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  1. #91
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    There are many things parents can do to help children overcome their challenges. But it's also important to make sure you support your child and guiding them. Like your kid’s special quirks, celebrate small successes, and stop comparing your child to others. Feeling unconditionally loved and believed will help your child more than anything else.

  2. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by DT75 View Post
    Is the psych going to speak to the centre on your behalf? I get the feeling they won't "listen" if you tell them the psych said he is just fine.
    At this stage, I don't think so. She suggested we are proactive and call a meeting with her to basically say 'we hear you, we feel we don't agree with xyz, because of the following reasons, and we are happy to accept any help you have offered' - in the letter she has said they are getting someone to work one on one with DS at daycare and out psych said that she feels it's OTT but it would be beneficial for him and it won't hurt to accept it.

    If the centre leader doesn't believe us etc then I'll get out psych to write a letter.

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    DT75  (15-10-2015)

  4. #93
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    You have great support from the psych and some great advice.

    I hope your DS has better experiences at childcare.

    I also hope you are a little less stressed too. You are doing great.

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    SAgirl  (15-10-2015)

  6. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    I don't see carers writing a letter with observations about a child as a bad or inappropriate thing. Infact I think it's a good thing. As long as they are not saying they have a medical degree when they don't.

    As for whether the carers are picking on the OP's DS that's a hard thing to determine due to pre-existing complexities with the OPs DS as well as sensitivities and potential bias/misunderstanding on both sides.
    I don't either. Wording it as a "diagnosis" is where the problem lies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    I don't see carers writing a letter with observations about a child as a bad or inappropriate thing. Infact I think it's a good thing. As long as they are not saying they have a medical degree when they don't.

    As for whether the carers are picking on the OP's DS that's a hard thing to determine due to pre-existing complexities with the OPs DS as well as sensitivities and potential bias/misunderstanding on both sides.
    I agree, I am a teacher & written observations are a part of my job,particulary when workint with 0-5's. It is definitely about wording though - I would never presume to make a diagnosis, but I would record my observations exactly as I saw them.
    Eg - 'John was carrying a cup of water & he tripped,dropping the cup. John screamed, and ran to the corner of the room. He sat in the corner,covering his ears and rocking back and forth whilst crying. His gaze was fixed on the patch of water on the floor'

    As opposed to - "I think John has ASD because he gets overwhelmed with situations such as spilled water".

    The first one is an observation I have previously written to give with a checklist etc for a psych. It is important to write info 'as observed', & leave the interpretation up to the person who is qualified to do so.

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    DT75  (15-10-2015),Frankenmum  (15-10-2015),gingermillie  (15-10-2015),Jenga  (16-10-2015),just her chameleon  (15-10-2015),Wise Enough  (15-10-2015)

  9. #96
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    Default Another daycare issue

    Quote Originally Posted by DT75 View Post
    I don't either. Wording it as a "diagnosis" is where the problem lies.
    I would need to see the exact wording of the email to ascertain if the carer was being irresponsible.

    There's a world of difference between "I diagnose your kid has ASD" and "this could mean a possible diagnosis of ASD. Blah blah blah. I hope your MEDICAL professional is able to use the information I have provided. Signed your daycare educator." Maybe the word diagnosis wasn't specifically mentioned. Who knows.

    Perhaps I've missed something however I haven't seen or heard anything specific to date which suggests to me the carer has been out of line.

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    Does she use the word ASD in her letter?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Enough View Post
    Does she use the word ASD in her letter?
    In what context?

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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    In what context?
    When the carer wrote the letter is autism mentioned anywhere? It doesn't need context. As a previous poster said you can state the facts without making a diagnosis.

    I'm curious if she actually did suggest ASD.

  13. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Enough View Post
    When the carer wrote the letter is autism mentioned anywhere? It doesn't need context. As a previous poster said you can state the facts without making a diagnosis.

    I'm curious if she actually did suggest ASD.
    I thought the carer mentioned ASD and that he should be assessed in person and then SAgirl asked them to put their concerns in writing?


 

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