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  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by HollyGolightly81 View Post
    Crazy. So if you have your baby privately and elect for a c/s, it's not covered by your insurance? It gobsmacks me how little Australian insurance covers.

    Eta: Actually, it shouldn't really surprise because UK private health funds do not offer any maternity cover at all, the only way to have maternity cover in the UK is to have international cover.

    I had both my babies privately and had elective c sections. My private health insurance covered the hospital stay and surgery. First time I had a small gap payment I had to pay for the anaesthetist (from memory about $100) and second time round I wasn't out of pocket at all. Private health didn't cover baby being checked over by the paediatrician though and we ended up with a bill to pay for that (some of which we got back from Medicare).

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    HollyGolightly81  (08-08-2015)

  3. #82
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    Default Tell me why I should or should not have an Epidural.

    ...

  4. #83
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    It's like any other anaesthetic for any other procedure in (a private) hospital. The anaesthetist will bill the patient separately and sometimes there will be a gap and sometimes the health fund will cover the whole cost. Depends on what the anaesthetist bills you.

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    I had an epi. It was bliss. I could still feel all the pushing stage and my DD was born less than an hour after it went in. No problems at all. Was up and walking shortly afterwards. They aren't always doom and gloom.

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    stupid question but you can opt for an epi when you go public right?

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    Quote Originally Posted by turquoisecoast View Post
    stupid question but you can opt for an epi when you go public right?
    Yes you can and it wouldn't cost you anything.

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    turquoisecoast  (08-08-2015)

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    Quote Originally Posted by meredithgrey View Post
    Well seeing as the public health system covers everything for free.........

    I get that...but surely you can understand why sometimes there are benefits to going private? Also, people choosing to go privately helps ensure that the public system isn't overburdened, something the UK really struggles with, so punishing people for freeing up a system that genuinely needs it is a bit ridiculous.

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  12. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by turquoisecoast View Post
    stupid question but you can opt for an epi when you go public right?
    You can have a epidural for free publicly but you're not guaranteed one. I have had several friends who wanted one but the dr was too busy so they missed out. I begged for one at my public birth after being told by a female anaethetist that I could have one before they induced me. By the time I went into labor she was off duty and the new dr at first was too busy for me and then when he finally came in he told me "we don't normally give epidural for things like this" (Ie giving birth to a stillborn that is not term). He was full of sh*t, I was allowed one. I had to give birth without it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by meredithgrey View Post
    The private health system is user pays. I would be double and triple checking everything to see what the insurance does and does not cover.

    Seeing as anaesthesia is charged/billed separately with any other procedure, I would imagine that epidural (whether during labour or for a caesarean) would be as well.

    I get that, but what insurance pays for varies quite a bit based on what a country's government system does and doesn't pay for. Australia has a pretty good mix of a great public system and overall a financially attainable private system but there are still some things that medicare and insurance do not cover (OB is one). The UK has a completely free public system that is incredibly overburdened and their private system is ridiculously expensive with British insurance not covering certain things at all, if they changed that they would help free up their public system. The government does have something to do with all of this, it's not just insurance agencies calling the shots.
    Last edited by HollyGolightly81; 08-08-2015 at 23:13.

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  15. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by meredithgrey View Post
    Unfortunately there is generally only one anaesthetic doctor on after hours and if they are in theatre with a patient having surgery, they can't come do an epidural until the surgery is finished.
    I understand that, just thought she should know it's not always a given


 

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