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  1. #21
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    From a psych background perspective:

    I'd be very surprised if you could find a psych to run an IQ test in a standard session. There is a lot of work that goes into completing an assessment, from initial rapport building with the child, collecting developmental history from parents, doing the assessment itself (administration + scoring/interpretation) and then writing a report and meeting with parents again to feed back the results. It's quite a time intensive task, hence the price tag attached. It is possible to have an IQ test completed at 3; however the results are often more reliable once the child is older, 6 years plus.

    Given that the test itself is quite time and cost intensive, I'd question whether you really need to get it done at all. I personally wouldn't bother putting a child through it unless the information was really needed. At three, the value in having the information is really quite limited, as PPs have said.

    As others have said, just provide your child with as many varied learning activities as you can for now. Once they get to school, you can talk to your child's teacher about extension activities if they need it. You'll find that schools have their own entry criteria for gifted and talented programs that usually depend on in-house testing results and/or teacher recommendations, and formal IQ results are not required.

  2. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to besha For This Useful Post:

    CazHazKidz  (06-07-2015),cheeeeesecake  (07-07-2015),gizmoduckus  (06-07-2015),MsViking  (06-07-2015)

  3. #22
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    Thanks for your replies. I'm not really looking for to any formal diagnosis, just more books and resources to find out what sort of signs to look out for and how I can strengthen his interests. I'm not very smart myself so I don't want to b

  4. #23
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    bring him down (so to speak!!)

  5. #24
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    At 3, learning through play is probably going to be the best thing for him. Toys that rely on motor skills and/or imaginative play are great - like Duplo/Lego, or shops like national geographic also sell great toys that also offer learning experiences. Make sure you've got lots of books available to read (if he can already recognise his letters, start teaching him how sounds go together so he can read simple books himself), jigsaw puzzles, do practical activities together like baking, take him shopping and ask him to remember a short list of things and remind you what you need. Make up a big crate of different objects and ask him to sort the items by size (biggest to smallest, or if he knows numbers, teach him to use a scale and lightest to heaviest), colour, type etc.
    Most of these you can scale up the difficulty level if it seems too easy for him so you're still providing a challenge.

    You don't need to design a structured program for him as such - just open him up to lots of new experiences and if he shows a particular interest in anything, just do what you can to encourage him to explore that further and learn what he can about it, same as for any kid really. You're certainly not going to hold him back, unless you offer him no learning or play experiences at all, which it definitely doesn't sound like you're doing!

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  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by moosey View Post
    Thanks for your replies. I'm not really looking for to any formal diagnosis, just more books and resources to find out what sort of signs to look out for and how I can strengthen his interests. I'm not very smart myself so I don't want to b
    Is he bored? I think the above post was fantastic

  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by moosey View Post
    Thanks for your replies. I'm not really looking for to any formal diagnosis, just more books and resources to find out what sort of signs to look out for and how I can strengthen his interests. I'm not very smart myself so I don't want to b
    Whatever he is interested in, encourage it. DD loved cooking games so I involved her with food prep & some cooking. DD loved planets & space, so I bought her a telescope. DD is obsessed with how the body works, so I got her a toy skeleton with organs she can take out & put back (like a 3D puzzle) along with an App game about the different functions of different organs.

    If he is interested in blocks, print images of things he can build with them. If he loves 'how things work' get him some 3D puzzles from the hobby shop. If he is interested in writting & maths there are some awesome apps to encourage these skills.

    Basically whatever he shows an interest in, encourage it!

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  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by besha View Post
    From a psych background perspective:

    I'd be very surprised if you could find a psych to run an IQ test in a standard session. There is a lot of work that goes into completing an assessment, from initial rapport building with the child, collecting developmental history from parents, doing the assessment itself (administration + scoring/interpretation) and then writing a report and meeting with parents again to feed back the results. It's quite a time intensive task, hence the price tag attached. It is possible to have an IQ test completed at 3; however the results are often more reliable once the child is older, 6 years plus.

    Given that the test itself is quite time and cost intensive, I'd question whether you really need to get it done at all. I personally wouldn't bother putting a child through it unless the information was really needed. At three, the value in having the information is really quite limited, as PPs have said.

    As others have said, just provide your child with as many varied learning activities as you can for now. Once they get to school, you can talk to your child's teacher about extension activities if they need it. You'll find that schools have their own entry criteria for gifted and talented programs that usually depend on in-house testing results and/or teacher recommendations, and formal IQ results are not required.
    Thanks so much, this is what I'm looking for


 

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