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  1. #11
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    Just from memory, I think it's girls who do better in single sex schools and boys do better in co-ed. Or it could be other way around?

    I went to an all girls school from year 5 - year 8 and hated it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    Just from memory, I think it's girls who do better in single sex schools and boys do better in co-ed. Or it could be other way around?

    I went to an all girls school from year 5 - year 8 and hated it.
    I went for 2 terms to a single sex and basically got expelled.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elijahs Mum View Post
    May I ask why ?
    Two reasons - in short, as PP said, life is coed and kids need to learn to work with both genders. They hear opinions and point of view from the other sex and complement each other in the classroom.

    Secondly, kids in single sex schools tend to get silly about the other gender. It can be harmless "ooooh look a boooooy!" type thing, but I think that it can also result in a real lack of respect for the opposite sex, and as a mother of boys the 'rugby, rowing and rooting' focus that some boys' schools have terrifies and appalls me.

    Hope this makes sense, I'm watching The Bachelor at the same time as responding. (how ironic!)

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  6. #14
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    I am seriously considering an all girls school for DD.

    But she prefers girls anyway and would respond very well to an all girls environment.

    She does have exposure to boys with cousins and stuff so I am not so much worried about the socialisation (and to be honest, 5 or 6 years where she is pretty much in an all girl environment going through puberty is probably better for her. Its not like that will last forever)...

    and I do think that girls and boys learn differently, so having her at an all girls school where the learning is tailored towards the way girls approach things and learn will be better for her.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BettyW View Post

    Secondly, kids in single sex schools tend to get silly about the other gender. It can be harmless "ooooh look a boooooy!" type thing, but I think that it can also result in a real lack of respect for the opposite sex, and as a mother of boys the 'rugby, rowing and rooting' focus that some boys' schools have terrifies and appalls me.
    I remember watching a documentary series years ago that followed two single sex schools (they were brother/sister schools) and the carry on about the other sex when they did get together for activities was very silly, and really eye opening.

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    I'm entirely opposed to same sex schools, largely for the reasons already given.
    There's as much variation in learning styles between individual boys or girls as there is between the sexes. Plus as far as I know (thinking back to undergrad psych) there's not a huge deal of evidence to support that boys and girls have hugely different learning styles anyway.
    There is evidence that girls are more likely to speak up when at an all girls school rather than a coed, but I think sending them to an all girls school is only treating a symptom rather than the cause - we need greater social change so that girls don't (subconsciously?) feel they need to be passive around boys in the first place.

    On a more anecdotal note, I believe 13 years at an all male private school seriously stunted my DH's emotional development which took a long time to overcome. (He was all "hurr feelings are dumb and for girls lets just punch each other")

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    Another thing to consider is that single sex schools reinforce the 'gender is completely binary' mindset. If you're a gay male or have any kind of trans leanings an all boys' school will be a difficult place to be. It's very common for more 'effeminate' boys at my school to hang out with girls only - they would struggle bigtime at an all boys' school.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BH-KatiesMum View Post
    I am seriously considering an all girls school for DD.

    But she prefers girls anyway and would respond very well to an all girls environment.

    She does have exposure to boys with cousins and stuff so I am not so much worried about the socialisation (and to be honest, 5 or 6 years where she is pretty much in an all girl environment going through puberty is probably better for her. Its not like that will last forever)...

    and I do think that girls and boys learn differently, so having her at an all girls school where the learning is tailored towards the way girls approach things and learn will be better for her.
    This is what I was thinking as well - I suppose I've never thought it was a negative as I went to an all girls school for 12 years and loved it, went straight into a male dominated workforce and have never had any problems socialising ( we did have tons of male friends and interactions through friends, cousins and my brother )

    we've got DS booked into an all boys school next year ( where my brother went) he's got 6 female cousins so he definitely won't lack in female company!

    I've recently had a few negative comments from people when we tell them , hence the topic , granted they usually have not had experience with single sex schools so I suppose I didn't realise it was such a big deal , school is so stressful and he hasn't even started yet!😯

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elijahs Mum View Post
    This is what I was thinking as well - I suppose I've never thought it was a negative as I went to an all girls school for 12 years and loved it, went straight into a male dominated workforce and have never had any problems socialising ( we did have tons of male friends and interactions through friends, cousins and my brother )

    we've got DS booked into an all boys school next year ( where my brother went) he's got 6 female cousins so he definitely won't lack in female company!

    I've recently had a few negative comments from people when we tell them , hence the topic , granted they usually have not had experience with single sex schools so I suppose I didn't realise it was such a big deal , school is so stressful and he hasn't even started yet!������
    At the end of the day you need to send your child where you are comfortable sending them. Everyone has a different opinion on schooling, but I find it's a bit like childbirth....once you've had a baby people stop telling you how you should give birth...with school, once your child starts, people tend to keep their opinions to themselves.

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    I'm not a huge fan of single sex schools due to the socialisation issue. Although I did like my girls 7-10 school, I chose to do 11-12 in a public high school. Whenever I caught up with my friends who had gone into the follow-on co-ed 11 and 12 school (the 2 single sex schools combined), they were completely silly about boys. OMG he LOOKED at me!!! *giggles*, he LIKES you *giggles*, OMG he sat NEXT to me on the bus *giggles*. It was freaking ridiculous lol.
    Compared to the school I was then at, who had been together boys and girls since year 7, there was none of that, they all just treated each other nicely and normally, boys and girls the same. There was none of the silliness. The difference was incredible between the 2 groups. I wouldn't want my kids dealing with that nonsense while trying to concentrate on the HSC, so that's the main reason I don't like single sex schools for my kids.


 

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