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  1. #21
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    It's quite normal here to have gendered parties from about year one or two but generally prior to that, it's mixed.
    I don't think I'd think anything of it though, as a PP said better this than inviting everyone bar one or two.

  2. #22
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    It wouldn't phase me. It is a great way to keep numbers down. Though I would expect it more in primary school than daycare.
    For DS1'S 5th birthday he only invited boys from preschool and 2 girls, the girls couldn't make it. He did have some that were family friends there though.

  3. #23
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    Haven't read all the replies but it wouldn't bother me unless I thought my child was very good friends with the birthday child.

    DS1 is 5 and he tends to have gender specific parties. From a very young age (12m) he seemed to form tight friendships with boys and have no interest in girls apart from his cousin.
    @VicPark - I don't think you did anything about it.

  4. #24
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    I wouldn't even notice unless my boy was a good friend of the birthday girl.
    In which case I would say something to the parents along the lines of, "Oh DS mentioned X is having a party, but he is upset that only girls are invited?"

    This happened when DSD was younger. She wanted a fairy princess party at age 4. We arranged it and invited boys and girls. The boys were bored and didn't take part in anything and basically (in DSD's words) "ruined it". They were running around with sticks and hitting each other, etc.
    So at age 5 we tried it again and only invited girls. It was awesome and DSD had a great time. A few parents questioned why their boys weren't invited (even though none of the boys were her friends anyway) and we explained that it was a fairy princess party, they said "oh ok ours boys wouldn't be interested in that", and it was all good.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Miss Sunshine View Post
    I personally don't have an issue with it. It's not like you're excluding just one or two kids. A good way to keep numbers down too.

    Eta: Growing up in primary school this was the norm where I was. Not this whole everyone has to be invited stuff.
    Yep this. I recently had ds's 4th birthday party and only invited the boys from his kinder.

  6. #26
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    I don't understand it at all. On the one hand we try and teach our kids that people shouldn't be excluded because of their gender, and then people have parties like this. I mean really what is the point of it? My kids have friends that are both boys and girls. But I've friends who kids only want the same gender at their birthdays. I don't get it.

  7. #27
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    I understand, not a huge biggy however if my DD was I vited to a party DS wasn't - could be a bit of a rift at home

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by beebs View Post
    I don't understand it at all. On the one hand we try and teach our kids that people shouldn't be excluded because of their gender, and then people have parties like this. I mean really what is the point of it? My kids have friends that are both boys and girls. But I've friends who kids only want the same gender at their birthdays. I don't get it.
    The thing is that it's not necessarily about exclude a person because of gender, but girls and boys do naturally enjoy different things. You can't change that.

    My DS loves cars, trucks, balls etc, even though he does have a few dolls and a kitchen, he spends far more time playing with the more boyish toys.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by tw1nmummy View Post
    I understand, not a huge biggy however if my DD was I vited to a party DS wasn't - could be a bit of a rift at home
    Why they are the same person. Surely they have different friend group or will as they grow older.

    I have done it quite a few times. Invited the twin that was my child friend and not his twin brother who wasn't her friend.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by BettyV View Post
    I find it a little odd for the pre-school age group. I would have thought at 3 they were a little young to have made the gender differentiation in friendships. I don't think I'd do or say anything about it though.
    I think along these lines. While it was the norm for me in primary school, I don't think my DD (3.5) would only invite all the girls, she's invite some of both.


 

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