+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 39
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    5,747
    Thanks
    3,825
    Thanked
    3,655
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    I would be more concerned about social media (or media in general) than a harmless barbie. For me I loved barbies growing up and never once thought about their body shape - they were a doll after all. Similarly Lego man/woman had strange proportions but I never questioned that.

    My body issues came from an obsessive mother who commented on weight/size from the age of about 4/5 and a ballet teacher (this was the 80s) who constantly told us all we had to diet if we ever wanted to be successful dancers. This too from the age of 5. No wonder I always thought I was fat (and never ever was even close to overweight).

    If I am lucky enough to have a daughter I will totally allow barbies - I think denying them of them could potentially be worse (they will wonder why). I think it's important to install good self image and body confidence by what you do & say and remember you can't shelter them forever. TV and social media will give them a good dose of unrealistic body image and try as you might they'll get exposed to it sooner or later.

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to sunnygirl79 For This Useful Post:

    AdornedWithCats  (23-10-2015),SuperGranny  (23-10-2015)

  3. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    10,938
    Thanks
    2,608
    Thanked
    2,864
    Reviews
    14
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    My girls have Barbies and Ken etc.

    For me, it's not about the dolls/toys they play with that may be a bad influence in terms of body perception etc, it is the way 'I' role model to them (I have 4 daughters). They NEVER hear me say anything negative about my body, only positives. If they're with me and I am trying on clothes, I will say, things like it's not my style, as opposed to what I am thinking inside (my bum looks big in this etc).

    So yeah, not the dolls, but DH and I being healthy role models in the way we speak and act with our bodies around them etc.

  4. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Mod-Uniquey For This Useful Post:

    AdornedWithCats  (23-10-2015),atomicmama  (24-10-2015),Wise Enough  (23-10-2015),~Marigold~  (22-10-2015)

  5. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    5,747
    Thanks
    3,825
    Thanked
    3,655
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Mod-Uniquey View Post
    My girls have Barbies and Ken etc.

    For me, it's not about the dolls/toys they play with that may be a bad influence in terms of body perception etc, it is the way 'I' role model to them (I have 4 daughters). They NEVER hear me say anything negative about my body, only positives. If they're with me and I am trying on clothes, I will say, things like it's not my style, as opposed to what I am thinking inside (my bum looks big in this etc).

    So yeah, not the dolls, but DH and I being healthy role models in the way we speak and act with our bodies around them etc.
    So true. The older I get the more I realise just how much my mum's negative body image impacted my own. She still complains everything makes her look fat - this is exactly where I got it from. That and she used to tell me I had thick legs, that there were fat genes in our family and that if I wasn't careful I would end up big like my aunties etc. She never would have given a thought to how that would negatively impact my self image.

    Sorry to crash the thread. I just think PP advice was absolutely spot on 😊

  6. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to sunnygirl79 For This Useful Post:

    AdornedWithCats  (23-10-2015),Mod-Uniquey  (22-10-2015)

  7. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    2,841
    Thanks
    1,819
    Thanked
    1,421
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    As my DSD says, "It's a toy. I don't think dragons are real, and I have those toys too."

    She is 9 now.

  8. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to DT75 For This Useful Post:

    bezzy  (22-10-2015),BH-KatiesMum  (23-10-2015),Cue  (23-10-2015),Moxy  (22-10-2015),Ngaiz  (23-10-2015),PipersMummy  (22-10-2015),Raising Leprechauns  (23-10-2015),Rose&Aurelia&Hannah  (23-10-2015),snowqu33n  (22-10-2015)

  9. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Sunshine Coast
    Posts
    2,963
    Thanks
    2,383
    Thanked
    2,071
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    My youngest daughter is 8 and loves the Barbie movies, and to be honest, I am happy to sit down and watch them with her. My eldest daughter is into Monster High and those dolls are a little more out of proportion than Barbie. At the end of the day, who cares? They are dolls and if your daughter loves playing with them, then that's all that matters. I don't have a great self body image but my kids don't see that about me, they just think I am a great mum. Don't focus on Barbie's physical image, concentrate on all the amazing things she has been.

  10. #16
    PlayNice's Avatar
    PlayNice is offline Saving the world one chocolate at a time
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    367
    Thanks
    390
    Thanked
    525
    Reviews
    0
    Thanks all for your responses. I can definitely see the general concensus and it is reassuring!

  11. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    6,864
    Thanks
    4,773
    Thanked
    4,210
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week

    Default Barbies - Fine or harmful?

    I think barbies are what you want to make them. we had tons of barbies too and played with them lots. never once did Barbie's body shape or proportions enter into my mind as the "ideal" or something women should strive to emulate. she was just a doll with long skinny legs and a generous rack. my parents never mentioned barbies as being anything more than toys. I totally get where you're coming from and your concerns are valid but I think drawing attention to the fact that Barbie has an abnormal figure will just shift the child's focus onto it and away from innocent play.

    I'd be inclined to just say nothing and let the child play. if she starts asking questions or making comments about the doll's body shape or appearance, you could gently correct/explain things to her. but honestly I'd just leave it. what toy is anatomically correct? do toys have to be anatomically correct? are toy bears and stuffed animals anatomically correct?
    Last edited by turquoisecoast; 23-10-2015 at 07:25.

  12. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    7,160
    Thanks
    1,701
    Thanked
    3,395
    Reviews
    4
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    I had barbies as a kid. I loved them. I also cabbage patch dolls.
    I didn't grow up thinking that people had big b00bs and tiny waists or that they signatures on their bottoms and no n1pples.
    Lol
    I think we over think this stuff sometimes.
    I actually can't wait to play barbies with DD.

  13. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Tamtam For This Useful Post:

    Little Miss Sunshine  (23-10-2015),MrsSS  (23-10-2015)

  14. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Lala Land
    Posts
    1,599
    Thanks
    235
    Thanked
    376
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    My DD is nearly 8 and obsessed with Barbie. I dont think how Barbies body looks has even crossed her mind. Though she will tell anyone that asks that Barbie is a fako blonde.

    We work very hard at fostering a positive self image and encourage her to look at people on the inside. Hopefully this stays with her more than the image of a doll.

  15. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Brisbane North
    Posts
    4,460
    Thanks
    1,581
    Thanked
    1,802
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    to us, barbies are just barbies. dolls. toys, what they are supposed to be... heck i was playing with mine til i was 13!


 

Similar Threads

  1. 4.5 yr old vomiting but seems fine
    By yadot in forum General Child Health Issues
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 26-03-2015, 19:26
  2. Developing fine motor skills
    By 2BlueBirds in forum General Child Health Issues
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 17-02-2015, 10:34

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Nice Pak Products
Australian Made and Owned. The Baby U Goat Milk Skincare range is enriched with soothing goats milk sourced from country, Victoria. Goat's milk has a pH level close to that of our own skin and contains natural sources of amino acids and vitamins.
sales & new stuffsee all
Bub Hub Sales Listing
HAVING A SALE? Let parents know about it with a Bub Hub Sales listing. Listings are featured on our well trafficked Sales Page + selected randomly to appear on EVERY page
featured supporter
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!