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  1. #21
    harvs's Avatar
    harvs is offline Winner 2014 - Spirit of BubHub Award
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    @monnie is your DD still eating in a high chair?

    If not you could put her back in one and tell her it is because she is acting like a baby at mealtimes?

    If she is, could you get a mini table and chairs (they're like $15 at IKEA) and tell her if she starts to behave she can pick a cushion/tablecloth/special bowl or something and start to eat dinner there like a big girl?

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    BlondeinBrisvegas  (03-05-2015)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Renn View Post
    For my 2.5 year old:

    -ignore minor misbehaviour
    -redirect/distract when I have the energy
    -point out consequences (eg. ouch, that hurt me. I don't want to play with you anymore)
    -warnings when something's really inappropriate, with a choice, and follow through (e.g. dropping food on the floor intentionally. "That's for eating. You need to keep it on your plate, or I'll take it away." Often she'll grin and do it again, at which point I take it away.

    That's really it at this point. Natural consequences where possible, obvious logical consequences where that isn't possible. I haven't yet found any need for any form of punishment/punitive consequences in most situations.
    This is what I always did/still do but mine are 10, 7 and 3.5 now.
    I've not used time outs for any of my kids - well, I tried it with DD and it didn't fit our family and then someone recommended a book about guidance discipline called "Children Are People Too" by Dr Louise Porter but I think the name of it has changed now and that really became my bible.
    I hope you can find some strategies that work for you xx

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    A child will always eventually stay in time out. You just have to preserve. My daughter got off time out the first time I put her in it, over 50 times. Each time I just quietly without a word out her back on it. It takes consistency and sticking with it no matter how long it takes. After 35 minutes of getting off time out, she eventually sat there for 2 minutes and now, as soon as she's on time out, she'll cry, but she won't move from that chair.

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    DT75  (05-05-2015)

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    Quote Originally Posted by FirstTimeMummy2012 View Post
    A child will always eventually stay in time out. You just have to preserve. My daughter got off time out the first time I put her in it, over 50 times. Each time I just quietly without a word out her back on it. It takes consistency and sticking with it no matter how long it takes. After 35 minutes of getting off time out, she eventually sat there for 2 minutes and now, as soon as she's on time out, she'll cry, but she won't move from that chair.
    Ya the first few days/weeks of implementation are chaotic.
    I don't miss those days.

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    billykate  (12-07-2015),FirstTimeMummy2012  (06-05-2015)


 

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