasons I like unschooling or homeschooling:

    More family time
    More time to travel/holidays in the off peak season
    No school schedules, not having to hurry home to pick kids up
    Kids can learn at their own pace
    No tests or grades
    No bribery or punishments (this goes for life outside of schooling too for us)
    Kids aren't being forced to plsy with children they don't like or who bully them
    Kids learn what they want and when
    Not competing for attention with 30 other students (only competing for attention with 3 other children instead lol)
    Diversity. There's many ways to homedchool. Some families use different methods for different children
    Seeing my kids reach their milestones and goals. Being around my children a lot (I do need an hour a day when they're aren't around.)
    Not having to get up early and do the school morning rush (apart from the two days they girls go to co-op), or when my youngest has swimming at 10.
    Sorry to pop in the thread kinda late but I've been reading along. I should mention I'm a teacher of nearly 20 years plus almost halfway through my Masters degree.
    I must admit that I've been reading the posts...and yours here is the one that got to me.
    I fail to see that
    Not hurrying to activities
    Not having to do pick ups
    Being forced to play with other children ??
    Travelling during off peak times. ..
    Etc..these really aren't valid reasons not to attend formal education.
    How does this help in the long run. ..when kids grow up and need to function in society and go to work at a set time. ..attend meetings. .get 4 weeks holidays a year and so on?
    These excuses only benefit the parent not the child.
    Sure schools aren't one size fits all. .. there are some other alternatives out there. Plus hopefully opportunities would arise to learn things otherwise not offered at home. An instrument perhaps? An art skill? Perhaps giftedness would be identified and options for acceleration. . Or debating clubs. .. science. .these sorts of extracurricular activities can't be met at home. Playing in an orchestra or competing at regional levels or national in sports?
    As much as I want to respect the parents who choose this type of 'schooling' I just can't.
    Parents all over the world fight for schooling for their kids. In fact I'm one of them. ..I'll be fighting for my daughter who has special needs to attend formal main****** education. For all is faults..of which no system is perfect. ..it sure does make a huge difference.

    **off to find scholarly articles or research on the efficacy of 'unschooling'.

    Ps sorry for mistakes! It's late.

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  8. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    So you want to know what's stopping a parent from saying they are "unschooling" on one hand, while actually bludging on the other?
    - good question. I wonder what oversight is in place?
    Yeah, that, but also is there a technical difference in what the kids are actually learning? Do unschoolers still follow some sort of "curriculum" that separates those kids from the kids that just don't go to school.

  9. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskittyfantastico View Post
    I honestly don't know - my kids missed a certain amount of school because mummy was having kidney failure and we got letters from the school threatening DHS.
    Yet someone can homeschool/unschool?
    Uncool.
    It's crazy isn't it? What I still don't get is that even home schoolers must follow a curriculum. How do unschoolers getting away with doing nothing? I'm pretty sure home schoolers are expected to submit work they are covering to prove it? Maybe unschoolers just lie and say they are doing it?

    And how ridiculous re. DHS. You should have just said you'd decided to homeschool lol

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  11. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskittyfantastico View Post
    I honestly don't know - my kids missed a certain amount of school because mummy was having kidney failure and we got letters from the school threatening DHS.
    Yet someone can homeschool/unschool?
    Uncool.
    Home schooling still follows a curriculum though. While it's definitely not my cup of tea, there's still some oversight and accountability for making sure a child has an education that allows them to transition into the workforce or main****** education when they're older. But yeah, could you have just turned around and said "we're unschooling" and everything would have been a-ok?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Moxy View Post
    Yeah, that, but also is there a technical difference in what the kids are actually learning? Do unschoolers still follow some sort of "curriculum" that separates those kids from the kids that just don't go to school.
    I would think following a curriculum would defeat the whole purpose of unschooling? Which is why I've been wondering how accountability works. But it really is just staying home and not going to school.

  13. #119
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    Oh dear, I have been browsing some unschool facebook pages. In the interest of "children choose what they want to do or not do", one mother was saying her child needed 10 TEETH pulled out of her mouth, because 'we dont enforce teeth brushing'. I just think there are some things that kids are not equipped to make their own decisions about for their lives. They need some adult direction, surely. Education, and teeth brushing, are some things that if the child doesnt want to engage in, it's the adults job to enforce it!

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  15. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moxy View Post
    Home schooling still follows a curriculum though. While it's definitely not my cup of tea, there's still some oversight and accountability for making sure a child has an education that allows them to transition into the workforce or main****** education when they're older. But yeah, could you have just turned around and said "we're unschooling" and everything would have been a-ok?
    But see it doesn't. I know a homeschooler ( a trained teacher no less) who will not teach her child any maths until she is year 6/11 years old.
    I know fabulous homeschoolers and really rubbish ones first hand.

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