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  1. #31
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    I had a couple of barbies when I was little. I always really wanted Peaches and Cream barbie that a neighbourhood girl had, because it came with that big boofy dress.

    I also wanted a Ken doll but made do by cutting the hair off my least favourite barbie so I couldn't have been paying that much attention to the body shape of the dolls.

    In terms of what women were supposed to look like it was my Mum who set the ideal in my mind. She had a mum body and mum boobs that I assumed I'd get one day (and I did).

    My various stints with eating disorders came instead from my Dad criticising what I ate, and kids at my school bullying me. Not from the barbie. I do think those teen girls magazines are bad juju though, Dolly, Girlfriend etc as they normalise weight obsession.

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  3. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScubaGal View Post
    I had a couple of barbies when I was little. I always really wanted Peaches and Cream barbie that a neighbourhood girl had, because it came with that big boofy dress.
    Oh I still want Peaches & Cream barbie. My cousin had one - so jealous!

    Trying to think back, I don't think I even registered that Barbie had a different body shape to normal - I guess she's a doll, not real, so why would she need to be the same as us?

  4. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by HomeSchoolMumOf4 View Post
    OMg it's a plastic doll. Get over it!
    My sister and I played with Barbies all the time as kids and we don't have body image issues. My girls and son play barbies too and they aren't thinking 'omg I'm so fat' they're just playing.
    Kind of what I wanted to say lol

  5. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScubaGal View Post
    I had a couple of barbies when I was little. I always really wanted Peaches and Cream barbie that a neighbourhood girl had, because it came with that big boofy dress.

    I also wanted a Ken doll but made do by cutting the hair off my least favourite barbie so I couldn't have been paying that much attention to the body shape of the dolls.

    In terms of what women were supposed to look like it was my Mum who set the ideal in my mind. She had a mum body and mum boobs that I assumed I'd get one day (and I did).

    My various stints with eating disorders came instead from my Dad criticising what I ate, and kids at my school bullying me. Not from the barbie. I do think those teen girls magazines are bad juju though, Dolly, Girlfriend etc as they normalise weight obsession.
    omg we used to do the same! never had ken dolls for some strange reason so we'd use the older/crappier barbies and cut their hair short and turn them into boys 😂

    we also used to get that liquid glue and put felt tip marker ink inserts inside the glue to extract the colour and create hair dye. the result would be dolls with hacked off, stiff, colored hair 😂😂😂

  6. #35
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    Haven't read any replies. I think barbies are ok from any age as long as their use is managed appropriately by parents.

    There's a world of difference between a girl having 20 "make me up" style barbies with 100 outfits and accessories and a girl or boy having an Anna or Elsa doll with a toy Sven for a sidekick.

    The later helps encourage a little imagination. The former *may* potentially lead to a kid growing up thinking looks and material possessions are more important than substance (which in turn *may* lead to body image and other issues).

  7. #36
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    Default Barbies - Fine or harmful?

    Quote Originally Posted by wobbleyhorse View Post
    - I guess she's a doll, not real, so why would she need to be the same as us?
    Because sometimes things add up.

    Maybe the Barbie doll body shape in itself isn't enough to send someone overboard. However combine that with the mother consistently talking about fad diets, the father making the odd joke about a fat woman, and the men's bikini magazines at kids eye level in coles... Well it all adds up to gender and other issues down the track.
    Last edited by VicPark; 25-10-2015 at 16:47.

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  9. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScubaGal View Post
    I had a couple of barbies when I was little. I always really wanted Peaches and Cream barbie that a neighbourhood girl had, because it came with that big boofy dress.

    I also wanted a Ken doll but made do by cutting the hair off my least favourite barbie so I couldn't have been paying that much attention to the body shape of the dolls.

    In terms of what women were supposed to look like it was my Mum who set the ideal in my mind. She had a mum body and mum boobs that I assumed I'd get one day (and I did).

    My various stints with eating disorders came instead from my Dad criticising what I ate, and kids at my school bullying me. Not from the barbie. I do think those teen girls magazines are bad juju though, Dolly, Girlfriend etc as they normalise weight obsession.
    I never thought to cut barbies hair to make a Ken doll but I did "borrow" my mums earrings to stick in Barbies head so she had dangly earrings. I still remember getting the barbie van it was a great day 😁

  10. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    Because sometimes things add up.

    Maybe the Barbie doll body shape in itself isn't enough to send someone overboard. However combine that with the mother consistently talking about dad diets, the father making the odd joke about a fat woman, and the men's bikini magazines at kids eye level in coles... Well it all adds up to gender and other issues down the track.
    True - I agree it all adds up but I guess those other things - such as mum & dad making fat jokes etc would still be an issue even if Barbie had an 'a' cup and 50cm waist. I think we (as parents) need to do some great role modelling ourselves to combat poor body image in our children.

  11. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by wobbleyhorse View Post
    True - I agree it all adds up but I guess those other things - such as mum & dad making fat jokes etc would still be an issue even if Barbie had an 'a' cup and 50cm waist. I think we (as parents) need to do some great role modelling ourselves to combat poor body image in our children.
    I agree parents need to be good role models, however I don't agree we should give up drawing the line in one area because other problem areas will still exist.

    I don't agree some of the problems mentioned will still exist. I mean of course kids will still be exposed to things in the media.... However parents have some control about what their kids are exposed to. If anyone makes fat jokes/talks about dieting in my house or within ear shot of my kids I tell them to zip it. Not overloading my kids with gender stereotyped or materialistic encouraging toys is just another part of my strategy to raise well rounded kids.

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