+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    297
    Thanks
    56
    Thanked
    154
    Reviews
    0
    harvs, I work in education and often wonder about DD's articulation. I'll often say that I know what they are supposed to do from 4years up but have no idea from 0-4. The things that you mention sound largely developmental (I know R and L sounds develop later) but a hearing test is never a bad idea. The lady who did DD2's newborn hearing test said she thought all children should have their hearing tested every 6 months.

    As to the things my DD1 does - I now realise that I don't know specifically which sounds she can't do but I do know she has some sound substitutions. The thing I notice the most is that she has difficulty with words that begin with 's' particularly in consonant blends, such as 'stop' and 'stick'. She often transfers the s to the end of the word so it becomes "tops".

    I find her understandable about 80% of the time and others about 40-50%. If I'm concerned about her speech I repeat the word back to her a few times and may ask her to listen and repeat it.
    Last edited by Leafy; 14-05-2015 at 22:25.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    2,729
    Thanks
    1,522
    Thanked
    1,959
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Now, I ought to know which sounds are generally learnt in which order (I did a lot of study on this at uni) but can't remember :P I'm sure the internet can tell you. Suffice it to say that there's quite a broad 'normal' range. There are a couple (l for y in certain positions, such as "lellow" for "yellow"; swapping consonants where it's easier to pronounce, such as "hopsital" or "aminal") are quite common up until about 5 or 6. For the most part, this kind of pronunciation stuff is down to...terms that I should know and can't remember :P The ease/difficulty of pronouncing certain combinations of sounds, essentially.

    If you think he might need some help, I'd think:
    1 - check hearing
    2 - everyday stuff to assist with speech, like repeating what he's said the "correct" way. So... "pyane!" "yeah, it's a plane". You can also emphasise the sound he appears to be missing, and attempt to get him looking at your mouth while you pronounce those sounds. Even little games where you try to get him to copy sounds, like "lalalala" etc. can help. Also talking about sounds without expecting anything from him...like... "hey, it's a dog. da for dog" etc.

    Apologies if that's complete rambling, I'm half asleep here :P
    I'm not sure about DD's pronunciation. She's about the same age as your son, but she's always been advanced in her language. There are definitely things that she mispronounces, and certain sounds and combinations that she struggles with. Will pay attention tomorrow and let you know some of the things she doesn't pronounce properly.

    Edit: just had a look at the link regarding articulation. THAT'S the stuff I was attempting to remember! Great resource.
    Last edited by Renn; 14-05-2015 at 23:22.

  3. #13
    Busy-Bee's Avatar
    Busy-Bee is offline Offending people since before Del :D
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    11,183
    Thanks
    3,664
    Thanked
    4,704
    Reviews
    2
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Past Moderator - Thank you
    Not sure if you remember but my DS pretty much didn't talk at all until he was 3ish and had a massive amount of early intervention (speech therapy) - I have sat though many MANY speech therapy sessions from 3 therapists. With some of the pronunciation:
    - "J" is one of the most difficult sounds to make, it is a combination of "D" and "G". I remember this because it's the first letter of DS's name and he left it of when he spoke of himself until he was about 4.
    - proncouncing "L" as "Y" is very common. I remember the therapist spent a while teaching DS to bring the tip of his toughe to the top of the front of his mouth when saying the "LLLLL" sound. He would have pictures of things on bits of paper which he would pick up, say the word then post it in the post box made of a shoe box. Words like shell and girl etc.
    - DS was still staying "D" for "th" sounds until he was about 6.5/7 which I was assured was completely normal.

    I would say, if in doubt then see a speech therapist but I am only saying that because I was way too relaxed about DS believing he would catch up when I should have seen a speech therapist much sooner. I don't think you have anything to worry about but it's always better to be sure now rather than have regrets in years to come.

    How's his hearing? Do you have any reason to suspect his hearing is not 100%?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    in a wormhole
    Posts
    2,769
    Thanks
    4,600
    Thanked
    2,802
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    At 2 my DS couldn't say yellow or orange, and he said 't' for 'ck' sounds, as well 'b' instead of 'v' and 'g' sounds.

    Now at 5 he is a lot clearer but still struggles with 'ck' at the end of some words and still struggles with 'gr' words like green but is improving all the time.

    A helpful trick that a speech therapist told me is to encourage them to drink using the tip of a straw. It helps strengthen the muscles used in speech. So every time DS had a cup of water I'd give him a fun curly straw. It makes them work a bit to get the water and it really did make a difference to his speech. They need to not put the straw too far into their mouth though - just the tip.

  5. #15
    Busy-Bee's Avatar
    Busy-Bee is offline Offending people since before Del :D
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    11,183
    Thanks
    3,664
    Thanked
    4,704
    Reviews
    2
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Past Moderator - Thank you
    I also remember DS had difficulty articulating "L" sounds in words, he left it out for a long while. It got a little embarrassing when he said the word "clock".

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    on a sandy beach!
    Posts
    6,332
    Thanks
    336
    Thanked
    2,197
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Dd is two and will say

    Scissors, yellow etc things like that but she will not say BOTTLE OR APPLE!!

    She says babble. Or bobble. I don't know why? She says bird etc aeroplane her brothers name bigger words etc.

    So i have no idea ☺️

  7. #17
    harvs's Avatar
    harvs is offline Winner 2014 - Spirit of BubHub Award
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    9,996
    Thanks
    6,239
    Thanked
    15,892
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 9/4/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 2/4/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 19/3/15Busiest Member of the Week200 Posts in a week
    Wow thanks everyone for your replies! I feel a bit better now, especially since looking at the link. I had no idea that the developmental range encompassed so many years.

    I think I'll relax for a bit and keep an eye on things for the time being.

    Monnie those random words are so funny aren't they? DS said 'boo-er' instead of water for ages then randomly just said water one day. It was so weird. I always wondered if he was hearing himself say 'water' the whole time or not?

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    2,729
    Thanks
    1,522
    Thanked
    1,959
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Something I DO remember from uni is that kids generally do hear themselves saying things correctly... if you ask them which they said, they'll tend to pick the 'correct' one, not what they said. DD definitely "corrects" us on things which she can't pronounce properly.

    Just listening to her talk to herself, and a few things she mispronounces:
    w for r - "he wan and he wan" "wabbits" etc.
    d for th (unvoiced) and v for th (voiced) "allll de over wabbits" "dis one" etc.

    She definitely recognises the sounds though. She'll say "rrr for rabbit" for example (of her own accord, not copying what she's hear), even though half the time she won't pronounce it as an 'r' in a length of speech.

    I know she says lellow, hopsital and aminals. Would definitely "correct" me if I pronounced those words that way though.


 

Similar Threads

  1. Possible theft at toddler's birthday party - wwyd?
    By Night Owl in forum Social Issues
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 25-03-2015, 14:05
  2. Anyone experienced this? - ulcers in toddler's mouth
    By Night Owl in forum General Child Health Issues
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-03-2015, 20:52
  3. Childhood Apraxia of Speech (Speech Dyspraxia)
    By Lathlainmum in forum Development Stages
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: 30-09-2014, 01:40

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Ro&Co
Share magical moments this Christmas with this gorgeous gingerbread house. Exclusively available in Brisbane, with FREE delivery in Brisbane Metro areas. Each Christmas Centrepiece is unique and made to order, from $240.
sales & new stuffsee all
Wendys Music School Melbourne
Wondering about Music Lessons? FREE 30 minute ASSESSMENT. Find out if your child is ready! Piano from age 3 years & Guitar, Singing, Drums, Violin from age 5. Lessons available for all ages. 35+ years experience. Structured program.
Use referral 'bubhub' when booking
featured supporter
LCF Fun Languages Australia
We offer foreign language lessons for children 2-12 yrs in French, Spanish, Mandarin, Italian or German as after-school and preschool clubs or private language tuition. This is play-based, full immersion language learning with proven results!
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!