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  1. #1
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    Default Glasses for 4 year old

    My 4.5yr old DD went to the optometrist for her first checkup late last year. The optometrist noted that her eyes turned outward when she was focusing and this was something that we should review again in 6 months. When we went for the follow up visit yesterday, he said that it hadn't self corrected and that she would need glasses.

    I guess my DH and I were a little surprised as we hadn't noticed anything and our DD hadn't mentioned not being able to see clearly/getting headaches or any of the usual symptoms that I would have expected.

    Has anyone else had similar experiences with their kids eyes?

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    My ds1 doesn't need glasses yet but we had his eyes checked about a month ago at 18 months as he was getting travel sick and my dad who is an optician thought he had a squint at times. Again I didn't notice anything but when I started looking into it realised these things need to be corrected early.

    Although the optician couldn't find a squint my ds is long sighted with one eye worse than other so we need to go back in 6 months. I expect we probably will need glasses at some point maybe with a patch as my husband had same issue as a child.

    I know that doesn't really answer your question but what I'm trying to say is that often problems are detected that we wouldn't see and you need to sort them early (often before age 7ish) or they can be permanent. It was good you got her eyes checked now so you have a good chance to try and resolve the problem. Good luck.

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    Anndrosa  (04-06-2015)

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    My daughter (2.5) has a hypertrophic strabismus as a result of congenital fourth nerve palsy (just google it, easier than me explaining) which causes her eyes to have what is commonly referred to as a squint.

    She's had corrective surgery on her right eye, and will have corrective surgery on her left within the year. Glasses don't fix her particular problem, however there are many alignment problems that glasses DO fix.

    We had to patch for 3 months prior to surgery because her binocular vision and (cannot for the life of me remember the correct term) how well each eye sees on its own was decreased in one eye significantly. Over time, the brain turns one eye off to correct permanent double vision.

    It is this long term decrease in sight that is the key reason for treating these conditions, so please don't make a judgement based purely on cosmetics eg 'it's not noticeable to the lay person and he can see fine for now so let's just forget about it.'

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by cakeish View Post
    My daughter (2.5) has a hypertrophic strabismus as a result of congenital fourth nerve palsy (just google it, easier than me explaining) which causes her eyes to have what is commonly referred to as a squint.

    She's had corrective surgery on her right eye, and will have corrective surgery on her left within the year. Glasses don't fix her particular problem, however there are many alignment problems that glasses DO fix.

    We had to patch for 3 months prior to surgery because her binocular vision and (cannot for the life of me remember the correct term) how well each eye sees on its own was decreased in one eye significantly. Over time, the brain turns one eye off to correct permanent double vision.

    It is this long term decrease in sight that is the key reason for treating these conditions, so please don't make a judgement based purely on cosmetics eg 'it's not noticeable to the lay person and he can see fine for now so let's just forget about it.'
    Our concerns are not based on cosmetics, rather it has been based simply upon a lack of clear symptoms. We are also not planning to 'forget about it'. I was just looking for people with similar experiences!

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    My 4 year old got glasses at the beginning of the year for astigmatism. I thought it would be way worse that it has been, he wears them willingly despot being a difficult child. The check up last month revealed it had corrected the issue. Apparently getting onto it when he was 3.75 was in our favour. Everyone comments how trendy and cute he looks too.

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  8. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiny2011 View Post
    My 4 year old got glasses at the beginning of the year for astigmatism. I thought it would be way worse that it has been, he wears them willingly despot being a difficult child. The check up last month revealed it had corrected the issue. Apparently getting onto it when he was 3.75 was in our favour. Everyone comments how trendy and cute he looks too.
    Sounds like a gear outcome. Did your DS show any symptoms before you had the diagnosis?

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    Just some squinting when he was getting tired. It was detected at the 3-4 year old nurse check up they have.

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    Anndrosa  (04-06-2015)

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    I should also say when I mention the glasses corrected the issue, that doesn't mean he doesn't have to wear them anymore, it meant glasses taught his brain to see properly without having to do behavioral eye exercises to get things working as well.

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    Anndrosa  (04-06-2015)

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    My DD who is 10 had no real symptoms at all. She had glasses younger (for copying off the board) but that corrected itself, as we were expecting.

    We took her to a behavioural optometrist this year. She has issues with eye fatigue, her eyes focus short of what she is looking at....these a just the few issues I can pull off the top of my head.

    We really didn't think there would be anything concerning. We hadn't noticed anything that worried us, it was a box to tick off. She now has glasses that are graduated and are quite strong which she wears for all close up work and anything that requires focusing at a long distance and then close up.

    I don't think there are always 'symptoms', especially if the deficit is not a huge one. The other parts of the eye and brain can compensate, but it does have consequences later.

    If you are really worried get another opinion and see what they say.

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    Anndrosa  (04-06-2015)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anndrosa View Post
    Our concerns are not based on cosmetics, rather it has been based simply upon a lack of clear symptoms. We are also not planning to 'forget about it'. I was just looking for people with similar experiences!
    I'm so sorry, I honestly didn't mean to infer that! We had a LOT of people tell us that they couldn't see DD's strabismus and that we shouldn't get the operation because her symptoms weren't terrible etc. It is very hard to get people to understand that even the slightest alignment issue wrecks havoc on how the eyes focus and how the brain reacts.

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