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  1. #11
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    Next time just hand him the "skin colour" crayon.

  2. #12
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    I think it *is* a big deal. I grew up being told at school that I wasn't allowed to use the 'skin colour' pencil, I had to use the 'poo colour'. It hurts. I don't think kids are too young to be encouraged to think about the language they use and how it may affect others.

    I don't think I've ever seen a kid, say, reach for a blue pencil and call it 'eye colour'. What's the difference I wonder?

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  4. #13
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    My 4yo DD was talking about what colour to use for her hair the other day. She said 'i have blonde hair. What colour is that?' So I said I usually use the yellow pencil for blonde because it looks the most similar. I didnt get upset about her asking about the colour of her hair. Why get upset about the colour of her skin? It should be treated as the same thing. Hair colour, skin colour... if I said someones hair was 'poo colour', that would be very offensive, as would saying their skin was that colour. I definitely agree language needs to be inclusive and not offensive, but their is no point denying that the childs skin is that colour. I would often encounter 'which colour to use for skin' in my reception classroom, we would have a little discussion that you could use yellow, brown or pink (no peach in the 5yo class!). I would just say 'that is YOUR skin colour. Not everyones skin colour.

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    It's only skin colour of your skin is that colour. I'm not brown. I'm skin colour. You know, them white people skin colour. Gah.

  6. #15
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    I think it depends on the context, has he had a lot of regular exposure to other nationalities that aren't peach? If not them maybe as others have said he called it skin colour as that is what he has.
    Or was he drawing a picture of his family ( or another peach coloured person) and just called it that as that is what his picture was?

    To put this into context leaves can be all different colours, if he was colouring leaves on a picture of an autumn tree then if he asked for the leaf colour pencil it would be a different colour than if he asked for one for a christmas tree.

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  8. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by cheeeeesecake View Post
    My 4yo DD was talking about what colour to use for her hair the other day. She said 'i have blonde hair. What colour is that?' So I said I usually use the yellow pencil for blonde because it looks the most similar. I didnt get upset about her asking about the colour of her hair. Why get upset about the colour of her skin? It should be treated as the same thing. Hair colour, skin colour... if I said someones hair was 'poo colour', that would be very offensive, as would saying their skin was that colour. I definitely agree language needs to be inclusive and not offensive, but their is no point denying that the childs skin is that colour. I would often encounter 'which colour to use for skin' in my reception classroom, we would have a little discussion that you could use yellow, brown or pink (no peach in the 5yo class!). I would just say 'that is YOUR skin colour. Not everyones skin colour.
    I'm not sure that I'm understanding your point fully. But my point, or at least what I was trying to say, is kids don't say 'hair colour' or 'eye colour' and imply that it is one generic colour. Why is it so common with skin? It's not about labelling it as offensive, I just think that it should be challenged.

    Fwiw kids in the school in the lands did the same thing, but obviously with their own and their family's skin colour as reference. We had the same conversations there.

    If a kid said 'I'm going to use my skin colour' in this picture, I wouldn't make a comment. If they say something like 'pass me the skin colour', I say 'which skin colour do you mean?' I'm not a **** about it, I just want them to be aware.

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    I think calling it "skin colour" implies white skin is the norm and everything else is secondary. I don't want my son to be insensitive to others. As PP have said it upset them as children and I wouldn't want that for a child in my sons class. It might seem like an insignificant thing to a white person but that comes from a place of privilege.

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  12. #18
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    http://feminspire.com/how-racism-aff...the-doll-test/

    ...but please, tell me how the small things are not a big deal.

    Ignoring racism doesn't make it go away.

    I applaud the OP for trying to educate her child.

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  14. #19
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    When my dd asked for a skin colour pencil I said there is no such thing, we lined all our arms up next to each other and looked at the difference ranging from me fair to dp medium tanned and discussed how all skin colours are different mums is more a light pink and dads is a in between light brown and dark brown now they ask which colour matches whoever they are drawing the best. It's a non issue in our house.

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    I don't think it's a big deal, I would of just pointed out which skin colour one would you like? And showed brown and peach.

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