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  1. #21
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    Default How strict are you at mealtimes?

    No I'm not strict at all.

    Dd is 16 months old, she will eat her meals in her high chair with me next to her but I rarely eat at the same time (most of the time it's just her and I ). When she's finished she usually tries to chuck it on the floor (unfortunately for me) and that's it really. She's getting better at eating dinner but up until recently she would throw everything I made for dinner on the floor or just flat out refuse to put it in her mouth, I was making 2 or 3 things.

    Now I'm over that, I make one thing, I put it in front of her and leave her to it, she seems to eat a lot better when I'm not in her face trying to get her to eat (go figure, I wouldn't like that either).

    Sometimes she will eat enough and sometimes she won't and I will give her a fruit pouch or yoghurt after.

    Her dad says when ever she's at his house she eats dinner, I think that has to do with her sister being there and copying her.

  2. #22
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    Our mealtime rules are very similar to Rose and Aurelia. Only difference is my son is allowed water - because he often doesn't drink enough during the school day. Before he was at school I restricted water at meal times.

    I also put a time limit on dinner or he could easily sit there for 1.5 hrs. Not practical when we have afternoon activities, homework, bedtime etc.

    Also forcing my kids to taste (this to me means more than a tiny bit on the tongue, rather a few sizeable bites) has helped in ds enjoying a wide variety of food.

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    Rose&Aurelia&Hannah  (26-05-2015)

  4. #23
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    We are pretty laid back about food.
    Dinner is always at the table with no tv on.
    Kids have to taste everything and if they don't like it I will make them something else.
    Both kids are awesome eaters and willingly try new foods.

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lincolns mummy View Post
    What does your husbands family do?
    No talking at the table. Finish everything in front of you even if you don't like it. Favourite foods are not taken into account. Same seven meals served every week. Dh's mum is not a good cook. Even dh and I struggle when we visit to eat there.



    wifey of hubby who is always away. mother of two girls who are always amusing.

  6. #25
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    DD is 3.5 and some nights she eats loads and other nights hardly anything. It depends on what she's eaten that day.

    We try to eat dinner together at the table most nights and she doesn't get any special meals. We all eat the same thing. If she doesn't eat, there are no alternatives (I don't give her things that I know she doesn't like or that are inappropriate like really spicy foods etc). We encourage her to eat at least a few bites but we don't push it. If she mucks around too much, like getting up and down or being silly with the food, we take it away.

    We rarely do dessert so she knows there will be no more food after dinner. We have a pretty solid routine of dinner/bath/teeth/story/bed so there's no post-dinner snacking.

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  8. #26
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    Default How strict are you at mealtimes?

    Relatively, I try to offer a variety of foods on her plate and I expect her to try everything. If she doesn't like it she can leave it. I encourage her to drink her water during meal times as I know that I can't eat a meal without being able to drink my water. If she pushes her plate away and says done then she's done. Sometimes if I think she hasn't really eaten enough I will try to encourage a few more bites but it's never a battle. At dinner time she gets pudding regardless of how much she has eaten - usually some fruit/yoghurt/cookie/whatever cake I've recently made. We mix it up so she doesn't always expect sweet/cakey things. I've actually found that if her plate is full at dinner she will eat less than if it doesn't have much on and she's able to get more if she's hungry still... She has breakfast (I try to make sure she eats at least one whole banana, sometimes she will ask for another), morning tea, lunch, afternoon tea (after her nap) and then dinner with pudding. She's a pretty good eater so I haven't had to be that strict to be honest. She isn't offered anything different to what we are eating (except if it's something spicy I add a few spoons of Greek yoghurt to hers to cool it a little).
    DD is nearly 21 months.

  9. #27
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    I like us to have relaxed meal times. I put dinner in front of the kids, or they choose it from a serving plate in the middle, and then we all eat together as a family. We chat and have an enjoyable time. We always sit at the table. The kids choose what things they will eat on their plate, they can take it or leave it. I never force or coerce them to eat. I never tell them to 'eat it all' or 'finish their plate', I teach them to listen to their bodies and stop eating when they feel full. When they don't like something, they are not allowed to use negative words such as 'yuk', they say 'no thankyou', or leave it on their plate. I try to enforce manners and appreciation for the person who cooked the meal. I never make an alternative, and they don't get anything else to eat after dinner. We always have water to drink during meal times. If they don't want to eat much, that's fine, but they need to sit at the table with the family for a bit. We have healthy, balanced meals, and the occassional 'sometimes food' dinner once a month or so. They are fantastic eaters, and we all really enjoy the family meal time.

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  11. #28
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    We try to make sure we have no battles at food times. I was brought up in a you will eat everything and you won't leave the table till you have household and I now have food issues, one being I can't leave food on a plate.

    We eat together at the table wherever possible, we all eat the same and there are no other options. DD is 2 and she has always had what we have, spicy, meaty, pasta, rice whatever. I try to make sure there is something I know she will eat but at the end of the day if she misses one meal because she doesn't like what I've made it isn't the end of the world. We don't do dessert except plain Greek yoghurt. When she has finished we have taught her to say all done, at which point she is done, no matter how much she has eaten or not.

    She has a mid morning snack usually a banana and a mid afternoon snack usually a rice cake or similar plus three main meals. She is also allowed as much water as she wants. She is not allowed anything other than water to drink except a milk before bed.

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  13. #29
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    Thank you for the responses We do do alot of those things already but I do tend to try and encourage her to eat more than I should and it feels more like a battle than a gentle nudge. So I think it is a lesson more for me and DH to scale it back and let her do it they way she is going to do it! (or something like that )

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  15. #30
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    I won't say it's easy, esp as we had weight issues with my DD as a baby. So you do feel like you should be doing the old just one more bite ect, and sometimes we do, my DH esp.

    But we definitely don't negotiate, and if she wants yoghurt after dinner but she hasn't eaten much food, that's fine too.

    As a pp mentioned, we just provide the food, I let her decide what and how much she eats.


 

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