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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curby View Post
    Except soft drink 😉

    I'm currently on placement (secondary teaching) and homework is expected to be set for each subject daily. It then takes up to half a lesson to go through the homework and correct it, eating up valuable classroom time.

    I think small amounts of homework are fine, but the grid posted by @Elijahsmum seems crazy to me, that's so much work for primary school.
    See that isn't an issue at our school as there are plenty of times during the day where the kids are with other specialist teachers and the home room teacher marks the homework. And spelling words get tested every Friday so they don't get marked anyway.

    I agree if too much time is taken up marking homework it's not working. We moved out kids to a new school where a lot more thought seems to go into homework and how much is appropriate and realistic and it works fine. I think it also hugely helps that my kids are not stressed about doing it. If I had a child for whom homework was a nightmare I'd no doubt feel very differently.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoThisIsLove View Post
    Our dd starts school next year. Is it compulsory to do the homework? As a parent can I refuse? Other than some reading I don't agree with it at all.
    Yes, its an expectation and compulsary.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoThisIsLove View Post
    Our dd starts school next year. Is it compulsory to do the homework? As a parent can I refuse? Other than some reading I don't agree with it at all.
    Yes you can. At the beginning of each year I approach my children's teachers and tell them I don't believe in homework before year 5, that we will participate in projects and reading, and they may send homework sheets home if they are handing them out but they will only be done if my child chooses to and there is to be no punishment at school if they don't. I also ask them to tell me if they notice that they are falling behind in anything, because then we absolutely will put extra effort in at home and work with the teacher to bring them back up to speed with their peers.

    ETA - You may have a hard time if your child is off to a school where they believe homework is compulsory...I deliberately avoided those schools

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by CMF View Post
    For those who vehemently disagree with homework, which seems like quite a few people, how do you expect a child to go from zero homework to lots of homework in high school?
    I don't. There is no proven benefits to homework before year 5, but after that there are benefits, and so from year 5 we introduce homework. I also explain to my kids, as they reach that age, that the type of learning is different in highschool and it does shift a bit more towards self directed learning (in that they learn a concept at school but then have to practice it at home) so that they will be ready for university which is all self-directed learning. I have had no problems with this. Also, by the time they're in year 5 they aren't as tired, so they can cope with the after school activities and homework.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by A-Squared View Post
    My kids aren't of school age yet but I find this topic very interesting. A few posters make it sound like they don't like it because they don't want to dedicate the time to it themselves, but your post is interesting to me.
    .
    Without trying to be rude...I don't think you can pass judgement until you've experienced it yourself. In the early years kids are stuffed...so you need a 7.30pm bed time at latest so they can get through the week without falling apart from exhaustion.
    Here's an afternoon:

    3.20pm - home from school, unpack bags, clean out lunch boxes, read notes from teachers, have afternoon tea, get ready for afternoon sport.
    4pm - out and about with after school sports.
    5.30pm - Home from after school sports, wrangle kids for showers and organise dinner, pack lunches for next day.
    6.30pm - 7pm - eat dinner.
    7pm - get kids ready for bed.
    7.20pm - pick a child to listen to read because there's only 10 minutes until bed time....and struggle with it because their little eyes are hanging out of their head and they just want to go to sleep.

    I hate homework, because it's near impossible trying to fit it in! But I parent solo through the week so there's just me and the kids, and there's an after school activity on every afternoon (and my kids only get to pick two activities each so it's not like I have them enrolled in too much), and sure, I could take homework to the after school activities for the kids who aren't participating that day but there are so many distractions it's not funny and you don't get very far. Plus your kids want to discuss their day with you, which is just important as academic learning but negotiating playground antics is a skill in itself and you need to guide your kids through that too.

    So yeah, I'm against homework, but it's not like I just don't want to engage in my children's learning. I volunteer at the school, I have been involved in committees at the school to discuss changes being made, talk to their teachers regularly, read all the notes etc. but it's not really easy to fit in those extra 20 minutes at the end of every day....well, at least not in this family it isn't.

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    DrDrakeRamoray  (26-07-2015)

  7. #46
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    Completely agree with @Partyofthree. Choose schools wisely. No one would send a child to my kids' school and then say they don't want them to do homework (or maybe they would but it would be unusual).

  8. #47
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    Whereas we have no trouble fitting homework in. I have 4 kids and work part time and they often aren't all home until close to 5 as they have things on after school or they are at school from 730 for before school activities. Homework takes each kid between 10 and 20 minutes and they get it done. What doesn't get done they do the next morning if there is time.

    But as I've said homework is important to me so we make it happen.

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    Rose&Aurelia&Hannah  (26-07-2015)

  10. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Party of Three View Post
    Without trying to be rude...I don't think you can pass judgement until you've experienced it yourself. In the early years kids are stuffed...so you need a 7.30pm bed time at latest so they can get through the week without falling apart from exhaustion.
    Here's an afternoon:

    3.20pm - home from school, unpack bags, clean out lunch boxes, read notes from teachers, have afternoon tea, get ready for afternoon sport.
    4pm - out and about with after school sports.
    5.30pm - Home from after school sports, wrangle kids for showers and organise dinner, pack lunches for next day.
    6.30pm - 7pm - eat dinner.
    7pm - get kids ready for bed.
    7.20pm - pick a child to listen to read because there's only 10 minutes until bed time....and struggle with it because their little eyes are hanging out of their head and they just want to go to sleep.

    I hate homework, because it's near impossible trying to fit it in! But I parent solo through the week so there's just me and the kids, and there's an after school activity on every afternoon (and my kids only get to pick two activities each so it's not like I have them enrolled in too much), and sure, I could take homework to the after school activities for the kids who aren't participating that day but there are so many distractions it's not funny and you don't get very far. Plus your kids want to discuss their day with you, which is just important as academic learning but negotiating playground antics is a skill in itself and you need to guide your kids through that too.

    So yeah, I'm against homework, but it's not like I just don't want to engage in my children's learning. I volunteer at the school, I have been involved in committees at the school to discuss changes being made, talk to their teachers regularly, read all the notes etc. but it's not really easy to fit in those extra 20 minutes at the end of every day....well, at least not in this family it isn't.
    Not everyone has the same after school schedule though.
    Here's mine;
    2.20 school pickup for ds1
    One afternoon a week I take ds1 for a milkshake, another afternoon he has swimming, 1 afternoon a week he has footy. 2 afternoons a week we go to the library to do homework and read. This is our 1 on 1 time, ds1 loves this time we have and loves that I do his homework with him, I like to know what he is doing at school and his achievements and happy to help him in areas he needs help with.
    3.30 or 4pm pick up ds2 and ds3 from daycare.
    The kids play outside and dh joins them when he gets home from work just after 4.
    I unpack bags, get dinner started.
    Family time outside until dinner.
    6.15 dinner then baths
    Dh reads a book, we all say a prayer together.
    Bed at 7.30.

  11. #49
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    Default "Spinoff" sort of - is homework necessary in primary school?

    Quote Originally Posted by Party of Three View Post
    Without trying to be rude...I don't think you can pass judgement until you've experienced it yourself. In the early years kids are stuffed...so you need a 7.30pm bed time at latest so they can get through the week without falling apart from exhaustion.
    Here's an afternoon:

    3.20pm - home from school, unpack bags, clean out lunch boxes, read notes from teachers, have afternoon tea, get ready for afternoon sport.
    4pm - out and about with after school sports.
    5.30pm - Home from after school sports, wrangle kids for showers and organise dinner, pack lunches for next day.
    6.30pm - 7pm - eat dinner.
    7pm - get kids ready for bed.
    7.20pm - pick a child to listen to read because there's only 10 minutes until bed time....and struggle with it because their little eyes are hanging out of their head and they just want to go to sleep.

    I hate homework, because it's near impossible trying to fit it in! But I parent solo through the week so there's just me and the kids, and there's an after school activity on every afternoon (and my kids only get to pick two activities each so it's not like I have them enrolled in too much), and sure, I could take homework to the after school activities for the kids who aren't participating that day but there are so many distractions it's not funny and you don't get very far. Plus your kids want to discuss their day with you, which is just important as academic learning but negotiating playground antics is a skill in itself and you need to guide your kids through that too.

    So yeah, I'm against homework, but it's not like I just don't want to engage in my children's learning. I volunteer at the school, I have been involved in committees at the school to discuss changes being made, talk to their teachers regularly, read all the notes etc. but it's not really easy to fit in those extra 20 minutes at the end of every day....well, at least not in this family it isn't.
    You weren't rude but you were mistaken. I quoted Renn who is a teacher who said amongst her teaching peers there are many who don't agree with homework.

    I acknowledged I don't have school aged children and I asked her for some research I could read to teach myself something I don't know much about because as I stated I don't have school aged children.

    I also referred generally to a few posters who said it was a pain in the bum and that was it.

    So you have valid points (and thank you for sharing them) you weren't being rude but you were definitely picking on my comments for no reason other than you completely misread / misinterpreted my post as I wasn't passing judgement as you state, I was just asking for resources to expand my knowledge of something I have no experience in
    Last edited by A-Squared; 26-07-2015 at 13:56.

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  13. #50
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    I don't agree with homework at all but reading is a good think obviously.
    But it doesn't really matter as a parent what do we do tell the school that we don't agree and our children won't be doing it at all.
    That will go down real well.
    Same goes with Naplan some parents keep there children off from school because they don't agree with it ...what do you do ...


 
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