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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kaybaby View Post
    A bit off topic, but both my sons suffer(ed) with night terros nightly for a long time, and they still pop up ocasionally... it was awful I'm not sure if you have tried it, but waking them about half an hour before the usual time of them waking in terror worked amazingly for us. Just enough to stir them and break the sleep cycle and the night terror was "skipped". Night terros usually occur at the same point in a sleep cycle, so can often be predicted. Anyway, just thought i would share, in case it was helpful to anyone
    This worked for us - a dr at PMH suggested to wake DS an hour after he went to sleep for 3 nights. We haven't had one since (fingers crossed).

  2. #22
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    Default New study finds genetics is what decides how well your baby sleeps.

    Both my boys were great sleepers. Were sleeping through 99% of the time from 8 months. Prior to that waking once for a breastfeed but straight back to sleep. As very little babies waking more frequently as is normal but straight back to sleep after a feed. I did co-sleep with my first but not my second. Both are also great nappers during the day. I'm hoping number 3 will be the same

  3. #23
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    I believe genetics has a lot to do with sleep as well.

    For those with terrible sleepers- my worst sleeper is now 12.5yo. He still takes a couple of hours to fall asleep, but the good news is that now that he is older he copes with this independently; ie it's not always going to stress *you* out! He lies in bed and reads for a couple of hours, he doesn't bother anyone or keep anyone else awake. Once he's asleep he sleeps really well now, and as far as I know, if he wakes in the night he falls quickly back to sleep.
    My DS2 is 8yo, he still wakes overnight once, usually at 1am. He has always needed me for reassurance. The good thing is that now, he has figured out a way of climbing into my bed without disturbing me (I was awake one night when he did it, it's very cute lol, and considerate), so even though he still needs me, I actually don't wake up and never even know he's there until the morning when I see him!

    Basically I just wanted to reassure you all that even if you do have a long term bad sleeper, it's not always going to impact the whole household as it does when they're babies.

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  5. #24
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    Interesting article.

    Maybe I am not understanding the research methodology and how the control groups are defined (there doesn't seen to be a great deal of plain English explanation in the article) - I am more than happy to be corrected if that is the case.
    - I would be interested in any studies that have more check-in points with families. Catch up's at 6 months and then 18 months don't seem frequent enough to me? How can control and the hundreds of environmental factors be accurately recorded with intervals that far apart? By 6 months, after bub has come out of the other side of the 4 month sleep regression, the writing is already on the wall in terms of many factors (environmental/habit etc). By 18 months it's almost at the point of no return in terms of entrenched habit.

    I am still a believer that in most cases (where a child doesn't have medical issues) it's entirely within the realm of possibility for parental actions to improve a babies sleep habits.

    I will stay tuned for further scientific studies on the topic - never knock back a study unless it's on some dodgy biased site such as www.parenting:mywayorthehighway.com or www.tizziehallsucksdogsnads.com

  6. #25
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    Completely agree genetics has something to do with it. DS1 was difficult to settle from day 1 and DS2 slept 5 hours straight at night as a newborn and has always just put himself to sleep from the first day. Such opposite experience with same parenting style - I really think it's the baby that has a lot to do with it.

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    Interesting article.

    Maybe I am not understanding the research methodology and how the control groups are defined (there doesn't seen to be a great deal of plain English explanation in the article) - I am more than happy to be corrected if that is the case.
    - I would be interested in any studies that have more check-in points with families. Catch up's at 6 months and then 18 months don't seem frequent enough to me? How can control and the hundreds of environmental factors be accurately recorded with intervals that far apart? By 6 months, after bub has come out of the other side of the 4 month sleep regression, the writing is already on the wall in terms of many factors (environmental/habit etc). By 18 months it's almost at the point of no return in terms of entrenched habit.

    I am still a believer that in most cases (where a child doesn't have medical issues) it's entirely within the realm of possibility for parental actions to improve a babies sleep habits.

    I will stay tuned for further scientific studies on the topic - never knock back a study unless it's on some dodgy biased site such as www.parenting:mywayorthehighway.com or www.tizziehallsucksdogsnads.com
    Sigh. You can be such a frustrating person.

    Btw my kids have never ever been sleep trained. And I've fed, cuddled, patted, bedshared etc my way thru their baby and toddler years. Yes I have 2 kids aged 3&5 that are fantastic sleepers now. They go to bed, stay asleep in their beds 80-90% of the time, nap 1.5-3hrs with no dramas.

    So your theory of "entrenchment of habits" is just crap.

    You know why? Because I do believe what @Sonja said in the beginning. 15% of kids are great sleepers, 15% are crap and the rest can achieve better sleep with various methods.

    Congrats on once again ruining a thread where people can share their stories of kids that don't sleep so perfectly as yours.



    wifey of hubby who is always away. mother of two girls who are always amusing.

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  9. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    Interesting article.

    Maybe I am not understanding the research methodology and how the control groups are defined (there doesn't seen to be a great deal of plain English explanation in the article) - I am more than happy to be corrected if that is the case.
    - I would be interested in any studies that have more check-in points with families. Catch up's at 6 months and then 18 months don't seem frequent enough to me? How can control and the hundreds of environmental factors be accurately recorded with intervals that far apart? By 6 months, after bub has come out of the other side of the 4 month sleep regression, the writing is already on the wall in terms of many factors (environmental/habit etc). By 18 months it's almost at the point of no return in terms of entrenched habit.

    I am still a believer that in most cases (where a child doesn't have medical issues) it's entirely within the realm of possibility for parental actions to improve a babies sleep habits.

    I will stay tuned for further scientific studies on the topic - never knock back a study unless it's on some dodgy biased site such as www.parenting:mywayorthehighway.com or www.tizziehallsucksdogsnads.com
    Seriously! Can't you just be supportive rather than try to insinuate those with poor sleepers are just bad parents.

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  11. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by DesperatelySeekingSleep View Post
    Seriously! Can't you just be supportive rather than try to insinuate those with poor sleepers are just bad parents.
    Thank you.

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  13. #29
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    I was a shocking sleeper. Really, really awful. So its no surprise that both of my two did not find sleep easy to find.

    One is very alert and struggles to go to sleep, and always has, but once asleep she now sleeps well. The other is 5 and has never slept through a night in his life but I no longer care - I was like that and its just how we're wired and I've reached a point where I'm okay with it.

    Its much less stressful to go with the flow.

  14. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rose&Aurelia View Post
    Sigh. You can be such a frustrating person.

    Btw my kids have never ever been sleep trained. And I've fed, cuddled, patted, bedshared etc my way thru their baby and toddler years. Yes I have 2 kids aged 3&5 that are fantastic sleepers now. They go to bed, stay asleep in their beds 80-90% of the time, nap 1.5-3hrs with no dramas.

    So your theory of "entrenchment of habits" is just crap.

    You know why? Because I do believe what @Sonja said in the beginning. 15% of kids are great sleepers, 15% are crap and the rest can achieve better sleep with various methods.

    Congrats on once again ruining a thread where people can share their stories of kids that don't sleep so perfectly as yours.



    wifey of hubby who is always away. mother of two girls who are always amusing.
    Thank you. Well said.


 

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