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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by kbf2plus2 View Post
    Wow... I'm really sorry, OP, that you aren't getting some more positive responses.
    I began home schooling our children because I really don't like the way the education system works. Unfortunately, due to the fact that I am time poor and our home schooling was more like unschooling (I don't have anything against unschooling, it just wasn't what I wanted for our children), I enrolled our girls at the local primary school, because I felt they weren't functioning at their full potential.
    Home schooling takes a lot of commitment and from what I've observed from other home schooling families I know, they spend a lot of time attending "extra curricular" activities (music classes, art classes, etc) to make sure they are covering all the curriculum. I think all the families I know also have difficulties at times with getting their children to do school work.
    I disagree with the argument that teachers spend 4 years at uni, so how can an untrained person possibly teach their children. I am a trained teacher and I will say that my 4 years of university training were largely useless. When I entered a classroom for the first time, I was completely unprepared. There is nothing particularly "special" about being a teacher.
    Also, the argument that children need to go to school to be "socialised" is rubbish, in my opinion. Unless you plan on keeping your children prisoners in your home and not allowing them contact with anyone outside your immediate family, they will mix with plenty of people of different ages and backgrounds in different situations, and if that isn't socialisation, I don't know what is.
    I do agree with other posters, though, that it would be helpful if your husband was on board. I would continue to talk to him about it and encourage him to learn about it before he made a decision.
    In regards to prospects after highschool, if that is an issue for you, I'd work backwards -- contact some universities/tafes and find out what requirements there would be for home schooled applicants. Again, I don't believe (myopinion and my experience) home schooling does not limit prospects.

    I have probably waffled on long enough. In summary, all the issues your husband has highlighted, in my opinion, are not issues at all. If I had more time and resources to do it properly, I'd home school my kids again in a heart beat. (There is rarely a week that goes by that I'm not growling about some aspect of school or the education system.) We are off to highschool at about the same time as you, and I too am considering home schooling as an option again.

    I, for one on this forum, can see the benefits of homeschooling and if it's something you think you and your children can handle, then I say go for it -- just try to get your hubby on side first.
    I actually think most responses were positive, apart from the ones trying to make the OP see that she needs her husbands support.

  2. #42
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    So I'm going to try to express why I think this is a huge mistake OP. I'm probably wasting my breath as you are saying you don't care what others say including your husband but maybe it might plant some kind of seed.

    1) Teaching, particularly in high school is highly skilled. There is a reason it's a 4 year degree. Teaching it semi-adequately is not fair to your kids.

    2) What happens if they want to go to uni? You say there are other jobs that don't need tertiary but these days that's minimum wage. Do you really want to force your children into the poverty line cleaning toilets (note: there is NOTHING wrong with being a cleaner but some want to do other things) bc of your decision? What if they want to be a nurse or an architect?

    3) I think you are being unfair on your husband. He is either raising them as a father figure or he isn't. If you plan to HS FT I'm assuming you'll be not working at all so he is solely supporting 'your' children. I have a few friends who have new partners raising their kids and they would be gutted if they were told they got no say "bc they aren't your kids".

    4) You mention bullying/issues in high school. Obviously no one wants their kids bullied or lonely. But interacting in a school environment builds resilience and social and emotional learning. Going to the park with another HSing family isn't the same. Kids need to learn conflict resolution, to develop self esteem and inner strength.

    5) Your children are 3 years off high school which puts the eldest in year 4. With respect, a 9 year old doesn't fully understand what HSing, or unschooling will fully involve. They are probably agreeing bc you want them to and bc they see it as a novelty of not going to school.
    Last edited by delirium; 17-07-2015 at 14:41.

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  4. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by DT75 View Post
    I actually think most responses were positive, apart from the ones trying to make the OP see that she needs her husbands support.
    I meant "positive" as in "the affirmative".

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    Could there be underlying things within yourself that are leading you down this path? If so perhaps you could get help/talk to someone and see if you feel the same in a year or so? - I could be totally off base just a few things you mentioned peaked my interest.

    I think your DP has just a big a vote as you with this one. The social norm is schooling. There is research galore behind each and every program in a school. If you are trying to convince your husband you will need to do more than google research. Get your kids assessed and see what their learning styles are - then match it with scientific based research which targets that learning style. Are you prepared though, for the possibility that homeschooling may not be best for one or more of your kids?

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  8. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrDrakeRamoray View Post
    But he will be at work all day!! What's the difference!! I could start home schooling now and he'll be gone in the morning from 7/8 to 4/5 or later at night.



    I feel like I have to get permission from him to do this. Id like for him to at least listen to me.

    I have already made up my mind.
    I am going to trial it to begin with and if if doesn't work out we will look into highschools.

    Anyway, I'm done arguing. Thanks for the opinions although I don't agree with a lot of you.
    I think this is where I would be a little concerned.

    I ask why you wanted to homeschool - and your concerns with education and what is available to you in your area and affordability are certainly valid. Montessori etc is expensive, and if the public school in your area isnt very good then looking at other alternatives is certainly worthwhile.

    With your partner (whether he is the childrens bio father or not, he is still their father and taking part in parenting decisions yeah?) ... its not about the time or skills involved in doing it - "if he is at work all day whats the difference to him???" isnt really the point.

    Schooling - where they go, the style of education they get and the overall upbringing ... they are joint parenting decisions. You each need to have input and be comfortable with what you decide.

    If he and you disagree about the basics - that is something you need to work through.

    Best wishes, whatever you decide.

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  10. #46
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    Ok thanks for the responses.. I will try to talk more to dp. I have 3 years to do it.

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  12. #47
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    What happens if the kids decide at some point that they want to go to school? That, for instance, it's boring being at home with my mum all day, I want to hang out with people my own age without my mum being around.

    Also, the bullying thing, although it scared the h3ll out of me, do you think maybe you are selling your kids short? Perhaps they are stronger and more resilient than you think??? What happens if they get bullied at sport? Do you then just unenrol them because it's just too hard and unfair?

    I won't start on the DP thing although I do agree with previous posters.

    I think you need need to make a huge pros & cons list.. Don't just say child now likes the idea right now in 2015... What will their personality be like in 3 years time? What will their needs be at that time?

    And I dunno, shipping off your youngest so that you can teach your eldest.. I dunno, is that fair to the little one??

    Just lots to think about I think for you OP.

    Good luck

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    Quote Originally Posted by babyla View Post
    I've been an educator in the primary and tertiary sectors for over 15 years and Im not for or against any type of schooling. There is only the right schooling for the right child. It's working out what that is and it can't be based on pre-conceived ideas on education based on our own assumptions or experiences.

    I would suggest visiting and spending time in local and varied high schools to assist in making a decision. Schooling and schooling choices have changed a lot in the last 20 years. What might have been our own experience has often changed or evolved - in many settings it looks and feels different. I've set up a school thats philosophy is personalised, inquiry based and open learning and I've been at traditional settings too, both have things to offer the right child and family.

    Just check some settings out before you decide and likewise spend some days with homeschooling parents. You've got enough time to do some really rich research.

    Mainly though don't assume your experience will be your child's.

    Good luck!
    I'm also a teacher and agree with every word of the above post.

    Before finalising anything, I would definitely visit all nearby government high schools. Don't rely on what you have heard about them either, go there and look around. Get a feel for the place, do the kids chat happily as they move from one class to the next? Are they alert and attentive? See what the kids are doing in the various classrooms (I use that term loosely as a highschool 'classroom' may be a shed of car parts, a hair salon, a 150 seat theatre or a commercial kitchen now days).

    The two local high schools near me are only 4km apart but might as well be on opposite sides of the world. They vary so greatly in their philosophy and the education pathways that they offer. Neither is wrong or right, just the right school for the right child/family.

    As an aside, the one piece of advice I would have for anyone considering homeschooling. "Teaching" - the job of ensuring the best learning outcomes for a child/ren - has very little to do with content and curriculum. The "how" you teach has a much greater impact than the "what". I would advise lots and lots of reading into the many theories on the psychology of learning (or going to courses, or whatever works for your learning style) so that you have a range of strategies to access once you do start on your homeschooling journey.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrDrakeRamoray View Post
    I know people that went to school who can't read and write...

    And he's dismissing my opinions etc too by not listening. I do understand his (and others) concerns.
    It's a lot easier to resent a parent for doing a shoddy job and ruining your future than a teacher

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    Default I want to start homeschooling when kids are in highschool

    Quote Originally Posted by DrDrakeRamoray View Post
    And what about my wishes? My kids wishes? They aren't even his kids!
    Ouch. My eldest has a different father to our child, but we make decisions together. I want a private school for our daughters, however he wants Steiner or public. We are working together on it but I would NEVER just do what I want simply because I want it. Would you allow him the sole choice of deciding where your fourth child goes?

    I hope you can get him on board, however as you say, you have three years. Perhaps as PPs have mentioned, you should do some more thorough research with HSing families & take DP with you.


 

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