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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MillieMollyMandy View Post
    I think it's a great career and since having DD it's a career I'm very grateful to have. Yes, it's hard work but what job isn't? I certainly have never been up until midnight every night and have most of my holidays to myself, I will do some work here and there but not too much. My DH is currently a teacher in a senior role and on average is at school from 8.15-4.30 daily then spends another 1-2 hrs working at home once DD is in bed. Weekends and holidays he would average 1-2 hrs per day.
    Some aspects may not fit with family life eg. You have holidays but it is difficult to take time off during the term if your kids are sick, have appointments etc. You will probably need to look at before or after school care for your kids because you will start earlier and finish later than they do.
    Ive been so lucky to return to work 2 days per week since having DD, I still love teaching after 12 years!
    So don't listen to all the grumps, enjoy your study and get the most out of it.
    Thank you it's nice to receive a positive response 😊.
    I do realise not all school holidays are 'holidays' as such, but even sitting at home marking/prepping is better than no time off at all. In my current job, I work 4 days a week (ok so I am doing 5 days work in 4 days, just so I can get one day off with DS, although now that's uni day!). However I only get 16 days leave a year. That's essentially 3 weeks in total. And we always try to have 2 weeks at Christmas to visit family interstate, so that other 4 days has to last me the other 11 months of the year...
    And I too find it hard to get time off when DS is sick or has an appointment (still trying to organise a day to get his overdue vax done, it's really hard to negotiate).
    As for after school care, I would have to do this on my current job so it's not any different. I find the corporate world very unkind to mothers in general (I know there are exceptions, but I don't live in an area where there are a lot of options either). I don't get (and never have got) paid maternity leave from my work, only government PPL. And contrary to what some might think, corporate work doesn't necessarily = good pay. I have had a pay rise that equates to $7.50 a week in the past 3 years. In total. It's not even 0.05%. And this was after receiving a top review etc - they thought this was rewarding me! My salary has only risen by about $10K in 10 years. And now my teacher friends earn more than me (whereas I had started on more than them). So pay wise, I am not too bothered.

    The thought of having to put my kids in care every school holidays is really horrible. I'd much rather have time off with them on hols, and do whatever I have to do during term etc.

    But of course I am not doing this only because of holidays etc. It's more about finding something I can be passionate about again, so work doesn't feel like such a chore, if I am enjoying it , it shouldn't be so bad.

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  3. #12
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    I'm half way through a primary degree, and speaking to other teachers in prac etc, it seems the first couple of years are the most chaotic. These are the times supervision is highest, you are still putting together units of work from scratch, you are still finding your feet in the profession. As you get more experience you build a good bank of lesson plans and units you can re-use or re-jig, you learn the short cuts.

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  5. #13
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    I think a lot will depend on the school you find yourself at as well. My old school was so laissez faire with everything- the prin flitted in and out as he pleased and all planning and marking was left up to me. He rarely looked over my planner. To be blunt- it was heaven.
    My SIL works in a very rigid and structured school and she has to turn her planner in with it filled out in minute detail 2 weeks in advanced to be gone over with a fine tooth comb, and if it's not up to scratch she has to answer to the principal. I find this absurd for a number of reasons, the most being that if the majority of students have trouble understanding a concept and more time needs to be spent on it, then she has already filled up her next two weeks without any room to wiggle. Teaching just doesn't work like that. Unfortunately this is the school my boys go to and the school where I am hoping to be employed next year if all things go to plan so I will either go insane with the pressure or find ways of dealing with it. But I digress.
    Teaching is a fabulous job for you if you find you have a natural rapport with kids, if you love to continually investigate and explore and learn new things, and it DOES work well with a family. (Honestly- that lecturer must be so cynical about the whole world. What better job is there for a mother or father?!)
    Good luck with your studies!

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  7. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mod-Nomsie View Post
    I think a lot will depend on the school you find yourself at as well. My old school was so laissez faire with everything- the prin flitted in and out as he pleased and all planning and marking was left up to me. He rarely looked over my planner. To be blunt- it was heaven.
    My SIL works in a very rigid and structured school and she has to turn her planner in with it filled out in minute detail 2 weeks in advanced to be gone over with a fine tooth comb, and if it's not up to scratch she has to answer to the principal. I find this absurd for a number of reasons, the most being that if the majority of students have trouble understanding a concept and more time needs to be spent on it, then she has already filled up her next two weeks without any room to wiggle. Teaching just doesn't work like that. Unfortunately this is the school my boys go to and the school where I am hoping to be employed next year if all things go to plan so I will either go insane with the pressure or find ways of dealing with it. But I digress.
    Teaching is a fabulous job for you if you find you have a natural rapport with kids, if you love to continually investigate and explore and learn new things, and it DOES work well with a family. (Honestly- that lecturer must be so cynical about the whole world. What better job is there for a mother or father?!)
    Good luck with your studies!
    I have 2 good friends that have taught for 15 years or so and this does seem to ring true. About 10 years ago both had such a bad teaching experience that they both left the profession to do 'regular' jobs. Within 6 months one had gone back to teach, the other within 2 years. They both now love their jobs and admit it was just the school (a rough one, tough kids etc).
    As for that tutor, I was a bit shocked too. I would never say that to someone training in my profession (I have also done tutoring at uni), or at least I would be very careful about how I worded it. I felt like she was telling me I am stupid. She did say she has 4 primary aged children though so maybe that's it - ANY job would be nigh impossible with 4 younger kids! I am planning on stopping at 2 (and will have nearly 5 year age gap between them).


 

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