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  1. #1
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    Default Child care cutting hours

    Has anyone been in the situation where the centre their child is attending has decided to cut the hours your child attends and dictates what hours they are able to be there?

    My son (he's 3.5) has only been at the centre since July. They have had some behavioural issues with him, which I thought we were all working together to get past. We have been cooperating with the centre-attending meetings, taken him for a speech assessment and also have booked to see a paediatrician for an assessment (but the wait list is long). We have also been implementing strategies suggested by the centre staff so we are all on the same page.

    They recently asked for our permission for inclusive services to come and assess at the centre to see if they would be eligible for funding to have hours for an extra support person to be around. They got approved for temporary funding of 15 hours a week. Things seemed to be going well and we were being told he was having good days.

    Last Wednesday they asked me to come in for a meeting which I was told was just to discuss the funding etc. However I was told that they feel they cannot support my son at the centre for anymore than the funding hours which would mean 3 days a week for 5 hours a day, and they would like it to be from 9am-2pm. And they wanted this to start Monday.

    My husband and I both work full time. Me on a rotating roster which I don't get any say in. My husband works for himself so a bit more flexibility but as the business is only new he needs to spend a lot of hours on it to build up customer base.

    Childcare isn't easy to find here and everywhere I have rung so far is full. I don't know whether moving him will do more harm than good, or whether I should get him out of the centre that seems to be labelling him without any type of diagnosis.

    Quite a few people have told me they aren't allowed to do this, but I rang another centre trying to find a place for him and they asked why I was moving him so I told them the whole story and they said 'oh yes we have had to do that before' and suddenly she decided that they wouldn't be able to support him at their centre either.

    I'm between a rock and a hard place. I only returned to work in the middle of this year because are finances are tight, so cutting back work or staying home isn't an option right now (I wish it was).

    He really is a lovely kid. I don't feel his behaviours are so bad they warrant all of this. I feel that though he may have some speech delays, that perhaps he is just struggling to adjust to being in care as prior to this he has been home with me.

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    jac7  (23-09-2015)

  3. #2
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    What sort of behaviours is he displaying that they cannot handle?

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    I'm sorry to hear this. I agree - behavioral issues wouldn't require so much support. I would suggest you see your maternal health nurse. They have amazing advice, resources and supports. Has he had his 3.5 year check yet? They get a great insight in that 3.5 year assessment. I think you need to put the pressure on them to keep him in care. Are they are council run centre? Could you speak to the council directly?

    You sound like you're doing all you can. They need to step up and assist you more. All the best!

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    Albert01  (23-09-2015)

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    I have a little experience with this, though my DS attends a preschool (in NSW).

    My DS does 1 day a week at preschool. He has an ASD diagnosis, so the preschool has some funding for a support person for DS. The funding only allows the support person to be there for 4 hours. Therefore in the beginning, they would not have him for full days.

    He is now there from 9am-2pm (preschool hours are 9am-3pm) because he has coped well enough not to have his support person with him the whole time. She's mainly needed for the middle part of the day when there's more structured group time activities.

    I assume they are within their rights to only offer X amount of hours to children with additional needs. My preschool told me outright last year that if DS didn't have a diagnosis, they wouldn't be able to take him because they had to be able to apply for the funding. They are a not for profit preschool and they are grossly underfunded, but they are wonderful with DS.

    I'm sorry you are going through this, and I hope someone else can shed some more light on this for you

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mamasupial View Post
    What sort of behaviours is he displaying that they cannot handle?
    There was some biting and hitting to begin with, but that seemed to settle after he settled in. More socialising stuff now-not sharing, not wanting to participate in group activities, getting upset when asked to sit for circle time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by moosey View Post
    I'm sorry to hear this. I agree - behavioral issues wouldn't require so much support. I would suggest you see your maternal health nurse. They have amazing advice, resources and supports. Has he had his 3.5 year check yet? They get a great insight in that 3.5 year assessment. I think you need to put the pressure on them to keep him in care. Are they are council run centre? Could you speak to the council directly?

    You sound like you're doing all you can. They need to step up and assist you more. All the best!
    I didn't know there was a 3.5 year check. Maybe I missed it. I know he has one at 4 because that's the next lot of immunisations. We have always gone to our GP for the health checks though.

    It's a private centre, not council run. But someone has advised me of the government department to contact if I have concerns.

    I have found a free program aimed at under 12s if you get a mental health plan for them so might give that a go too

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    Gosh. What a tough situation. It's good on one hand that they are being honest with you by saying that they can't support your son outside those funded hours. ..but on the other it impacts you all and makes childcare very difficult.
    My daughter has several issues (behaviour/speech/global delays) and so far our centre has been pretty good. They get a lot of funding for her. To the point that they have someone extra in the room for all her hours.
    I would suggest the centre appeal the amount of hours they are getting with inclusion support and you get letters from the speech and perhaps a psych and paediatrician stating how and why the extra support is needed. We did this and it worked in our favour.
    Unfortunately they can say they can't support him. There are centres I've been to that even said they wouldn't apply for inclusion support.
    I'm sorry you're dealing with this. I'm currently trying to get our centre more on board with our behaviour specialist - in terms of visual diaries etc. They've had a change of director so the leadership isn't as good. And that's stressful enough.
    I hope you can get some answers and it resolves for you.

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    Have you considered community kindergartens rather than long day care especially the non fir profit centers like lady Gowrie only reason being from my experience they seem to have more time for individual kids needs. Only problem being they run school hours so might be hard for you as may mean some sort of family day care after he finishes kindy. My DD moved to a lady Gowrie centre this year and its the best decision we made for her we all love it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by summastarlet View Post
    There was some biting and hitting to begin with, but that seemed to settle after he settled in. More socialising stuff now-not sharing, not wanting to participate in group activities, getting upset when asked to sit for circle time.
    And what have they done to help with these behaviours?
    With the support person in place for the majority of day. ..and implementing strategies to deal with these they might actually find that he's fine when the support isn't there. If they work with helping him during the funded hours.
    Eg. Visual diaries. Taking turns. Using social stories. Buddying him up with a friend to take turns on games maybe using an ipad or something.
    Some of these strategies could help ease the anxiety which may be causing he behaviour.

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    I'm suspecting that your son is taking significant time from the carers and without a diagnosis they don't have the staff to adequately provide care to the whole room.

    I totally get why you are worried since you work FT. You say he hasn't been there long, where was he before? Is that an option?


 

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