+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 12 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 119
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    4,094
    Thanks
    1,386
    Thanked
    1,357
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by DT75 View Post
    Actually I did say that you said daycare had said xyz... but they may just have been saying that, or not noticed it. That doesn't mean it's not a possibility.

    Again, I don't know his whole life, so have no idea if he has other markers. But FWIW, my brother only had one issue and was diagnosed with ASD at 6, and he is very obviously an ASD child now at 12.

    I didn't pick one thing, I'm trusting the opinion of qualified carers. It doesn't hurt to get an assessment, and if it comes back as him not having ASD, then you know it is the daycare.
    You also mentioned he had been to 3 in 3 years, but no reason- that was an indicator, to me, that he has problems with daycare.

    And I did speak about other things- paper situation etc.

    ETA: I do agree with the poster above that you have clearly lost trust here, and probably should pull him out.
    The reason he's been at 3 -

    The first was family daycare, he loved it but outgrew it and *we* felt it would be better to move him to a bigger daycare to ready him for school.

    2nd daycare - he was there for only a few months before we pulled him out because the centre was crap. He came home sunburnt a few times and also had an empty water bottle at the end of every day in the blazing hot sun (amongst other things) we pulled him out because *we* didn't like the centre.

    3rd daycare is where he is now.

    I agree that it's no issue checking it out to see if he has ASD, that's not my issue. My main issues are that it feels like he's being targeted for no reason at all. Well for minor reasons. And I feel that mentioning autism is quite sudden and for unwarranted reasons.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    4,222
    Thanks
    894
    Thanked
    3,218
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    The way the director just threw in a reference to ASD when she hasn't even had a meeting with you to discuss any concerns is just wrong and so unprofessional and tactless.

    In saying that though, you often mention your DS and his 'issues', tantrums, whinging and behaviours... so maybe they have seen some things there that they haven't yet mentioned to you? Maybe they've had some suspicions but weren't yet certain enough to mention it, until the director blurted it out?

    If I were you I would be calmly asking the director what she meant, and if she believes you need to do some investigating.

  3. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to CMF For This Useful Post:

    DT75  (09-10-2015),GrabbyCrabby  (12-10-2015),misskittyfantastico  (08-10-2015),Mod-Degrassi  (08-10-2015),Rose&Aurelia&Hannah  (08-10-2015)

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    2,555
    Thanks
    879
    Thanked
    559
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I would be concerned and ask the Director for an explanation pronto, but I would be more concerned about the little fellow's behaviour because the last thing any parent wants is their child to be singled out, or 'different'.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    1,833
    Thanks
    915
    Thanked
    1,419
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    I work with children every day.
    Lots of what you've written can be signs of children that are somewhere on the asd spectrum, I'm not saying he has it and it's not so black and white.
    I would ask for an interview with the daycare and see what's going on and what issues they are having with him.
    The fact that he's having a few meltdowns at age four at pre school is a bit of a concern. A lot of parents freak out at the mention of asd and maybe that's how you feel, many also go into complete denial and become angry towards the teachers trying to help.

    I'm not saying your child has asd but it won't hurt to see a paediatrician or seek intervention from early intervention services. At the end of the day you need to do what's best for your son and seeking help, sorting out the issues and helping him out are all that matter regardless of him having asd or not.

  6. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Reneeharry For This Useful Post:

    DT75  (09-10-2015),GrabbyCrabby  (12-10-2015)

  7. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,846
    Thanks
    6,200
    Thanked
    16,892
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Bubhub Blogger - Thanks100 Posts in a week
    With respect, while CC workers do work alongside ASD kids every day they are not qualified to be making diagnosises. A couple of years ago an inexperienced female teacher remarked that DS1 had symptoms of ASD which I actually found laughable. My child does NOT have autism and apart from poor impulse control (what 5 year old boy has it?) he has none of the other symptoms.

    I'm not saying your son doesn't have ASD. But I would wouldn't be taking their word as gospel that's for sure.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to delirium For This Useful Post:

    HappyBovinexx  (08-10-2015)

  9. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    4,113
    Thanks
    2,900
    Thanked
    3,329
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    My sister had some concerns raised about my nephew, by the swimming teacher and someone else. Day care didn't say anything. When he started kinder she asked them to keep an eye out for anything amiss. Within a week they called it and they asked for a meeting and said they suspected ASD.

    I didn't believe it. I saw nothing but a normal 4yo boy. Then I went and volunteered at the kinder one day and I saw it. It was wasn't till I saw him around his peers it stood out. I know it's not what you want to hear, I'm just saying keep an open mind about it.

    Definitely have a meeting and talk to them. Just knows he may not be being targeted, I often get told when they have had to speak to DD1 at care. It's about making sure we're on the same page. Sometimes I might feel like they don't know sh@t, but sometimes they have a valid point and I need to reevaluate something. Today I got told that DD keeps letting other girls try on her clothes, so I will have a chat to her tonight about that. They also said she seems tired and flat and asked said they don't think she's getting enough sleep. She's not but short of drugging her I don't think I can fix it.

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to Wise Enough For This Useful Post:

    DT75  (09-10-2015)

  11. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    At the beach
    Posts
    10,495
    Thanks
    1,430
    Thanked
    9,003
    Reviews
    3
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 17/10/14100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by Reneeharry View Post
    The fact that he's having a few meltdowns at age four at pre school is a bit of a concern.
    This really stood out to me. Really? Are kids of 4 these days suspected of something being wrong if they have a few meltdowns?? In that case all of mine have problems!

    While I agree with the sentiment of the rest of your post I really struggle when this is the only indicator.

  12. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Sonja For This Useful Post:

    HappyBovinexx  (08-10-2015),harvs  (08-10-2015),SAgirl  (08-10-2015)

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    1,833
    Thanks
    915
    Thanked
    1,419
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    No I didn't mean it like that I meant that if he's having a few melt downs and they have addressed it with her.
    Then maybe she should have a chat with them and find out what's going on.
    She also said that they are blaming him or it seems like they think it's his fault he got bitten.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    1,833
    Thanks
    915
    Thanked
    1,419
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    A few melt downs a day is really not normal behaviour and may mean there is an issue

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    4,094
    Thanks
    1,386
    Thanked
    1,357
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Reneeharry View Post
    A few melt downs a day is really not normal behaviour and may mean there is an issue
    See I am not sure why a few meltdowns every now and the. Wouldn't be 'normal' every single parenting article I have read says it's still normal to have meltdowns now and then. Not to mention, my DS has been late developing these 'traits'. He had no terrible twos at all. His behaviour only changed when his little brother was born. That's what I keep saying over and over. With us changing things about our life (DH and I trying harder not to argue and getting back on track (trying) and also changing the way we react to certain behaviours etc, taking a more gentle approach with ds has worked wonders.


 

Similar Threads

  1. Year 5 Issue
    By PomPoms in forum Preschools and Schools
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 22-05-2015, 09:36
  2. Sleep issue, again....
    By heartstringz in forum General Sleeping & Settling Chat
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 18-02-2015, 19:09

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Fridge-To-Go Australasia
Xmas with a NEW Fridge-to-go Lunch Bag! Fridge-To-Go Australasia
Fridge-to-go 8 hour cooler bags are ideal under the Christmas tree! Now in modern lunch bag designs - fill them with toys and chocolate to make parents and kids happy! Stay super cool and eat healthy and fresh food all summer long!
sales & new stuffsee all
True Fairies
True Fairies is the first interactive website where children can engage and speak with a real fairy through the unique webcam fairy portal. Each session is tailored to the child, and is filled with enchantment and magic.
Visit website to find out more!
featured supporter
GymbaROO
GymbaROO offers activities for babies & toddlers in a fun learning centre, focussing on developmental education. Classes are available Australia-wide. Enrol today & help your child to reach their full potential. Visit the website to find out more.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!