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  1. #11
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    My daughter is only 2, so I'm not sure how I feel about it in primary school. But I fully support a reasonable amount of it in high school. For example, in Maths, we would learn a concept, work through an example question as a class, then be told to complete these 20 questions to practice the concept. We would start this there with the teachers help available, then finish it for homework. It reinforced what we learnt in class. If we didn't have homework, it would take way longer to get through concepts and I think a lot would be forgotten from one lesson to the next.

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  3. #12
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    I hate homework and I would love if all homework other than reading be banished from primary school.

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    DrDrakeRamoray  (26-07-2015)

  5. #13
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    Not for early primary years, no. Reading is fine, but everything else just gets ignored here. We're lucky and our school does not really believe in homework, so it's handed out for the students who's parents want homework essentially.

    My anecdotal evidence is this - without homework, my kids are keeping up with their peers, one is actually one of the brightest in the year, and the kids who are smarter aren't by much. The kids who are smarter have parents who thoroughly believe in strict, set homework and make their kids do a minimum amount of homework every day and on the weekend. My older children get 30 minutes of reading in time in bed before lights out, they can read whatever they want to. In the 'pre-reading' years I sit and listen to the home reader, and then they get to look through books and make up the stories themselves. I can't link to this, but a study was done that has shown that kids who read to the family dog learn how to read faster than those who read to a parent every night! So I figure as long as they have a book in their hand and are engaging in it in some form it will benefit them.
    Kids need to come home from school and engage with their parents, play with friends, attend after school activities, be productive in the home etc....they don't need to come home and sit down in front of activity sheets after being at school all day.

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  7. #14
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    I'm a teacher.
    I think homework causes more stress than necessary.
    I have read some research papers about how, after a certain time, like 15 minutes. ...there's no real benefit.
    Reading. ..and a bit of number work is great. But hours and hours of homework in primary school is ridiculous.
    I'd love to see it gone! !!!

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    I am a teacher. I think that SOME kinds of homework are beneficial.
    Hours of sitting in front of worksheets, dragging their feet and doing mundane, boring work after being at school all day - not beneficial.
    Doing a take-home reader in the younger years, and reading 1:1 with an adult - VERY beneficial. Projects/ assignment/ research based work in the older primary years - beneficial. Not every week, or every day. Maybe one a term.
    SOME practice of skills already learned in class - can be somewhat beneficial. A child can seem to be doing really well with a concept in class, and then go home & find it really difficult at home. That homework then gives the teacher some very important information about how well the child has learned the concept, and the teacher will need to take that on board for their teaching.

    For homework to be effective, good home-school communication is essential. Homework should never be about learning new skills, only ever practising skills the child is fairly competent in. It should be 'easy', at an instructional level. It should be individualised for different children. It should strengthen the home-school relationship, and help the parent to be involved in their child's learning. It shouldn't impinge on the child's home life and play time after school. The teacher should assess the homework and use it to inform their teaching. 15 minutes of homework at night can be beneficial if it is well planned by the teacher.

    As a side note, I still remember doing 'projects' in primary school, and I LOVED it! I was one to excel with self-directed learning. It would be really sad if I wasn't given the opportunity to excel in an area I was really interested in.

  9. #16
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    my DD is in year 4 - and I have to say I am pleased with the amount of homework she gets.

    Its not much ... about 30 minutes per week. Lets her try and do things for herself but doesn't interfere in outside activities. Good balance

  10. #17
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    Nope I don't.

    I think children need time to be children. They need time to play. To be free. To relax and unwind. To spend time with their families. Climb trees, read books, learn things they're interested in.
    Children learn through play.

    They sit in a class 6 hours a day. They don't need the added extra at home. I do agree with reading though and I think it should be up to the parents and child(ren) if any further study should happen.
    My kids don't get a lot of homework but it's still stressful when other things such as after school activities, dinner, playing etc are happening.

    Don't get me started on the amount of poor high school students get. Crikey!!!

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  12. #18
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    My eldest daughter ( grade 4) brought homework home the other week and it said to help parents around the house and with cooking dinner. I thought "cool, this is homework I actually agree on!" Lol

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    I dispise homework. There are many arguments over homework at home between myself and 8yr old kiddo. Its quite rare he is eager to do it but he needs to do it as he is falling behind at school unfortunately. Next year is going to he serious business for his homework. He will be doing it regardless as he will be in grade 4 so he needs to get prepared for assignments etc he will be given

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    I am fine with hw atm. DS1 is in kindergarten (NSW) and gets one sheet a week plus a news topic. I like seeing what he is up to at school and he's never had trouble doing it so it's not a chore to get it done. He usually hands it in early anyway so he has the rest of the week for whatever he likes.

    I am however disappointed that he hasn't gotten any home readers yet. We read at home but I feel they are moving too slowly at school.


 

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