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  1. #1
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    Default Feeding difficulties & large tonsils

    My daughter is a 25w twin preemie, now 19 months corrected. She's been struggling with solids all along, but improved heaps since doing an SOS feeding therapy 4 months ago and putting her on rice milk. She's been vomitting a lot, gagging and had a very sensitive gagging reflex in the past. Most of these sympoms have gone away, but she still can't move on to table food . She did well with soft meltables like puffs, cheese and bacon balls, cheerios. Can eat deli meats, soft cheese, mashed banana, most home made fruit purees, soup with soft noodles... But when it comes to bread or any other solid food, she either doesn't eat much of it or doesn't want to try.

    Her savoury dishes are still baby purees. When it comes to bread and soft cakes, she will have a bit, but not enough for a meal. So it is not that she can't chew or doesn't like it, but for some reason won't eat much of it. I also find that if she really wants it and I suppose tries hard, she'll have a bit, but other times nothing at all. We are nowhere near for her to have pasta, mashed potatoes, hot potatoe chips or any other similar size or texture food.


    She's had a barium swallow test done and the paediatrician checked her tonsils and they are very large. She's waiting for an ENT specialist appointment to see if they need to come out, so her feeding can improve.
    It does seam to me that the large tonsils could be the reason for not being able to make the next step and be able to eat table food.


    She doesn't have SPD or autism...

    Does anyone have similar experience? Has your LO had large tonsils and struglled with table food? Did the feeding improved once the tonsils were out? Was he/she able to move on to table food and how soon?

  2. #2
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    Hi. I have a daughter who had been through SOS feeding therapy. She's three in November and has a lot of feeding difficulties. (Relatedto her syndrome. She drinks pediasure to supplement her diet)
    In fact. ..very similar. ..she struggles with food that is more difficult to chew and swallow. It's because she has low muscle tone and gets tired chewing those types of food.
    What did the feeding therapists say about her tongue lateralisation and chewing? If she is tasting and having little bits of those textures then just keep on with it. She may need time to develop stronger muscles and jaw strength to handle them.
    Do you still do feeding therapy?


    ETA.. we are waiting on ENT to discuss her tonsil removal too.

  3. #3
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    Hi tamtam,

    We've stopped the therapy because my lo was doing so well, i figured ill continue it myself. She doesnt have low muscle tone as far as i know and the speechy never expresssed any concerns. When she wants or feels like having bread/toast she'll eat it reasonably quick. What she tends to do mosf of times is chew on toast, wet a piece mske it in a ball like she is suppose to but then spits it out.

    How do you recognise low muscle tone? My lo is very acive otherwise, was walking at 11 months corrected and doesnt seam to have any issues with motor skills...

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    My DD had very large tonsils - almost touching - chronically since she was young (under 1). She had around 3-4 bouts of tonsillitis by the time she was 2.5-3 and around her 3rd birthday the ENT recommended taking them out. Her eating was very picky.
    So she had her tonsils and adenoids out a month after she turned 3. I was hesitant to go ahead with the operation but 2 GP's and the ENT recommended it. I had been reading about eliminating dairy to reduce inflammation of the tonsils but she was dairy intolerant as a baby so was bought up on Rice milk. The only dairy she had was a bit of cheese and custard or icecream. In the end I went with the medical advice and she had the op.
    I can honestly say I don't think her eating improved very much, if at all. At first she did eat a piece of chicken for the first time so I thought perhaps it had but nearly 2 years on she is still very fussy and scared to try any new foods and pretty much wont eat meat unless its chicken nuggets or sausage from a hot dog. She never had trouble with pasta so she sill eats that (only with grated cheese on top - nothing else) but she does now eat sandwiches. I can't say whether thats because her tonsils are gone or she just decided to try them. Again she is fussy and only has vegemite or cheese.
    Her voice changed and became higher pitched and less "muffled". She also stopped snoring at night so I guess from that point of view it was worth it.
    My ENT said the operation would help her eat better so perhaps in others it does. Just be aware that fussy eating may remain afterwards but having tonsils almost blocking the airway can't be comfortable so again from that point of view it is worth it.
    Does your DD have any dairy at all? If you are hesitant perhaps try eliminating ALL dairy (including in biscuits, cake, etc) for at least 3 months to see if she improves. 19 months is very young to have the operation, and its considered quite a major operation at that age as there is high risk of bleeding as the arteries lie quite close to the throat at this age. Don't mean to scare you, its just something to be aware of and discuss with your ENT.

    All the best with it.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Redcorset For This Useful Post:

    lena78  (15-09-2015)

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    My daughter does that too. Balls it up in her mouth and spits it out. Especially loves to do it with broccoli.
    Low muscle tone is a funny thing. You can still be quite strong (my little one is) and in target with motor skills. But just get tired easily. Though it really depends on each child too.
    Maybe she doesn't like those textures? Perhaps it is the tonsils making it harder to swallow.
    I have a friend who saw a marked improvement in eating after the tonsils were removed.

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    Hi Redcorset, my pediatrician said that my LO's tonsils aren't quite touching, but they are very large. You did scare me a bit with an op. I will have a big chat with a pediatrician and the specialist if it comes down to getting them out.

    Both my children go to childcare 3x per week. My daughter can’t eat most foods there, so I used to give her baby food with her to eat. A month ago we decided to stop the pouches to encourage her to eat, so she now mainly eats bread and fruit. I pick her up at 1pm to give her another 3 meals at home. This means that I still can’t move on and work even full days let alone full time.


    I’d like for her to at least be able to eat bread/soft cakes/fruit, so I wouldn’t have to stop work and pick her up from childcare to feed her. I’m at a point where I don’t care if she’ll be fussy for a while as long as we can start functioning as an average family and she can fit into childcare a bit better. I’d love for her to at least be able to eat bakery stuff on the go and in childcare, so we can spend more time outdoor/visiting/travelling. She is a 3 percentile baby, so skipping meals is not an option for now….
    She has intolerance to milk protein, which I figured out at about 13 months corrected. She’s been on rice milk since, but has custard and yogurt ( mainly to keep up the calories).
    Tamtam, I’m not sure if it’s a texture issue with the foods. A lot of the stuff she hasn’t tried yet, but she now seams to like all food groups, hot/cold, crunchy/soft etc….

    I wish she could talk to tell me what’s the problem :-)

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    Ds2 has been on the wait list since june last year waiting for his tonsils to come out. He has huge tonsils normally and gets tonsilitis 6 to 8 times a year. It is often difficult for him to swallow certain foods when he doesn't have tonsilitis as his tonsils are big. When he has tonsilitis he eats much less, we often have to mash his food so he will eat. Be glad when they are out. He is 4.
    Sounds to me it is the tonsils op that is interupting your little ones feeding.
    Last edited by Blessedwith3boys; 15-09-2015 at 15:41.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blessedwith3boys View Post
    Ds2 has been on the wait list since june last year waiting for his tonsils to come out. He has huge tonsils normally and gets tonsilitis 6 to 8 times a year. It is often difficult for him to swallow certain foods when he doesn't have tonsilitis as his tonsils are big. When he has tonsilitis he eats much less, we often have to mash his food so he will eat. Be glad when they are out. He is 4.
    Sounds to me it is the tonsils op that is interupting your little ones feeding.
    Off topic.... but could you go privately to get it done? We're waiting on appointment with ENT at public hospital. ...but I'll be pushing to go private if we can. We just have issues with DD's medical condition and anesthesia/she's high risk.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by lena78 View Post
    Hi Redcorset, my pediatrician said that my LO's tonsils aren't quite touching, but they are very large. You did scare me a bit with an op. I will have a big chat with a pediatrician and the specialist if it comes down to getting them out.

    Both my children go to childcare 3x per week. My daughter can’t eat most foods there, so I used to give her baby food with her to eat. A month ago we decided to stop the pouches to encourage her to eat, so she now mainly eats bread and fruit. I pick her up at 1pm to give her another 3 meals at home. This means that I still can’t move on and work even full days let alone full time.


    I’d like for her to at least be able to eat bread/soft cakes/fruit, so I wouldn’t have to stop work and pick her up from childcare to feed her. I’m at a point where I don’t care if she’ll be fussy for a while as long as we can start functioning as an average family and she can fit into childcare a bit better. I’d love for her to at least be able to eat bakery stuff on the go and in childcare, so we can spend more time outdoor/visiting/travelling. She is a 3 percentile baby, so skipping meals is not an option for now….
    She has intolerance to milk protein, which I figured out at about 13 months corrected. She’s been on rice milk since, but has custard and yogurt ( mainly to keep up the calories).
    Tamtam, I’m not sure if it’s a texture issue with the foods. A lot of the stuff she hasn’t tried yet, but she now seams to like all food groups, hot/cold, crunchy/soft etc….

    I wish she could talk to tell me what’s the problem :-)
    My daughter goes to daycare. She hardly eats anything. Can you pack her lunch though? And they just give her that? My daughter was also cmpi but tolerated yogurt and cheeses quite well from about 12 months onwards.
    I hope you get some real answers soon. Feeding issues are so stressful. A daily constant source of worry and frustration. Hugs.

  11. #10
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    Dd had hers out very young I think 16 months? She seriously had about 12 rounds antibiotics. Didn't touch food etc now she eats so much!! Maybe fussy but heaps

    DS who has delayed chewing they are calling it Now :/ is booked in for October. I've given up waiting for our barium test as you go on wait list for who is important. His are large and I will just book him in. He eats MILK. KFC and arrow root biscuits 😱


 

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