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  1. #21
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    I find this thread interesting/amusing. I grew up in India and suffice to say the education system in vastly different. By grade 3 I was learning 2 extra languages at school and most of my school mates were going to tutors 2-3x a week. I had a SAHM who enforced a strict homework time every day for 2 hrs and is multilingual so she tutored us at home.

    After we moved to australia, both my parents were worried we would lose our studying ethic so we had extra study set up by them on top of what the teachers gave out and holiday study structured as well.

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    So if it's not part of school curriculum, why are some students 'punished' for not doing it?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rose&Aurelia View Post
    I find this thread interesting/amusing. I grew up in India and suffice to say the education system in vastly different. By grade 3 I was learning 2 extra languages at school and most of my school mates were going to tutors 2-3x a week. I had a SAHM who enforced a strict homework time every day for 2 hrs and is multilingual so she tutored us at home.

    After we moved to australia, both my parents were worried we would lose our studying ethic so we had extra study set up by them on top of what the teachers gave out and holiday study structured as well.
    I have friends who have moved to Aust from india with their children. They say exactly the same thing, &getting a 'good' education is so highly valued,they would spend hours doing extra study. They have such an amazing ethic and attitude towards education, they see it as a privelage, & absolutely put their all into it when it comes to their children. It makes me realise how privelaged we are in australia, to be able to expect a good education for our children without having to put in too much effort ourselves.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elijahs Mum View Post
    This is what DS school next year says they should be doing per day - I don't remember doing that much as a kid?
    Attachment 71786
    Btw in my experience the homework they get can never be done in the time they set in their little charts.

    It's alway double, triple or even longer.

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    I don't think it's about not wanting to put effort in at home, but studies show there's no benefit until year 5.

    There are ways to teach kids without strict homework and tutors. My oldest
    improved spelling by writing letters to a pen pal and having spelling bees in the car for example. IMO the best kind of learning is the one that is enjoyable. That same child this year has a super chilled teacher...they listen to music when working, when it's obvious the kids don't want to do work anymore they stop and play a game in class. My child is thriving in this learning environment and bringing home books from the library that relate to what they are learning at school, making up projects on the topic to show the teacher what they have learnt independently. This is the ultimate in my eyes....if a teacher can ignite a passion to learn independently without even needing to set tasks then they're doing their job right. And all the kids and parents love this teacher. She is brilliant.

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    As a parent I'm not a fan. My boys don't even get much. Aside from the typical read for at least 10 minutes a day at home (which IMO shouldn't be seen as homework but just a part of leisure/ life) and then write out their spelling words x4 and put them all in sentences. It's like pulling teeth. They hate doing it after school because they have been working all day. On the weekends we are catching up with family or going on adventures. They are only in grade 1 and already are over it.

    As a teacher, I also hate it. In my last school all I asked was nightly reading and for spelling words to be practiced at least 3 times a week. It was up to the individual student if they wanted to- I never checked or corrected. It was always obvious looking at spelling results who was doing what I asked. For those that chose not to practice I would then put some gentle pressure on them to challenge themselves to learn those words by next week or whenever.
    In my first teaching position we had to give out homework sheets copied from books as a part of the school policy. The school said they were doing it in response to pressure from parents to give homework. In a grade of 24 only 5-8 were handed in weekly. I gave no repercussions for not doing it, because I also hated the amount of time it took to correct. Time I could have better spent writing up new lessons or working on displays or similar.

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    I'm not fussed either way really. But then I have kids who are willing to do homework. In the younger grades I don't really see much benefit, except reading.
    In upper primary though I think they need homework.
    Having had the experience of transitioning a child into high school, I found that his 'study skills' were very much lacking. So if primary teachers can't find time to teach these study skills, I would be more than happy to do it at home through homework, ie setting a research assignment for the term's homework. And practising studying for a test.
    This will be something I will be speaking to my kids school about and something I feel would be very useful.

    I also think it's useful to get kids used to doing homework for highschool. Going from no homework to over an hour a day is hard.
    Last edited by CMF; 26-07-2015 at 10:12.

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    Our dd starts school next year. Is it compulsory to do the homework? As a parent can I refuse? Other than some reading I don't agree with it at all.

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    Default "Spinoff" sort of - is homework necessary in primary school?

    Quote Originally Posted by Renn View Post
    This topic is one of perpetual discussion amongst teaching groups I'm a part of. What amazes me is that the majority of teachers seem eager to ignore the research, and rule in favour of homework. Now that's not the case for everyone...but it's always the majority view when it comes up.

    Personally? I'm against homework in the majority of cases, as what evidence we have shows no benefit. There are exceptions though, and some kind of homework are better than others.
    My kids aren't of school age yet but I find this topic very interesting. A few posters make it sound like they don't like it because they don't want to dedicate the time to it themselves, but your post is interesting to me.

    Have you got any research papers on this? Not that in asking you to 'prove' what you're saying, but I'm truly interested to see the research around this so I can form my own opinion.
    Last edited by A-Squared; 26-07-2015 at 10:52.

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    I think it is fine in moderation. It is a way to involve parents in their childs schooling is how a teacher explained it to me once and I agree. Some parents I am sure would just send their kids to school and not take an interest in what they do schoolwork wise or even know where their child is at.


 

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