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  1. #11
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    DS2 was a late talker, didn't really say much other than mama until he was about 24-25 months. He was 3 in July and about 1-2 months before his birthday his vocab just took off and now he speaks really well and in full sentences. He does have a lisp and I think an upper lip tie which I suspect we'll end up seeing a speechy for. Not sure if that was related to him speaking later. I think he was just doing things in his own time.

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    Hasselhoff  (14-10-2015)

  3. #12
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    I know a couple of 2 year old boys who don't say much other then gibberish.. I wouldn't be too worried yet just keep following up with GP.

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    Hasselhoff  (14-10-2015)

  5. #13
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    My boy was 2 in May. He is behind because of glue ear. He had his grommets done at 18 months and his speech slowly improved. Over the past few months he's had some MASSIVE improvements, and is now doing fine, though I still think behind where he would have been if not for the ear issues.
    If you're certain his hearing is fine I wouldn't worry too much, it can all start to happen very suddenly. I would personally get a hearing check done just for your own peace of mind

  6. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by misstrouble View Post
    DS is now 24 months and two months ago we had a speech pathologist assess him for the same reason - heaps of babbling but only a few clear words. She was really reassuring as she said boys are often slower but the majority catch up on their own. She also said the babbling was a great sign. Basically DS wasn't making many "oo" and "ee" sounds so we play lots of games repeating the same sounds eg rolling things down saying "wee". Also things like blowing bubbles, stopping, and getting him to say "more", and playing the same playschool cd in the car for repetition (this has made a big difference - he tries to sing along). Hope this helps .
    Thanks that's really helpful! I think I will try the bubbles. We make a ramp off the lounge and push cars down and I say 'wee' he just throws his hands in the air and laughs lol. The cd is a great idea. Dp will hate it haha.
    Thank you!

  7. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mod-Degrassi View Post
    OP, I personally think age 2 is a good time to make a call on whether you need to look into some speech therapy/hearing tests/evaluation for your DS. Some toddlers don't speak much until they get closer to 2, then they explode with a heap of new words/language.

    Here's a bit of a guide:

    A typical 2-year-old should:

    * speak in two-word phrases, like "more juice" and "go bye-bye"
    * follow two-step commands
    * name simple objects
    * have a vocabulary of 50 or more words
    * be understood at least 50% of the time by a parent

    Between 2 and 3 years, vocabulary continues to build and comprehension also increases. By 3 years of age, a child should:

    * speak in three-word sentences
    * have a vocabulary of 200 words or more (basically, more than you can count)
    * be understood 75% of the time
    * understand prepositions (such as, "put it on the table" or "put it under the bed")
    * use pronouns ("me," "you," "it")
    Thank you! That's great! Good guide to follow.

  8. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by CazHazKidz View Post
    My boy was 2 in May. He is behind because of glue ear. He had his grommets done at 18 months and his speech slowly improved. Over the past few months he's had some MASSIVE improvements, and is now doing fine, though I still think behind where he would have been if not for the ear issues.
    If you're certain his hearing is fine I wouldn't worry too much, it can all start to happen very suddenly. I would personally get a hearing check done just for your own peace of mind
    I'm not 100% certain his hearing is fine lol he's either really ignorant or something isn't right. But being so ignorant wouldn't surprise me. He could hear u open a packet of chips a mile away but ignores us lol do I see my doctor about a hearing test?

    What led your DS to getting glue ear? Or is not really known? I don't think DS has it. I honestly never heard of it until about 3 months ago so sorry if my question sounds dumb lol

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    Quote Originally Posted by Moxy View Post
    DS2 was a late talker, didn't really say much other than mama until he was about 24-25 months. He was 3 in July and about 1-2 months before his birthday his vocab just took off and now he speaks really well and in full sentences. He does have a lisp and I think an upper lip tie which I suspect we'll end up seeing a speechy for. Not sure if that was related to him speaking later. I think he was just doing things in his own time.
    Were you worried about him not talking?
    I think people around me are making me feel I should worry. I was actually enjoying the fact he couldn't back chat yet lol but everyone mentions it and it started making me think maybe he was a fair bit behind and everything on Google says he is 😒

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  11. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by BerryDelicious View Post
    I know a couple of 2 year old boys who don't say much other then gibberish.. I wouldn't be too worried yet just keep following up with GP.
    Thank you. I will probably get him to see our doctor in the next week or so (she's away this week) I'm not 100% sure but I think his ear is hurting a bit again. He won't keep his finger out of it and been very sooky. So as soon as we can see her I'll ask about his speech. She's very honest so that's a good thing.
    I have an appointment booked with a different doctor on Friday for him but I will cancel it if his ear improves. I'd rather speak to our normal doctor about his speech.

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    I think at that age he may very well just catch up over the next few months. However, for peace of mind I would certainly be organising an audiology review/hearing test to rule any issues out. Depending where you go there can be a bit of a wait so I would make an appointment earlier rather than later. My DD has had 3 lots of grommets now - prior to this last set being put in she had fluctuating results on hearing tests due to fluid in her ears despite no ear infections/pain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sajimum View Post
    I think at that age he may very well just catch up over the next few months. However, for peace of mind I would certainly be organising an audiology review/hearing test to rule any issues out. Depending where you go there can be a bit of a wait so I would make an appointment earlier rather than later. My DD has had 3 lots of grommets now - prior to this last set being put in she had fluctuating results on hearing tests due to fluid in her ears despite no ear infections/pain.
    Thank you. I think I might get him to do a hearing test. Do I need a gp referral? It seems to be a good idea just in case he isn't as ignorant as I think and really can't hear us.
    Oh ok, so if he has not so great results first time it doesn't necessarily mean his hearing is bad?


 

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